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What is lifecycle marketing? - Smart Insights

What is lifecycle marketing? - Smart Insights | Hospital IT | Scoop.it

marketingIO: One Source for All Marketing Technology Challenges. See our solutions. 


Via CYDigital
Timothy Broderick's insight:

Bear in mind that marketing automation is considered a subset of Lifecycle Marketing. Perhaps it should be the other way around, where LCM is a differentiator for a MAP.

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Farid Mheir's curator insight, February 24, 2016 8:58 AM

Another twist in the customer journey and its impact on marketing. The article also highlights the need for omni-channel approach and proper technology foundation for emails in particular.

Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 1, 2016 12:32 PM

Another twist in the customer journey and its impact on marketing. The article also highlights the need for omni-channel approach and proper technology foundation for emails in particular.

Bougrier Benjamin's curator insight, March 3, 2016 3:17 PM

Bear in mind that marketing automation is considered a subset of Lifecycle Marketing. Perhaps it should be the other way around, where LCM is a differentiator for a MAP.

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Bienvenue chez les #Numéricains, excellente série sur la tendance profonde du numérique

Bienvenue chez les #Numéricains, excellente série sur la tendance profonde du numérique | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
Série de témoignages fascinants sur l’impact des nouvelles technologies sur nos vies.

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Farid Mheir's curator insight, June 29, 2015 11:57 AM

Must see and listen this series that delivers portraits of real people and how they have transformed their lives through digital. Fascinating.


WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT

It presents real-life people to understand key digital trends such as gaming for a living or youTube blogging. Plus I love the name they gave it!

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Here is 100 of the Best Apps for iPhone and iPad to help you in Business

Here is 100 of the Best Apps for iPhone and iPad to help you in Business | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
There are a tons of apps available for iPhone and iPad. Today we have to list 100 Best Apps for iPhone and iPad.

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What makes Android world's leading mobile OS?

What makes Android world's leading mobile OS? | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
This new discusses about things that make Android a leading mobile OS over the world.

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Does Portal, EHR Implementation Boost Patient Engagement?

Does Portal, EHR Implementation Boost Patient Engagement? | Hospital IT | Scoop.it

Within the world of healthcare, patient engagement has evolved into a major goal across the industry. Patients and their caretakers need to be mindful of their overall health and wellness in order to put a dent in mortality rates and adverse health outcomes. How does EHR implementation and health IT come into the mix in better engaging patients with their overall health?

 

A key tool that many providers have incorporated in their practice is the patient portal, which is part of the overall platform that’s adopted during EHR implementation. A portal offers patients an application for securely messaging their physician and ordering medication. In general, patient portals can be leveraged to assist with medication management and scheduling appointments for preventive care. These methods could potentially lead to better outcomes and healthier patients.

 

The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) explained in a May 8 article that more healthcare institutions are focused on health IT and EHR implementation in order to help families and patients maintain a healthy lifestyle and adhere to medication management and other techniques for managing any chronic illnesses.

 

There are a variety of healthcare settings and many patients take months or even years to recover from injuries or other serious conditions. Do long-term care patients also need health IT tools to remain better engaged with their recovery and wellness goals?

Similar to other healthcare consumers, patients with a long road ahead of them often struggle to remain focused on their health. Whether patients are managing chronic illnesses, recovering from cancer treatments, or overcoming other medical conditions, the money and time necessary to remain dedicated to improving their health may be prohibitory.

 

Healthcare professionals from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital asked parents which technologies and tools help them better manage their child’s overall care. The patient portal was cited as a significant tool that assists parents with remaining engaged in their children’s care process.

 

In particular, the ability to track doctor appointments and request scheduling changes in the portal helped parents stay on track with their children’s care. The caretakers also gave several suggestions for improving the portal and providing tools that can enhance patient engagement. One suggestion asked for mobile device applications that will share patient activities and events information.

 

Additionally, it may benefit patients and their families to be alerted to schedule challenges, receive prompts at out-patient visits, and track test results as well as review medical terms. All of these capabilities can be achieved with optimal technologies and the implementation of upgraded patient portals.

 

While these suggestions are important to consider, they also show that patient portals may not be living up to their prior expectations. Results from a HIMSS Analytics survey shows that healthcare organizations may need to move beyond patient portals to get higher levels of patient engagement.

 

“Even if organizations have a vision for real patient engagement, many are consumed with checking the boxes for meaningful use,” Joe DeSantis, Vice President of HealthShare Platforms, InterSystems, said in a public statement. “Unfortunately, a patient portal based on a single EHR is not enough to move patient engagement forward. Engagement needs to span the entire care continuum. The short-term focus on meaningful use has often been at the expense of long-term strategic goals.”

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
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Laurie Bolick Wolf's curator insight, June 17, 2015 2:38 PM

Patient engagement refers to having patients be involved in their own healthcare.  The primary route of this has been through patient portals.  With a portal, patients can make appointments and communicate with their doctors, gain valuable educational material, and see lab and imaging results.  The EMR puts all this information in one place for the patient.  However, it depends on how involved the patient is in his/her own care.  The patient must create an account and select what information they want.  While I think it is a great idea in concept, it is not reaching the majority of patients who choose not to participate.

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Should Physicians Tailor Patient Engagement Based on Age?

Should Physicians Tailor Patient Engagement Based on Age? | Hospital IT | Scoop.it

New patient engagement trends from TechnologyAdvice Research reveals digital engagement is a growing factor in how patients choose healthcare providers.

 

Quality of care has long been a primary factor in choosing a healthcare provider, but convenience and communication are also becoming key considerations for patients. Still, many physicians do not appear to be offering the digital engagement services that can meet those demands.


According to a new nationwide survey conducted by TechnologyAdvice Research, a majority of patients (60.8 percent) said digital services like online appointment scheduling and online bill pay are either “important” or “somewhat important” when choosing a physician. However, when asked what services their current physician provides, less than one-third of patients indicated they have access to either online bill pay, online appointment scheduling, or the ability to view test results and diagnoses online, which are the top three services that patients report wanting the most.


“Primary care physicians are reporting some of the highest rates of EHR adoption to comply with government regulations and to receive incentives from Meaningful Use, but a significantly lower number of patients claim to have access to these patient portal services,” said TechnologyAdvice Managing Editor Cameron Graham, who authored the survey. “The issue here may not be implementation of digital services, but instead a lack of patient awareness. If physicians are offering these in-demand digital services, a more proactive approach to promoting them is needed and could create an advantage in attracting and retaining patients.”


TAKEAWAYS 


- If providers wish to gain an upper edge in attracting new patients (especially younger ones), and in retaining their existing patients, they should invest in a fully featured patient portal system. For many primary care physicians this should not be difficult. Most comprehensive EHRs include patient portal features, and dedicated patient portal vendors are making strides in integrating with third-party systems. In particular, prioritizing systems with intuitive online appointment scheduling, online bill pay functionality, and online test results could provide a significant draw for new patients. 


- For practices that already have patient portal systems, they should dedicate resources to making sure their patient populations are informed of the existence of such services. They should also consider prominently featuring these services in their advertising and on their websites. When orienting new patients to their practice, providers need to have a plan for walking patients through the initial portal set-up requirements and making sure they understand the features available to them.


-For particularly tech-savvy practices, a dedicated smartphone app could help set them apart, and attract younger individuals. 


more at http://hitconsultant.net/2015/01/16/should-physicians-tailor-patient-engagement-based-on-age/






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Why Videos Are Hospital Marketing’s Secret Weapon

Why Videos Are Hospital Marketing’s Secret Weapon | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
Video content can be the secret weapon of hospital marketing when it is aggressively integrated into the overall strategic plan—and ahead of the competition

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Pharmaceutical firms wake up to the power of social media

Pharmaceutical firms wake up to the power of social media | Hospital IT | Scoop.it

Top pharmaceutical companies are making far more effort to engage audiences on social media claims a report “Connecting the Dots: Which Pharma Companies are Succeeding in the Social Media Space?“ from agency Ogilvy Healthworld. Looking at the pharma companies which are most successful on social sites, the report suggests that in order to engage audiences, firms must be brave and prepared to have honest and meaningful conversations about their brands.

“We know that some pharma companies have been cautious in their approach to social media, but our report clearly demonstrates a dramatic and successful increase in activity,” explains Rebecca Canvin, social media manager at Ogilvy Healthworld, adding: “social media has changed the way pharma companies communicate – it allows them to build corporate reputation and engage in genuine, meaningful conversations with audiences. For companies who want to stand out from the crowd it’s time to be brave, get personal, educate and integrate social media into their wider marketing strategy.”

On one hand, it is surprising that healthcare firms are so keen to use social media, as regulatory boundaries and compliance constraints provide some limitations on what they can say. On the other hand, social media provides the perfect forum to explain about latest health findings, as Canvin says: “People don’t want to wade through hundreds of pages of disease information, but they may be more open to new knowledge on social media … Social media has the potential to revolutionise the way big pharma educates physicians, allowing doctors to obtain the facts they require without the many issues often associated with rep visits or advertising to clinicians.”

Key findings

The average number of tweets by pharma has gone up by 530 per cent since 2013 and Twitter followers have increased by nearly 300 per centThe pharma companies with the biggest communities aren’t necessarily the most effective at engaging with their users and generating interest.Followers reward pharma companies who post frequently and engage continuously – those that keep their networks fresh with regular updates have the highest interaction from the community.

 

Looking at the firms which better communicate on social, it seems that size isn’t everything. Those companies with the most followers don’t always succeed in engaging their audiences. For example, companies Boehringer and Novo Novdisk have community sizes well below the average, yet score highly when it comes to engagement.

What does drive engagement is the amount a company uses social media. Canvin explains: “It isn’t hard to understand why the most active companies are the ones enjoying the most engagement – after all, social media in its very nature demands participation and interaction. And, of course, any conversation is a two-way street. The increase in involvement that we saw in 2014 is not just because pharma companies are becoming more active, but because their audiences are also showing a little more willingness to jump in. Overall, it seems that followers will reward the companies who post frequently and engage continuously – those organisations with high activity scores received more likes and comments on Facebook and more replies from Twitter followers.”

Methodology

The data for the report was gathered by monitoring 10 of the most popular networks for 14 pharma companies across six categories: social presence, social network, community size, activity, engagement and activity. The profile of each company was reviewed for one week per month for three months during 2014 to ensure sufficient data was collected.

 


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In support of measuring patient satisfaction

In support of measuring patient satisfaction | Hospital IT | Scoop.it

I had two experiences recently that reminded me that many doctors and nurses remain resistant to measuring and improving how patients experience the care we provide. One was a face-to-face discussion with a senior physician. The other was reading an article by a nurse. Both the doctor and the nurse denounced the growing focus on the patient experience by citing the threat to the quality of care, and I believe both of them were totally wrong.

The encounter with the physician came as I addressed a group of newly hired physicians. As I typically do in these circumstances, I outlined our medical group’s commitment to increasing the visibility of the results of our patient experience surveys. We have been providing our physicians with reports on their patients’ feedback for the better part of a year, and we anticipate posting physician-specific results on our public website within a few months. During the Q&A, one of the physicians objected to the plan, saying that “patients can’t judge the quality of care that we provide.”

 

The article was entitled “The Problem with Satisfied Patients” and decried the effort being made to boost hospital-specific patient satisfaction scores by adding hotel-like amenities and scripting staff, both of which she characterized as threats to clinical care and patient safety.

In both cases, the case against focusing on the patient experience was based on flawed logic and, sadly, probably more than a small dose of self-interest.

The doctor’s mistake was that while his observation about patients’ inability to judge quality may be correct, it is irrelevant. We are not asking patients to judge quality. In fact, there is considerable evidence that patients — precisely because they can’t judge technical quality — just assume we are all competent. Instead, we are asking them to judge their own experience (which, of course, only they can judge), and the two are not in conflict. Since when are empathy and good communication, key determinants of patients’ experience, anathema to quality?

OK, here it comes — what about all those crafty doctors who will practice “bad medicine” to boost their satisfaction scores? You know, prescribing antibiotics to kids with viral syndromes so as not to “disappoint” those pushy parents, or handing out narcotics to make patients happy. Well, what about them? Is this “threat” any more pressing than the one posed by some doctors doing more tests than they should to boost their income? Do we stop paying all doctors because some may bill in unethical ways? Why would we stop caring about finding out how patients experience their care because some doctors may respond unethically? No one is saying that patient experience scores are more important than quality, any more than we are saying that “productivity” is more important than quality.

The logical error is to reject the use of any measures of patient experience because using only measures of patient experience would create perverse incentives.

The nurse made a similar goof. Sure, if patient experience scores were the only measure used to judge hospitals, we would be in deep trouble. And sure, some institutions respond foolishly to the pressure to improve their scores (instead of their patients’ experience) by trying to goose up trivial amenities instead of really understanding what matters to patients. Neither of which invalidates the importance of understanding and improving how patients experience the care we provide.

Here’s something else to consider: true empathy, respect, and effective communication, which are cornerstones of providing a good patient experience, can improve clinical outcomes by reducing patients’ stress, fostering sharing of critical information and boosting adherence to care plans. Nothing in conflict with quality there.

 


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Wearables 2015: Defining digital medicine

Wearables 2015: Defining digital medicine | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
Digital medicine is poised to transform biomedical research, clinical practice and the commercial sector. Here we introduce a monthly column from R&D/venture creation firm PureTech tracking digital medicine's emergence.


Technology has already transformed the social fabric of life in the twenty-first century. It is now poised to profoundly influence disease management and healthcare. Beyond the hype of the 'mobile health' and 'wearable technology' movement, the ability to monitor our bodies and continuously gather data about human biology suggests new possibilities for both biomedical research and clinical practice. Just as the Human Genome Project ushered in the age of high-throughput genotyping, the ability to automate, continuously record, analyze and share standardized physiological and biological data augurs the beginning of a new era—that of high-throughput human phenotyping.


These advances are prompting new approaches to research and medicine, but they are also raising questions and posing challenges for existing healthcare delivery systems. How will these technologies alter biomedical research approaches, what types of experimental questions will researchers now be able to ask and what types of training will be needed? Will the ability to digitize individual characteristics and communicate by mobile technology empower patients and enable the modification of disease-promoting behaviors; at the same time, will it threaten patient privacy? Will doctors be prescribing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared apps on a regular basis, not just to monitor and manage chronic disease but also to preempt acute disease episodes? Will the shift in the balance between disease treatment and early intervention have a broad economic impact on the healthcare system? How will the emergence of these new technologies reshape the healthcare industry and its underlying business models? What will be the defining characteristics of 'winning' products and companies?


These are just some of the questions we plan to ask over the coming months. In the meantime, we introduce here some of the key themes shaping R&D in the digital medicine field and focus on what they might mean for the biopharmaceutical and diagnostic/device industries.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ed Crowley's curator insight, May 17, 2015 8:30 AM

Wearable medical technology is quickly changing the potential for health research, and with IoT, health management. 

Be-Bound®'s curator insight, May 18, 2015 9:54 AM

And this is just the beginning ! 

Kim Flintoff's curator insight, April 12, 2016 3:04 AM
Big data is impacting on every industry. Health and personal monitoring devices are increasingly linked and the questions raised in this piece tie together big data, computational thinking and IoT considerations. Shrugging in exasperation is less helpful than modelling innovative new apporahces to problem-solving. Therein lies some of the promise of a data-driven culture.
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Infographic: 3 Steps to Engage Patients in Advance Care Planning « Healthcare Intelligence Network

Infographic: 3 Steps to Engage Patients in Advance Care Planning « Healthcare Intelligence Network | Hospital IT | Scoop.it

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Medical Device and Mobile Health Market to Reach $8 billion

Medical Device and Mobile Health Market to Reach $8 billion | Hospital IT | Scoop.it

The mobile health market is making headway and many industries around the world are stopping to take notice. At the CARTES SECURE CONNEXIONS AMERICA 2015 taking place at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC next month, mHealth will be one of the topics discussed in great detail, according to a press release from events organizer COMEXPOSIUM Group.

 

It is revolutionary that mobile communications technology like tablets, smartphones, and laptops can all lead to better follow-up care and healthcare diagnostics or treatments. Mobile applications like fitness trackers can also be incorporated in preventing disease.


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Salud Pública 2.0's curator insight, May 1, 2015 12:09 AM

Según informe, se espera que el mercado global de dispositivos médicos y vigilancia de la salud móvil que crezca a una tasa compuesta anual del 43,3 por ciento desde 2013 hasta 2019

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What Is Patient Engagement: Health IT Leaders Define the Term - Electronic Health Reporter

What Is Patient Engagement: Health IT Leaders Define the Term - Electronic Health Reporter | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
Patient engagement is now synonymous with health IT, yet the topic is proving to be one of healthcare’s stickiest wickets.

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Christine Winters's curator insight, September 10, 2014 10:50 AM

Interesting perspectives, confirming patient engagementis not just a check box, and to say it's synonymous with health IT is to vastly underestimate the challenge at hand.

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The 10 Most Important Business Skills in 2020 (Infographic)

The 10 Most Important Business Skills in 2020 (Infographic) | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
In just six years, the skills you'll be looking for in star employees will be vastly different from those ideal in today's workers. Consider this your crystal ball.
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Tony Guzman's curator insight, July 7, 2015 9:43 AM

This infographic shares the expected business skills in 2020. Actually, most of these have a general education foundation and are not so different from those expected in 2000 or 2010, in my opinion. Any surprises?

Michael Ravensbergen's curator insight, July 7, 2015 2:23 PM

Virtual collaboration!!

EZIA's curator insight, July 8, 2015 1:07 PM

Times are changing and you need to learn the many skills that will be required in the future to be successful

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An introduction to the Smartphone of the Future

An introduction to the Smartphone of the Future | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
The Smartphone of the Future
A great Video Featuring what the Smartphone of the Future could look like
and what features it could have, well worth watching.

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Affimity's curator insight, June 24, 2015 1:56 AM

I would love to share this on Affimity Digital Life (http://www.affimity.com/)

Paula Weir's curator insight, June 24, 2015 4:48 AM

really interesting video about possibility within mobile

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Grow Your Business: 5 Tips for Scaling Up

Grow Your Business: 5 Tips for Scaling Up | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
Want to grow your business quickly? Here are five tips to help you scale up.

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BSN's curator insight, June 5, 2015 8:26 AM

#business #marketing

Marco Fuentes's curator insight, June 7, 2015 5:19 PM

añada su visión ...

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Does Portal, EHR Implementation Boost Patient Engagement?

Does Portal, EHR Implementation Boost Patient Engagement? | Hospital IT | Scoop.it

Within the world of healthcare, patient engagement has evolved into a major goal across the industry. Patients and their caretakers need to be mindful of their overall health and wellness in order to put a dent in mortality rates and adverse health outcomes. How does EHR implementation and health IT come into the mix in better engaging patients with their overall health?

 

A key tool that many providers have incorporated in their practice is the patient portal, which is part of the overall platform that’s adopted during EHR implementation. A portal offers patients an application for securely messaging their physician and ordering medication. In general, patient portals can be leveraged to assist with medication management and scheduling appointments for preventive care. These methods could potentially lead to better outcomes and healthier patients.

 

The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) explained in a May 8 article that more healthcare institutions are focused on health IT and EHR implementation in order to help families and patients maintain a healthy lifestyle and adhere to medication management and other techniques for managing any chronic illnesses.

 

There are a variety of healthcare settings and many patients take months or even years to recover from injuries or other serious conditions. Do long-term care patients also need health IT tools to remain better engaged with their recovery and wellness goals?

Similar to other healthcare consumers, patients with a long road ahead of them often struggle to remain focused on their health. Whether patients are managing chronic illnesses, recovering from cancer treatments, or overcoming other medical conditions, the money and time necessary to remain dedicated to improving their health may be prohibitory.

 

Healthcare professionals from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital asked parents which technologies and tools help them better manage their child’s overall care. The patient portal was cited as a significant tool that assists parents with remaining engaged in their children’s care process.

 

In particular, the ability to track doctor appointments and request scheduling changes in the portal helped parents stay on track with their children’s care. The caretakers also gave several suggestions for improving the portal and providing tools that can enhance patient engagement. One suggestion asked for mobile device applications that will share patient activities and events information.

 

Additionally, it may benefit patients and their families to be alerted to schedule challenges, receive prompts at out-patient visits, and track test results as well as review medical terms. All of these capabilities can be achieved with optimal technologies and the implementation of upgraded patient portals.

 

While these suggestions are important to consider, they also show that patient portals may not be living up to their prior expectations. Results from a HIMSS Analytics survey shows that healthcare organizations may need to move beyond patient portals to get higher levels of patient engagement.

 

“Even if organizations have a vision for real patient engagement, many are consumed with checking the boxes for meaningful use,” Joe DeSantis, Vice President of HealthShare Platforms, InterSystems, said in a public statement. “Unfortunately, a patient portal based on a single EHR is not enough to move patient engagement forward. Engagement needs to span the entire care continuum. The short-term focus on meaningful use has often been at the expense of long-term strategic goals.”

 


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Laurie Bolick Wolf's curator insight, June 17, 2015 2:38 PM

Patient engagement refers to having patients be involved in their own healthcare.  The primary route of this has been through patient portals.  With a portal, patients can make appointments and communicate with their doctors, gain valuable educational material, and see lab and imaging results.  The EMR puts all this information in one place for the patient.  However, it depends on how involved the patient is in his/her own care.  The patient must create an account and select what information they want.  While I think it is a great idea in concept, it is not reaching the majority of patients who choose not to participate.

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Why are patients' using social media for health?

Why are patients' using social media for health? | Hospital IT | Scoop.it

POST SUMMARY:  We need to understand "why" patients are using social media for health, what THEY want and need and how social media impacts healthcare decision making. 61% of people want to make health decisions either on their own (26%) or with input from their doctor (38%). The proportion of people wanting to be “completely in charge of my decisions” rose 4 percentage points in one year, from 2011. This statistic skews younger, with 33% of people 25-34 and 31% of those 35-44 wanting to be “completely in charge.” Only 17% of those 55-64 felt like being totally in charge of their health care decisions.


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Infographic: How Mobile Health Use Is Changing | Hospital EMR and EHR

Infographic: How Mobile Health Use Is Changing | Hospital EMR and EHR | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
Mobile health apps and hardware offer intriguing possibilities, though it's hard for providers to tell what models and methods of use are going to stand out.
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INFOGRAPHIC: Top 10 Connected Health Trends for 2015

INFOGRAPHIC: Top 10 Connected Health Trends for 2015 | Hospital IT | Scoop.it

Connected health engages patients, members, providers, and the health community using technology to deliver quality care outside of the traditional medical setting. We have identified the top 10 connected health trends and highlighted them in the below infographic. For an in depth look at each trend check out our newly published guide on the Top 10 Connected Health Trends for 2015.


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GoDoctr.com's curator insight, May 28, 2015 3:49 AM

Key emerging trend is patients wants to connect with hospitals digitally to seek information as information available on the websites is not sufficient. Very few hospitals in India are geared up to cater to this need. It is only a matter of time that majority of hospitals will  have dedicated resources to manage their online helpdesk. 

Manav Chaudhary's curator insight, May 28, 2015 7:09 AM

It is about smarter and data driven decisions, spending resources after thinking through it and keeping customer at the centre of the decisions... Thanks for putting it together. 

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Patient Engagement Strategies Are about to Become Even More Critical

Patient Engagement Strategies Are about to Become Even More Critical | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
In order to make a dent in our readmission numbers, we need to redefine our patient engagement strategies.
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Healthcare Patient Portals: Millennials vs. Baby Boomers

Healthcare Patient Portals: Millennials vs. Baby Boomers | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
Millennials and baby boomers have vastly different healthcare needs and concerns. Here's how healthcare patient portals can engage both generations.

Via Giuseppe Fattori
Timothy Broderick's insight:

Key Insights

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Medical Device and Mobile Health Market to Reach $8 billion

Medical Device and Mobile Health Market to Reach $8 billion | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
The mobile health market is making headway and many industries around the world are stopping to take notice.

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8 ways to improve your patient experience

8 ways to improve your patient experience | Hospital IT | Scoop.it

The internet has added a whole new dimension to outside factors affecting a patient’s choice of care providers.

This is apparent by the fact that 82 percent of patients 50-plus now go to the internet for information on their care. CMS, Healthgrades and a host of other sites have made patient experience scores widely available. Social media has enabled people to expand their influence far beyond family and friends. Because Americans will tell twice as many people about a bad experience than a good one (White House Office of Consumer Affairs),it is more important than ever for physicians and hospitals to ensure patients not only receive excellent treatment, but their perception equals reality.

 

There are eight things you can do today to ensure your patient experience scores are high:

 

1. Realize you are in the ‘people’ business. Physicians and hospitals see their role as treating symptoms or illnesses, often losing sight of the person being treated. To ensure you provide the best care, consider what the person behind the treatment feels or needs.

 

2. Involve the patient. Today’s healthcare model requires patients to take a greater role in their treatment. Make sure you thoroughly discuss the pros and cons of the various treatment options so the patient will make the most informed decision without second thoughts.

 

3. Over communication. Regardless of how effective or efficient the treatment is, if patients do not know what to expect they will remain concerned throughout the process. By keeping them informed at every step, you are providing the reassurance they need to feel good about their experience.

 

4. Consider your audience. When communicating to patients, consider how your patients like to receive their information. Do you use email, telephone, or texts to remind patients of upcoming visits? Do you communicate with them between visits or provide educational materials?For some patients, there is nothing worse than to be given a pile of papers after an appointment. Most adults now prefer email or text messages, but you must ask to be sure.

 

5. Encourage questions. The best patients are actively engaged in their own care. Questions are the best way to gauge a patient’s level of understanding, and fill any gaps that may be present.

 

6. Look at all feedback as positive. According to “Understanding Customers” by Ruby Newell-Legner, only 4 percent of dissatisfied customers will voice their opinion while 91 percent will not come back. It is invaluable to uncover negative issues in your practice, so you can remedy the situation and keep more of your patients.

 

7. Coordinate services and visits. Whenever possible, combine visits or coordinate treatment to eliminate unnecessary visits. Patients and care givers are busy, and may be required to take off work for each appointment. Those with high deductibles or co-payments will look favorably on providers that help to lower their out-of-pocket expenses.

 

8. Work to get patients home sooner. The longer a patient stays in the hospital or a rehabilitation facility, the less satisfied they will be with their treatment. Programs with lower lengths of stay typically have higher scores.

 


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EmmanuelGrunenberger's curator insight, May 11, 2015 10:55 AM

Think about how many of those basics did you get last time in Hopistal?

Rescooped by Timothy Broderick from Technology in Business Today
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Top 10 Gadgets for Businessmen and Women

Top 10 Gadgets for Businessmen and Women | Hospital IT | Scoop.it
Whether you’re looking for that perfect gift for the businessman or woman in your life, or you’re a business person yourself who is interested in the latest tech on the market, these 10 gadgets are must-have items.

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