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L'entrée des nouvelles technologies à l'hôpital
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Smartphones for digital mental health 

Smartphones for digital mental health  | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it

Emerging technologies can offer real benefits to people with mental health difficulties 

 

Current smartphones are several times more powerful than the Cray-2 supercomputer, the 1980s fastest computer. Smartphones, have changed the game for digital interventions. These beloved tiny supercomputers present an opportunity for mental health to deliver ‘ecological; momentary’ interactions (EMIs) in harmony with the fabric of people’s lives.

 

Ecological momentary interventions (EMIs) are treatments that are provided to people during their everyday lives (i.e. in real time) and in natural settings (i.e. real world) (Heron & Smyth, 2010).

 

Often in mental health when thinking about the development of health apps we find ourselves struggling to fully conceptualise what it is we are attempting to do and why.

 

“Ecological momentary interventions for depression and anxiety” by Schueller et al (2017) brings together some useful ways of thinking about apps for mental health and how we might understand them.

 

The authors are keen that we review where we have been with digital mental health apps so that we might begin to develop a far more exciting digital mental health future. The paper includes a number of ideas useful to those of us looking to understand and develop ways of making people’s lives better using digital technologies. The paper also makes a number of useful distinctions between different types of interactions between patients and technology and explores how we might better understand them.  

 

Smartphones make new kinds of health intervention possible. Rather than sitting down to do a health related task, interventions can be quick and take place in the context of other everyday activities.

 

We make momentary ecological interventions with our smartphones hundreds of times a day; from firing off a quick email to checking our bank balance. Once the threshold for digital health was Ecological Momentary Assessments (EMAs).

 

Such assessments might encourage people to answer a question about their current feelings or asking people to measure something such as heart rate or blood sugar, extending the ‘window of observation’ into people’s lives and allowing the collection of data by asking people to feedback via an app.

 


In the paper, Schueller et al discuss methods of understanding what digital interventions for depression and anxiety actually are, ways of evaluating these interventions and report recent evidence for the efficacy of such interventions. Their paper also suggests a future path for digital mental health application development.
A brave new world?


Schueller et al make it clear that smartphone technology has extended the horizon of possibility for treatment and also for the monitoring or tailoring of treatment because modern apps can both measure our responses to interventions and also modify those interventions in light of direct feedback. 


The authors set out a compelling vision of the future of digital mental health interventions where “advances in EMIs are likely to take us one step closer to personal digital mental health assistants.

 

These assistants will listen to people through sensed data, learn from people in the context of their daily lives, and guide people in directions that will support their mental health.

 

Such personal digital mental health assistants will still be made up of combinations of interventions, decision points, tailoring rules, and decision rules but powered by advances in technologies and analytics that make each of these more personalized and more data-driven.”

 

more at http://mhealth-weekly.dub.io/ecological-momentary-interventions-smartphones-for-digital-mental-health

 


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Geoffrey Cooling's curator insight, August 5, 2017 11:12 AM
Interesting article on the use of smartphones for mental health
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Connected Health Study Finds Mobile Health Improves Patient Engagement

Connected Health Study Finds Mobile Health Improves Patient Engagement | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it
Mobile health can positively impact patient engagement, clinical outcomes, and operational workflow in remote monitoring programs according to recent study.

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Will Google Glass catch on in healthcare? | mHIMSS

Will Google Glass catch on in healthcare? | mHIMSS | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it

It's probably the most anticipated and potentially transformative new gadget since the smartphone. But unlike the iPhone, Google Glass has also been heralded with a healthy dose of controversy.

Although few have managed to get their mitts on a pair, lots of people have some pretty passionate ideas about what the technology – which enables hands-free Web and camera access – will mean, for healthcare and society at large.

 


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Study looks at mobile medical app overload and has suggestions to correct the problem

Study looks at mobile medical app overload and has suggestions to correct the problem | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it
Are we at the point of 'app overload'? A recent paper argues that we are, and makes suggestions on how to fix the problem.

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RareConnect: Online global patient network for Rare Diseases

RareConnect: Online global patient network for Rare Diseases | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it

RareConnect.org, the successful, growing online network for rare disease communities, brings together thousands of patients, families, and groups who might otherwise be isolated.


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Tracking Health Indicators: The Role of mHealth Technologies in Improving Outcomes | HealthWorks Collective

Tracking Health Indicators: The Role of mHealth Technologies in Improving Outcomes | HealthWorks Collective | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it
By tracking health indicators such as blood pressure, heart rate, daily weights and blood sugars (among others) patients can see the impact of interventions such as diet, exercise and drug therapy. Seeing results in real time can be very motivating.

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Walgreens introduces API for mobile prescription refills | mobihealthnews

Walgreens introduces API for mobile prescription refills | mobihealthnews | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it

Pharmacy chain Walgreens, which already has one of the most popular mobile health apps out there, has released an application programming interface(API) so software developers can build the company’s prescription scanning and refilling technology into their own apps.


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Medical Devices Are the Next Security Nightmare

Medical Devices Are the Next Security Nightmare | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it
Dick Cheney ordered changes to his pacemaker to better protect it from hackers. Johnson & Johnson warned customers about a security bug in one of its insulin pumps last fall.

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EruditeLifestyle's curator insight, March 10, 2017 1:27 AM

Maybe we should switch back to paper

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Meeting the Mobile Demands of the Healthcare Industry

Meeting the Mobile Demands of the Healthcare Industry | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it
As clinicians bring their own mobile devices to work, IT leaders must provide functionality while keeping data safe.

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Hello Doctor Helps Patients Navigate Complex Medical Conditions

Hello Doctor Helps Patients Navigate Complex Medical Conditions | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it
A missing link in the personal management of health information I'm confused. That's one of the most important insights around patients and caregivers who find themselves lost in the complexities of healthcare.

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Sam Stern's curator insight, June 11, 2013 6:36 AM

This looks like a nice attempt at PHR.  Hopefully this Beta launch will gain some traction.

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Applying mobile health strategies to drive greater patient engagement and provider accountability. | mHIMSS

Applying mobile health strategies to drive greater patient engagement and provider accountability. | mHIMSS | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it

Patient engagement and physician accountability are the cornerstones of today’s value-based care models. These strategies encourage patients to take an active role in their own health while offering the necessary incentives for providers to deliver effective, personalized health oversight and care to their patient population. By encouraging and pursuing these initiatives, population health can be improved by supporting patients both within and outside of the clinical setting. This is especially true when serving chronically ill populations, where these approaches can help prevent costly complications and acute care admissions.


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6 reasons why a hospital app is a must

6 reasons why a hospital app is a must | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it
90 percent of millennials check their smartphones in the morning.  With the increasing popularity of smartphones, brands everywhere are either releasing apps or wondering if they should. The health sector has even dubbed a whole new industry "mHealth" because of the potential smartphones offer. If you are a hospital marketer, does it make sense to create an app now? Stats and facts seem to say a resounding yes. Here are 5 arguments for hospital health apps.

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Let Patients Help | The New Excellence: Consumerism Comes To The Medical Market - Forbes

Let Patients Help | The New Excellence: Consumerism Comes To The Medical Market - Forbes | Hopital 2.0 | Scoop.it
Partnership: the model of the Society for Participatory Medicine “Let Patients Help” is not just the title of this blog, it’s the catchphrase of my cause.

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ET Russell's curator insight, February 8, 2013 4:34 PM

Love this quote in the article:
"I’m an e-patient: equipped, enabled, empowered, engaged. I’m no clinician, but I do everything in my power to help them, to play an active role in my own care, and even in the design of care."