Homo Numericus Bis
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Homo Numericus Bis
humanités numériques
Curated by Mlik Sahib
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The #Algorithmic City | #smartcities #opendata

The #Algorithmic City | #smartcities #opendata | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it
:snips - We Scale Cities

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luiy's curator insight, July 10, 2014 6:00 AM

What else can we predict? In theory, any event that is not random, provided we have enough data to model the context. Examples include passenger load in public transports, availability of parking spots, traffic jams, waste production, energy consumption and revenues of a shop in a specific street. These all share a common underlying principle: use context rather than history to predict behavior.

 

In themselves, each of these predictions could lead to amazing new products and services. The real power though comes from integrating everything together and modeling an entire city and its interactions with people. For instance, if you can predict where people will need to go tomorrow, then you can create optimal bus routes, minimizing time to destination and walking distance, taking into account predicted traffic, weather and garbage collection schedules. In this ideal system, all services would be optimal and available to citizens at anytime. We call this new way of designing cities "Algorithmic Urbanism".

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Developing Data Journalists in the Developing World | #opendata #DDJ

Developing Data Journalists in the Developing World | #opendata #DDJ | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it
Source - Journalism Code, Context & Community

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Mlik Sahib's insight:

"Data availability, data and digital literacy, and the media environment largely dictate the direction data projects can take in any given place. Over the next few months we will be launching data journalism projects focused on:

the environment and food safety in China, where we will rely on an online discussion forum to provide support between weekend training sessions;a combination of a boot camp and mentored reporting projects for election reporting in Afghanistan; andpartnerships between journalists and NGOs for human rights reporting in Nicaragua.

All these projects are focused on cultivating data communities that will prepare journalists to thrive, working within their local context with the resources they have available. It’s not within our reach to foster an entire new generation of journo-coders: what we can do is pool available talent from different sectors to coalesce into a data community. Working together with other local incubators, we hope to eventually offer fellowships in other countries to help journalists—like our fellows in Kenya—become analytical thinkers with a news-nose for data stories and a willingness to work with the nascent data community to get the story out, both in and outside the newsroom."

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luiy's curator insight, March 10, 2014 5:46 PM

Developing Data, Skills & Community

 

To grow our data community we needed both an online incubator for data access and offline incubator for training and community building. Our flagship site, the Data Dredger, is a resource for Kenyan journalists to download, embed, and publish visualizations of Kenyan data. Our first task was to accumulate enough data for journalists to tell stories relevant to their audiences. Many exercises in the training work relied on World Bank or UN data for country-level analysis, but this data is hardly compelling for your average Kenyan media consumer, who is more concerned with his or her family or community than with global trends; they want to know how many mothers die prematurely in their community as compared to one county—not one country—over. Journalists can access Kenya-specific visualizations on our site. We produced Politics of Health ahead of the 2013 Kenyan presidential elections to fact-check candidates’ campaign promises, and visualized areas of malarial risk, maternal mortality, and anti-retroviral shortages. The Data Dredger was the only finalist from Africa in the 2013 Data Journalism Awards.

Catherine Pascal's curator insight, March 16, 2014 9:06 AM

 Essentiel ;-)  Merci de la transmission P. Levy ;-) 

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Making Sense of #Data - Course Google #MOOc | #datajournalism

Making Sense of #Data - Course Google #MOOc | #datajournalism | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it

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luiy's curator insight, February 28, 2014 5:52 AM

Making Sense of Data 

 

Do you work with surveys, demographic information, evaluation data, test scores, or observation data? Are you interested in making the data you collect more useful by organizing it, analyzing it, and applying it in different ways?

 

This self-paced, online course is intended for anyone who wants to learn more about how to structure, visualize, and manipulate data. This includes student, educators, researchers, journalists, and small business owners.

 

 

DATES

 

The course is available from March 18 - April 4, 2014 with support from peers and Google content experts.

 

 

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The diaspora* Project | #socialmedia #opendata #privacy

The diaspora* Project | #socialmedia #opendata #privacy | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it

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luiy's curator insight, November 3, 2013 7:54 AM

Decentralization

Instead of everyone’s data being contained on huge central servers owned by a large organization, local servers (“pods”) can be set up anywhere in the world. You choose which pod to register with - perhaps your local pod - and seamlessly connect with the diaspora* community worldwide.

 

Freedom

You can be whoever you want to be in diaspora*. Unlike some networks, you don’t have to use your real identity. You can interact with whomever you choose in whatever way you want. The only limit is your imagination. diaspora* is also Free Software, giving you liberty to use it as you wish.

 

Privacy

In diaspora* you own your data. You do not sign over any rights to a corporation or other interest who could use it. With diaspora*, your friends, your habits, and your content is your business ... not ours! In addition, you choose who sees what you share, using Aspects.

 

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City #Dashboard Amsterdam | #opengob #opendata #smartcities

City #Dashboard Amsterdam | #opengob #opendata #smartcities | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it

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Mlik Sahib's insight:
"General Information

 

Welcome to the City Dashboard! This platform shows you what is going on in Amsterdam at this moment.

The city in graphics

What is the average speed of traffic in the city? How many cultural events are going on? What are the levels of noise and what are people tweeting about? Answers to these and many other questions are featured and visualized in this dashboard of Amsterdam. Play and experiment with it, make different combinations and get to know the city real-time!

Translating data into accessible information

Citizens and (government) agencies create and collect a lot of data, which they are now opening up for reuse more and more. This dashboard makes use of the latest open data from a wide range of municipal services. By using the Linked Data API from the CitySDK project , this City Dashboard becomes easily transferable to other cities using the same interface. The CitySDK Linked Data API also makes information searchable and available on demand, enabling developers to create applications such as this dashboard.

How to use the City Dashboard

A city consists of many elements, shown on this dashboard as the following domains: transport, environment, statistics, economy, social, cultural & security. For each domain, the actual status is shown, based on blocks of 24 hours. The data is refreshed every 10 seconds. The information is captured in charts, graphs and on a map of the city. Larger dots and darker colors symbolize higher values and vice versa. On the map, you can choose which layers you want to see: from only one domain to interesting combinations and all of them together. Personalize what you are seeing and try to discover the city of Amsterdam on a whole new level!

No data available?

We aim to display all the numbers, graphics and other results in this City Dashboard as readable as possible. Since this platform collects data from different kind of sources that otherwise are stored in multiple databases, it may happen that particular data isn't available for a moment. In that case the data source is interrupted."

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luiy's curator insight, May 24, 2014 7:27 AM

The city in graphics

 

What is the average speed of traffic in the city? How many cultural events are going on? What are the levels of noise and what are people tweeting about? Answers to these and many other questions are featured and visualized in this dashboard of Amsterdam. Play and experiment with it, make different combinations and get to know the city real-time! 

 

 

 

How to use the City Dashboard

 

A city consists of many elements, shown on this dashboard as the following domains: transport, environment, statistics, economy, social, cultural & security. For each domain, the actual status is shown, based on blocks of 24 hours. The data is refreshed every 10 seconds. The information is captured in charts, graphs and on a map of the city. Larger dots and darker colors symbolize higher values and vice versa. On the map, you can choose which layers you want to see: from only one domain to interesting combinations and all of them together. Personalize what you are seeing and try to discover the city of Amsterdam on a whole new level! 

luiy's curator insight, June 11, 2014 6:20 AM

Translating data into accessible information

 

Citizens and (government) agencies create and collect a lot of data, which they are now opening up for reuse more and more. This dashboard makes use of the latest open data from a wide range of municipal services. By using the Linked Data API from the CitySDK project , this City Dashboard becomes easily transferable to other cities using the same interface. The CitySDK Linked Data API also makes information searchable and available on demand, enabling developers to create applications such as this dashboard. 

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Now available: Planning for #BigData | #opendata #freebook

Now available: Planning for #BigData | #opendata #freebook | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it
Planning for Big Data is a new book that helps you understand what big data is, why it matters, and where to get started.

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Mlik Sahib's insight:
Where to start?

"Every revolution has to start somewhere, and the question for many is “how can data science and big data help my organization?” After years of data processing choices being straightforward, there’s now a diverse landscape to negotiate. What’s more, to become data driven, you must grapple with changes that are cultural as well as technological.

Our aim with Strata is to help you understand what big data is, why it matters, and where to get started. In the wake the recent conference, we’re delighted to announce the publication of our “Planning for Big Data” book. Available as a free download, the book contains the best insights from O’Reilly Radar authors over the past three months, including myself, Alistair Croll, Julie Steele and Mike Loukides.

“Planning for Big Data” is for anybody looking to get a concise overview of the opportunity and technologies associated with big data. If you’re already working with big data, hand this book to your colleagues or executives to help them better appreciate the issues and possibilities."

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luiy's curator insight, March 3, 2014 5:40 PM

" thanks to an open source project called Hadoop, commodity Linux hardware and cloud computing, this power is in reach for everyone. A data revolution is sweeping business, government and science, with consequences as far reaching and long lasting as the web itself. "


Our aim with Strata is to help you understand what big data is, why it matters, and where to get started. In the wake the recent conference, we’re delighted to announce the publication of our “Planning for Big Data” book. Available as a free download, the book contains the best insights from O’Reilly Radar authors over the past three months, including myself, Alistair Croll, Julie Steele and Mike Loukides.

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Delivering on the promise of open government data #opengob #opendata

Delivering on the promise of open government data #opengob #opendata | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it
The open data vision is a bold one but it will take considerable work to make a reality. What impact has it really made so far?

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luiy's curator insight, November 7, 2013 5:55 PM

Our research finds that 55% of countries surveyed have open data initiatives in place, yet less than 10% of key government datasets across the world are truly open for reuse. It also found that valuable but potentially controversial datasets – such as company registers and land registers – are among the least likely to be openly released. This could be because governments want to preserve lucrative access charges, or from a desire to keep a lid on politically sensitive information, or both. However, the net effect is to severely limit the accountability, development and economic benefits of open data. The barometer ranks the UK as the most advanced country, scoring above the US (2nd), Sweden (3rd), New Zealand (4th) and Denmark and Norway (joint 5th). The leading developing country is Kenya, joint 22nd with the Czech Republic and Switzerland .

 

The barometer also highlights that strong evidence on the impacts of OGD is almost universally lacking. Few OGD programmes have yet been formally evaluated, and the majority of discussion surrounding impacts remains anecdotal. Our research asked about six kinds of OGD impact (government efficiency, transparency and accountability, environmental sustainability, inclusion of marginalised groups, economic growth, and supporting entrepreneurs) and in countries no examples of impact could be found, and on average evidence of impact was scored at just 1.7 out of 10.

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How #open is your government? Get the data | #opengob #opendata

How #open is your government? Get the data | #opengob #opendata | Homo Numericus Bis | Scoop.it
As the Open Government Partnership summit opens in London, take a look at the global picture with some data downloads

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luiy's curator insight, October 31, 2013 1:08 PM

The open budget survey from the International Budget Partnership scores 100 countries on the availability and accessibility of key documents throughout the budgeting process – it is not enough to simply publish the final budget to get a high score. Top performers in the 2012 open budget index: New Zealand, South Africa, the UK, Sweden and Norway. Bottom of the list: Equatorial Guinea, Myanmar, Qatar, Benin, and Saudi Arabia.