Queer Exploration
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Homosexualidad en la Cultura Occidental
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Feminism, the Family, and the Politics of the Closet : Lesbian and Gay Displacement

Feminism, the Family, and the Politics of the Closet : Lesbian and Gay Displacement | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it
How has feminism failed lesbianism? What issues belong at the top of a lesbian and gay political agenda? This book answers both questions by examining what lesbian and gay subordination really amounts to.
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The Origins and Role of Same-Sex Relations In Human Societies

The Origins and Role of Same-Sex Relations In Human Societies | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it

This groundbreaking work draws on a vast range of research into human sexuality to demonstrate that homosexuality is not a phenomenon limited to a small minority of society, but is an aspect of a complex sexual harmony that the human race inherited from its animal ancestors. Through a survey of the patterns of sexual expression found among animals and among societies around the world, and an examination of the functional role homosexual behavior has played among animal species and human societies alike, the author arrives at some provocative conclusions: that a homosexual or bisexual phase is a normal part of sexual development, that same-sex relations play an important balancing role in regulating human reproduction, that many societies have institutionalized homosexual traditions in the past, and that the harsh condemnation of homosexuality in Western society is a relatively recent phenomenon, unique among world societies throughout history.

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Lovers' Legends

Lovers' Legends | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it
First comprehensive uncensored collection of homosexual Greek myths in years. Lucians Different Loves, an unabashed debate on gay vs. straight love, frames richly illustrated stories of Hercules, Orpheus, Narcissus, others.
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Roman Sexualities

Roman Sexualities | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it
This collection of essays seeks to establish Roman constructions of sexuality and gender difference as a distinct area of research, complementing work already done on Greece to give a fuller picture of ancient sexuality.
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Homoeroticism and Chivalry: Discourses of Male Same-Sex Desire in the 14th Century

Homoeroticism and Chivalry: Discourses of Male Same-Sex Desire in the 14th Century | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it
Richard E. Zeikowitz explores various discourses of male same-sex desire in diverse 14th century chivalric texts and describes the sociopolitical forces motivating those discourses.
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Civil partnership, medieval style: In the days when same-sex marriage was a Christian rite

Civil partnership, medieval style: In the days when same-sex marriage was a Christian rite | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it
Research by historians shows there have been same-sex unions in Christian churches since medieval times.
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Gay’s To Blame For The Fall Of The Roman Empire

Gay’s To Blame For The Fall Of The Roman Empire | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it

  It’s causing a stir all over Europe, gays were to blame for the fall of the Roman Empire,  or at least that’s what one top Italian academic believes.

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WHEN SAME-SEX MARRIAGE WAS A CHRISTIAN RITE

WHEN SAME-SEX MARRIAGE WAS A CHRISTIAN RITE | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it

A Kiev art museum contains a curious icon from St. Catherine's Monastery on Mt. Sinai in Israel. It shows two robed Christian saints. Between them is a traditional Roman ‘pronubus’ (a best man), overseeing a wedding. The pronubus is Christ. The married couple are both men.

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Homosexuality (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

As has been frequently noted, the ancient Greeks did not have terms or concepts that correspond to the contemporary dichotomy of ‘heterosexual’ and ‘homosexual’. There is a wealth of material from ancient Greece pertinent to issues of sexuality, ranging from dialogues of Plato, such as the Symposium, to plays by Aristophanes, and Greek artwork and vases. What follows is a brief description of ancient Greek attitudes, but it is important to recognize that there was regional variation. For example, in parts of Ionia there were general strictures against same-sex eros, while in Elis and Boiotia (e.g., Thebes), it was approved of and even celebrated (cf. Dover, 1989; Halperin, 1990).

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Gay marriage and homosexuality were part of moral landscape in Ancient Rome

Gay marriage and homosexuality were part of moral landscape in Ancient Rome | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it
Gay marriage was, along with homosexuality, something the first Christians faced as part of the pagan moral darkness of their time.
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Saint Aelred the Queer: The Surprising History of Homosexuality and Homophobia

Homosexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome

A myth commonly held in conservative Christian religious groups is that Greece and Rome fell when their acceptance of homosexuality arose, and that the resulting "immorality" was a primary cause of their fall.

The reality is quite different. Neither Greek nor Roman cultures began their decline with an increased tolerance of homosexuality; rather it was quite the opposite.

Homosexuality among the Greeks has been the subject of a great deal of scholarly study over the years, with the result that it is widely accepted among the American public that it was common. What is not as widely known, however, is that it was as common among the Roman population, and took much the same form.

Much has been written of pederastry among the Greeks, but the reality is that while common among the military occupations, the familiar forms that homosexuality takes among Americans was the rule among the Greeks and Romans as well.

The fact is that the concept of gender was very, very different among the Greeks and Romans. The notion that a person was "male" or "female" in gender as well as sex is one that had not currency among these ancients. They recongnized, as we often do not, that a person may well not see themselves as "macho" or "feminine," but rather a combination of the traits.

As a result, it did not seem at all unusual among the ancients for two men or two women to get together and form a family unit. Marriage between members of the same sex was common, accepted, and not considered different or unusual at all, because gender was not identified strictly with sex as it is among modern Europeans and Americans.

Therefore, the idea of seeing two men hugging, kissing and showing great affection, even passion for each other in public is a notion that would not have stirred any more interest among the ancients that such behavior between members of the opposite sex would for us.

It is not surprising, then, that the ancient Greeks and Romans have left us a rich heritage of literature celebrating such relationships. Stories are legion of the deep passion and love such couples had for each other.

While some authors have attempted to show that homosexuality was prosecuted in ancient Rome, the fact is that no surviving account of prosecution for a homosexual relationship, prior to the Christian era, survives. Those examples that purport to show such prosecutions, on close examination show that the victim was a minor - and the prosecution is for pedophilia, not for homosexuality. Indeed, there are plenty of examples of prosecution for adultery, and many for pedophilia, but not a single case for homosexuality.

Cicero, one of the greatest of Roman jurists, speaks endlessly of Roman law, including in detail those statutes dealing with sexual relations, but nowhere does he mention homosexuality. Cicero ridicules many prominent citizens for having been male prostitutes during their youth, but nowhere does he indicate that it was illegal, and in one case, in defending one Cnaeus Plancius from the charge that he had taken a male lover into the country to have sex with him, he states categorically that "this is not a crime."

In Augustinian Rome, not only was male prostitution allowed, but it was even taxed. A Roman historian of the era, Martial, not only mentions many prominent citizens and their male lovers by name, but admits to having engaged in such activities himself, and comments on it without the least evidence of shame.

While the general theory that tolerance of homosexuality increased as Rome began its decline, the fact is that the opposite is true. During the period of the Roman republic, when Rome was genuinely governed by the Senate, there was far greater tolerance of homosexuality, with the result that it was generally ignored in official documents. Because persecution began under the empire, more and more official references to it began to appear in legal documents, hence the belief by some historians, that it became more common. When one examines civil, secular documents, however, one sees that the opposite trend is the case.

The reality is that there is no evidence whatever that during the republican era, up through the beginning of the empire, for any recognition in Roman law for any difference between homosexual or heterosexual sex, or for that matter, even marriage.

That all began to change, however, with the "conversion" of the Emperor Constantine to Christianity.

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Sex, Gods and Gay People Underlying The Myths - Inner Work With Paul Chirumbolo

The whole of the telling of GANYMEDE's story, the mortal boy whose beauty excited the desire of the Greek God ZEUS, is akin to that of the daughters of memory, the MUSES, connecting not only the souls of the lovers to each other, united in their bodies and their minds, but also to the fact that the goddesses and gods themselves are embodied in the forces of life itself.

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THE SATYRICON, Complete

THE SATYRICON, Complete | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it

TheSatyriconis the most celebrated prose work to have survived from the ancient world. It can be described as the first realistic novel, the father of the picaresque genre. It recounts the sleazy progress of a pair of literate scholars as they wander through the cities of the southern Mediterranean in the age of Nero, encountering en route type-figures whom the author wishes to satirize. P.G. Walsh captures the spirit of the original in this new and lively translation. His introduction and detailed notes provide the reader with a comprehensive guide to the meanings and intentions of the story and the later history of its literary influence.

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Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it
Written by four leading authorities on the classical world, here is a new history of ancient Greece that dynamically presents a generation of new scholarship on the birthplace of Western civilization.
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Queer Fictions of the Past

Queer Fictions of the Past | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it
This is the first book to look at how lesbians and gays use history to define themselves as social, cultural, and political subjects. Bravmann shows how historical representations are dynamic conversations between past and present, creating individual and collective meanings. Exploring the theoretical and political ramifications of this project, he considers how historiography, ancient Greece, the Stonewall riots, and postmodern historical texts inform and reflect race, gender, class, and political differences in queer subjectivity..
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Homosexuality in Ancient Athens

Homosexuality in Ancient Athens | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it
Homosexuality in Ancient Athens is dedicated to all readers who desire to know more about the homosexual life style of the ancient Athenian men and women.
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Among Women

Among Women | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it

Women's and men's worlds were largely separate in ancient Mediterranean societies, and, in consequence, many women's deepest personal relationships were with other women. Yet relatively little scholarly or popular attention has focused on women's relationships in antiquity, in contrast to recent interest in the relationships between men in ancient Greece and Rome. The essays in this book seek to close this gap by exploring a wide variety of textual and archaeological evidence for women's homosocial and homoerotic relationships from Greece to Egypt.

Drawing on developments in feminist theory, gay and lesbian studies, and queer theory, as well as traditional textual and art historical methods, the contributors to this volume examine representations of women's lives with other women, their friendships, and sexual subjectivity. They present new interpretations of the evidence offered by the literary works of Sappho, Ovid, and Lucian; Bronze Age frescoes and Greek vase painting, funerary reliefs, and other artistic representations; and Egyptian legal documents.

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When A Medieval Knight Could Marry Another Medieval Knight

Eric Berkowitz's new book Sex And Punishment, out today from Counterpoint, is a fascinating survey of how legal systems over the millenia have attempted to regulate and police sex. In this excerpt, a discussion of the once-wide acceptance of same-sex unions between men in Europe of the Middle Ages.

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Why the Romans Are Important in the Debate About Gay Marriage

Continuing legislative measures attempting to ban gay marriage show that this issue, so critical in our last national election, remains a controversial topic. Since many of our political institutions are derived from ancient Roman precedents, a quick look at Roman laws regarding homosexuality serves to illustrate what may be driving some of the current controversy surrounding gay unions in the United States.

While the world of the ancient Greeks seems to have tolerated homosexuality (as seen in the poems of Sappho and the dialogues of Plato), that of the Romans was more cautious. Romans in the period of the Roman Republic and early empire tended to perceive the Greek acceptance of male homosexuality as less than male and, thus, literally unvirtuous (Vir being the Latin word for man). Indeed, a Roman term for effeminacy was “Graeculus”—“a little Greek!”

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Hadrian the gay emperor

Hadrian the gay emperor | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it
The bust is classically Roman, the face imperious. But this is no ordinary emperor.
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Homophobia in Ancient World Historical Fiction

What’s with all the homophobia in ancient world historical fiction and its close companion heroic fantasy?

Let me be clear about what I mean. It’s not that having a homophobic character, or depicting a homophobic scenario, is always a bad thing. It very well may be realistic for the character or the time period.

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Lover's Legends: The Gay Greek Myths

This book helped to strip away many of the misconceptions about same-sex love in the Classical world that had grown up during the nineteenth century and that were becoming commonplace with the growth of the Gay Liberation movement from the late 1960s. What Dover sought to demonstrate was that in Classical Athens, there was an institutionalised form of same-sex behaviour, whereby an older man (the ’εραστης, ‘desirer’) is inflamed with passion for a youth (the ’ερομενος, ‘the desired’) and eases his path into full adult life. He suggested that this almost ritualised ‘education’ of the youth might have deeper roots in a Primitive Indo-European initiation rite that has left traces in other cultures.

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DEATH AND THE LIBRARIAN · Jaume Pòrtulas

DEATH AND THE LIBRARIAN · Jaume Pòrtulas | Queer Exploration | Scoop.it

DEMETRIUS PHALEREUS: Between 317 BC and 307 BC, when he was despot of Athens, he had a boyfriend by the name of Diognis, of whom all the Athenian boys were jealous.

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