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Captain: Oklahoma City man killed by police was deaf

Captain: Oklahoma City man killed by police was deaf | Homeless Helping Homeless | Scoop.it
Oklahoma City police officers who opened fire on a man in front of his home as he approached them holding a metal pipe didn't hear witnesses yelling that he was deaf, a department official said Wednesday.

Magdiel Sanchez, 35, wasn't obeying the officers' commands before one shot him with a gun and the other with a Taser on Tuesday night, police Capt. Bo Mathews said at a news conference. He said witnesses were yelling "he can't hear you" before the officers fired, but they didn't hear them.

"In those situations, very volatile situations, you have a weapon out, you can get what they call tunnel vision, or you can really lock in to just the person that has the weapon that'd be the threat against you," Mathews said. "I don't know exactly what the officers were thinking at that point."

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Sam Unruh's comment, September 23, 2017 8:01 PM
It seems like he should have dropped the pipe when he saw the officers' guns drawn.
Hope Allen's comment, September 24, 2017 1:32 AM
While its awful that this is a thing that happens within the deaf community, I can also understand it from the perspective of police, so its a difficult topic to really discuss.
Occupy Journey's comment, September 24, 2017 11:54 AM
Aren't cops supposed to be trained to disarm? Are they also supposed to be trained to deescalate? The first shoot and ask questions later is so out of control.
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Captain: Oklahoma City man killed by police was deaf

Captain: Oklahoma City man killed by police was deaf | Homeless Helping Homeless | Scoop.it
Oklahoma City police officers who opened fire on a man in front of his home as he approached them holding a metal pipe didn't hear witnesses yelling that he was deaf, a department official said Wednesday.

Magdiel Sanchez, 35, wasn't obeying the officers' commands before one shot him with a gun and the other with a Taser on Tuesday night, police Capt. Bo Mathews said at a news conference. He said witnesses were yelling "he can't hear you" before the officers fired, but they didn't hear them.

"In those situations, very volatile situations, you have a weapon out, you can get what they call tunnel vision, or you can really lock in to just the person that has the weapon that'd be the threat against you," Mathews said. "I don't know exactly what the officers were thinking at that point."

Via Rob Duke
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Sam Unruh's comment, September 23, 2017 8:01 PM
It seems like he should have dropped the pipe when he saw the officers' guns drawn.
Hope Allen's comment, September 24, 2017 1:32 AM
While its awful that this is a thing that happens within the deaf community, I can also understand it from the perspective of police, so its a difficult topic to really discuss.
Occupy Journey's comment, September 24, 2017 11:54 AM
Aren't cops supposed to be trained to disarm? Are they also supposed to be trained to deescalate? The first shoot and ask questions later is so out of control.
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Mid-Hudson leaders slam federal decision to eliminate grant that has benefited local homeless veterans

Mid-Hudson leaders slam federal decision to eliminate grant that has benefited local homeless veterans | Homeless Helping Homeless | Scoop.it

U.S. Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney and local officials are condemning a decision by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to deny an anticipated annual federal investment of more than $500,000 to Hudson River Housing.

 

If the decision is not reversed, they said, funding will run out and the program will be terminated on Sept. 30.

 

Hudson River Housing will apply for an emergency, one-month extension to allow the organization to finish its existing cases. Local leaders are working together to appeal the decision or secure an extension.


Via Theresa "Tbird" Aldrich
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Police Chief Receives Complaints After Officers Saved Man From Overdosing

Police Chief Receives Complaints After Officers Saved Man From Overdosing | Homeless Helping Homeless | Scoop.it
On Monday, the day after the most recent case he received three calls – two males and one female.

“They did not identify themselves as residents, or not residents, but they were very angry and they wanted to know why I would expense dollars, time and effort to have my officers safe ‘drug addicts.’ And I was just amazed that I received these phones calls and they were very angry,” Weitzel said.

First he said grant money pays for it and he said ethically, if a police officer can save a life – and they are almost always there before paramedics – they absolutely should.

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Jessica Obermiller's comment, September 20, 2017 11:56 PM
I was a terrible alcoholic for many years. I know what it's like to be at the bottom. Speaking as someone who is now (nearly) six years sober, you never know when someone will turn themselves around. I would like to think if I had ever experienced alcohol poisoning or was dumb enough (and trust me, I was) to mix my medications with my drinking, if an officer was there, they would have saved my life. Also, speaking as a true Utilitarian, a life is a life is a life. I see no reason not to save someone, no mater if they are "drug addict" or an upstanding college professor. It really upsets me that anyone would find saving anyone else's life wrong for any reason. A life saved is a life saved, as simple as that. It doesn't matter who that person is.
Krista Scott's comment, September 26, 2017 3:32 AM
Last time I checked cops have the right to save someones life? I don't get what the fuss and the reason for a complaint being made. If it is not one thing then it is another.. I just think its comical because these are probably the same people who whine and cry that police are never there when they need them or that they aren't doing anything to help the drug problem
Krista Scott's comment, September 26, 2017 3:32 AM
Last time I checked cops have the right to save someones life? I don't get what the fuss and the reason for a complaint being made. If it is not one thing then it is another.. I just think its comical because these are probably the same people who whine and cry that police are never there when they need them or that they aren't doing anything to help the drug problem
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Partnership between Facebook and police could make planning protests ... - RT

Partnership between Facebook and police could make planning protests ... - RT | Homeless Helping Homeless | Scoop.it
Partnership between Facebook and police could make planning protests ...

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Careful what you tweet: Police, schools tap social media to track behavior - NBC News.com

A teenager who claimed "sarcasm" after talking on Facebook about shooting up a kindergarten spent months in jail this year for making a...

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Carol Hancox's curator insight, October 20, 2013 6:26 PM

Tool to help police monitor social media

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Police Officers Need to Accept the Risk That Comes With Showing Restraint

Police Officers Need to Accept the Risk That Comes With Showing Restraint | Homeless Helping Homeless | Scoop.it
My second inclination, though, is to say that it’s a police officer’s job to take risks the rest of us are unable or unwilling to take. That is why the vast majority of police officers, the ones who perform their duties admirably and selflessly, deserve our respect and admiration. The reason we revere cops isn’t their dedication to protecting their own lives. It’s their dedication to protecting ours.

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Rob Duke's curator insight, September 20, 2017 12:43 AM
I've made a similar argument under the idea of "don't be scared--go 10-8".
My thought was that we once said "hostages are bought and paid for", but then Columbine came along and officers decided that they couldn't justify letting kids die while we set up a perimeter and waited for a SWAT team.
I don't know where you  draw the line, though, and other officers took me to task for that...consider this:
1. Name an ethical system that demands that others must, without regard from their own safety or free will, risk their lives.  We do so for the military, but that's a different system covered under different law and different ethics than a civilian system.
2. What about an officer's family?  Must they also be subjected to an involuntary loss of their family member? What about the other financial losses (their standard of living is never the same afterwards)?
3. Can you pay enough to encourage civilians to be willing to lay down their lives; and would you want those people as your protectors?  What's the endgame with a "priesthood" of true believer officers?  I'm not sure I like the idea of a bunch of zealot's in charge of policing.  Our entire system is built on the idea that "men are not angels (nor will they ever be)", thus we're better off to build a system of checks and balances and then allow (nay encourage) everyone to engage in "enlightened self-interest".  

What are your thoughts?

See Adam Smith, de Toqueville, Federalist 51, and Frederick Hayek for more.


Hope Allen's comment, September 24, 2017 1:35 AM
This its an interesting topic. Personally, if I was a cop, I would do my job well and I would do my best to help those around me. However, Im not sure that I would put myself at serious risk if that was not necessarily my job at a certain point. Simply due to my family and my own want to live.
Occupy Journey's comment, September 24, 2017 11:50 AM
But isn't THAT "serving and protecting"? I always thought that was supposed to be their job anyway.
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Harrowing Story of CHP Officer Stabbed Seven Times Saving Suicidal Man From Death

Harrowing Story of CHP Officer Stabbed Seven Times Saving Suicidal Man From Death | Homeless Helping Homeless | Scoop.it

RIVERSIDE, Calif. – This is a harrowing story of a California Highway Patrol officer stabbed seven times while saving a suicidal man from certain death.
Harrowing Story
CHP Officer Dane Norem rushed out of his car, sprinted to the curb, jumped and grabbed the suicidal man by the ankle just as he straddled the top of the overpass fence. A busy highway roared beneath them.
If Norem let go, the jumper would die. Cars would swerve and crash. Others might die too, reported Brett Kelman for the Desert Sun.
But a determined Norem wrapped the man’s leg in a bear hug and lifted his feet, using his body to anchor the jumper to the overpass. Unfortunately, the man had too much leverage for Norem to pull him off the fence, but Norem – a big cop loaded with gear – was too strong and too heavy for the man to yank free.
Suddenly, it was a tug-of-war between life and death.
Yet the jumper was armed with a knife, and in violent, desperation, he began to stab downward, slicing Norem in the process.
“When I got struck in the face, it didn’t really hurt,” Norem said. “It felt like I had been punched and it felt wet, like a water balloon had popped. I came to figure out later that was my eye.”


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Riley Westfall's comment, September 21, 2017 10:56 PM
Riley Westfall's Insight: What an amazing story. It is too bad heroic stories like this are not published more often.
Sam Unruh's comment, September 23, 2017 8:12 PM
I'm impressed that he was able to go back to patrol duty after his eye got sliced.
Krista Scott's comment, September 26, 2017 3:25 AM
This is truly sad and just shows how truly selfish some people are when it comes to willingly putting someones life in danger like this who is simply trying to help them from making a mistake. I think stories like this about cops are overlooked by the media a lot which fails to show how much they are willing to put on the line in order to save someones life or help someone in need. I have to say that I have the most respect for cops like this.
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Protests erupt after ex-cop acquitted in black man's death

Protests erupt after ex-cop acquitted in black man's death | Homeless Helping Homeless | Scoop.it
Protests broke out in St. Louis after former police officer Jason Stockley was acquitted Friday of first-degree murder in the 2011 shooting death of black driver Anthony Lamar Smith.

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Brianne Frame's comment, September 16, 2017 5:14 PM
This is a very sad situation, but as the officer said I think it is a overreaction of people looking for blame where there is none. I find it sad that even though these protest argue about the importance of preserving life well also harming potentially deadly objects at officers themselves.
Gregory Foster's comment, September 16, 2017 11:42 PM
I have a hard time with this situation. The officer was found not guilty and people are protesting because he was found innocent. They are upset that a life was taken and they want to hold somebody accountable. I understand that the investigators had issue with the gun in the vehicle. Yet there was no evidence showing that it was planted. The DNA on the gun was that of the officer and not the driver. This DOES NOT show that it was planted. It simply says that the DNA was not present. There are reasons why DNA may be absent from the gun. This article does not provide me with enough information to address that issue. The main issue that I have is that the whole incident started with a vehicle pursuit. A vehicle pursuit that was started by the suspect driver, the victim of the OIS. If the driver never fled then this whole thing would not have happened. That point is missed. Then, add the fact that the video does not show evidence being planted. It does not show enough information to prove the officer did something wrong. People have the right to be upset but in this case, in this one case there is not enough evidence to blame the officer. We should put the ultimate responsibility on the suspect. The person who had the absolute most control of the entire event.
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Police Officer on Dash-Cam Video: 'We Only Shoot Black People'

Police Officer on Dash-Cam Video: 'We Only Shoot Black People' | Homeless Helping Homeless | Scoop.it
A police officer was put on administrative duty after a dash-cam video surfaced in which the officer was heard making a racially insensitive remark. 

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Rob Duke's curator insight, August 31, 2017 11:12 AM
I'm sure he's not the first cop to make this type of sarcastic remark, but it will all depend on how he said it as to whether he survives the inquiry and is still employed.  He may have enough time on to just retire.
When I began my career in the mid-80's, I heard the old-timers complain about the changes that had happened in their careers and how it was time for them to retire.  I thought "suck it up: times change", but I have to admit that I began to feel the same thing by the end of my career.  I don't know if that's our way of dealing with our own "expiration date" or if we really aren't able to deal with complex change.
Hope Allen's comment, September 3, 2017 1:45 PM
While I can tell that the officer in question meant this comment as a sarcastic joke, he is still going to have to deal with the consequences of making comments like these. As law enforcement, he is held to a higher standard of moral obligation and is being watched by everyone around him constantly. He is human and makes mistakes, however his line of work has given others access to judge the things he says and does, especially while on duty.
Occupy Journey's comment, September 3, 2017 2:43 PM
A few years back, I was "held accountable" for making a comment that had NOTHING to do with what I got fired for. Why then shouldn't he be held accountable?
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BREAKING: Navy Seal Claims Top Brass Asked if They Will Disarm Americans

BREAKING: Navy Seal Claims Top Brass Asked if They Will Disarm Americans | Homeless Helping Homeless | Scoop.it

Former Navy SEAL Ben Smith warns that the Obama administration is asking top brass in the military if they would be comfortable with disarming U.S.


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Chief wants digging stopped in area where remains found

Chief wants digging stopped in area where remains found | Homeless Helping Homeless | Scoop.it
A Saskatchewan First Nations chief is calling on a pipeline company to stop digging in the area where ancient human remains were found.

Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
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Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson's curator insight, October 23, 2013 8:29 PM
Chief wants digging stopped in area where remains found. Aboriginal bones could be 1,000 years old