Does home recording boom = professional studio doom?
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Does home recording boom = professional studio doom?
Thanks to the latest recording softwares and DAW's being readily available to the general public, the use of home recording studios are booming. Is this growing trend affecting business in professional studios and changing the way the music industry is operated?
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The New York Times > Arts > Music > Home Sweet Studio

The New York Times > Arts > Music > Home Sweet Studio | Does home recording boom = professional studio doom? | Scoop.it
Making an album used to mean booking time in an expensive professional studio; now, it can be a matter of rolling out of bed and pressing a button.
Soulman's Daughter's insight:

This source is from the New York Times, a reputable and well-known news magazine, that entails a range of topics. In this article, an insight into the development and boom of the home recording studio, takes an informative and enlightening approach in engaging the reader. This article was written in 2005, however the information is still objective in natuer and relates to the topic involved. The writer was easy to verify, with a quick link to their name, showing their previous works and their credentials. The writer is centered in music for New York Times, and can be relied on for their consistency and reputation that they have gained. 

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Shad Wave's curator insight, August 16, 2013 8:22 PM

This article tells how more and more top 40 songs are starting to come home studios and not big studios.

Zack Seavey's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:38 PM

This article makes a good point that studios can cost up to a few hundred and hour, but then if you buy pro tools and the plug in interface its about $450. Over all its the lower cost that are beating the bigger companies. It paints a picture with actual artists doing it today and saving money.

Sean Rodriguez's curator insight, December 4, 2015 11:42 AM

This source is from the New York Times. It delves into how convenient home recording can be compared to recording in a studio. It also explores the mindset comparisons of the two. I believe this article shares just how much this can benefit the artist and can be a good thing.

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Spot The Difference

Spot The Difference | Does home recording boom = professional studio doom? | Scoop.it
Paul White's thoughts on what the difference is these days between project studio and professional studios.
Soulman's Daughter's insight:

This source comes from a very popular, and credible online magazine. Its material is presented in an unbiased and informative manner, providing the reader the ability to discern its own conclusions. The author is the edior in chief of Sound on Sound, and is consistent contributer that has gained a reputation for being reliable due to his knowledge in the field. This article was written in 2012, and is current and up-to-date. 

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Sean Rodriguez's curator insight, December 4, 2015 11:51 AM

This article discusses how spending money on reliable, high-quality gear can go a long way in benefitting the sound you get when recording, whether it's at a professional studio or at home. I believe this is crucial when deciding whether or not you want to spend the money to make a quality recording.

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Home recording studios challenge the majors | Tune In Music City | The Tennessean

Home recording studios challenge the majors | Tune In Music City | The Tennessean | Does home recording boom = professional studio doom? | Scoop.it
Soulman's Daughter's insight:

This article comes from a reputable source whose focus is within the music business. The author is easily verified on the website, and carries many followers on this blog. Its information provides two sides to the coin, ensuring its neutrality and objectivity in its standpoint. The article was written by an author involved in the music business, making this source reliable in regards to its accuracy of information.

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Shad Wave's curator insight, August 16, 2013 8:12 PM

My insight was just years ago there was not that many places that big artist go to recorde but now because of home studios there plenty places you could go now and there starting to really advertise it. and its hurting the big studios.

Yadaliz Rivera's curator insight, January 19, 2014 11:37 PM

In the recording industry, on a daily bases you see more artists and producers looking towards home studios instead of going to professional ones for many reasons. Accesibility is a big role player as is how easily a song or an album can now be recorded instead of the longer process that recording in a professional studio would take.

Zack Seavey's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:30 PM

I have to say this article really goes into how much the big studios are taking a hit. Now they are going to rent out some of their equipment just to keep money coming in. 

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Could home recording doom professional music studios?

Could home recording doom professional music studios? | Does home recording boom = professional studio doom? | Scoop.it
Inexpensive home recording equipment helps artists rise from outside the mainstream labels.
Soulman's Daughter's insight:

Although this source is not strictyl music orientated, its source is reputable in its newsworthy nature. The author, although not directly involved in the music business, provides a unique perspective from the outside regarding the relationship between home recording studios and its effects against professional studios. The writer provides information in an investigative manner, seeking out sources from both sides of the spectrum to engage the reader to think about their stance. The article was written in 2009. This website keeps its consistency and reputation up-to-date with current trends and events, making this source somewhat reliable. Although it is advised to read articles such as these with a a discerning mind, it is a great way to see a new perspective from somebody outside of the industry, without bias.

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Emilia Medhanie's curator insight, August 16, 2014 8:58 PM

Artist are saving money by recording at home. See how this is affecting Professional studios.

Jake Cohen's curator insight, October 8, 2014 12:53 PM

I found this article to be very informative. While neither the publication (Christian Science Monitor) nor the author specializes in the world of music and recording, both are part of very reliable news source. Also, the author includes quotes from people who are professionals and specialize in recording industry to provide the necessary expertise to make this article reliable. I felt like this article was also fairly unbiased in that, the author seemed to be almost moderation a debate on the issue of Home Recording Studios vs Profession Studios. He had quotes from both sides of the issue and used the information effectively to discuss the topic.

 

Sean Rodriguez's curator insight, December 4, 2015 11:35 AM

I believe this article brings some good information out about how many people are shifting from recording in traditional recording studios to now trying their hand in their own home with a computer. It brings up relevant material and some facts about spending on equipment.

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Recording: Can Award-Winning Recordings Be Made In A Home Studio? - Pro Sound Web

Recording: Can Award-Winning Recordings Be Made In A Home Studio? - Pro Sound Web | Does home recording boom = professional studio doom? | Scoop.it
A reasoned perspective plus thoughts from recording engineers Ed Cherney, George Massenburg and David Hewitt
Soulman's Daughter's insight:

This article provides a balanced view of whether home recording studios rival professional studios. It is factual, unbaised and comes from a reputable music magazine, with a large following. The author uses direct sources from those experienced in the industry, and gains a balanced perspective regarding this topic. The author is easily verified at the bottom of this article, listing his experience in the industry, making this source credible and reliable. This article was published this year, in May, making it current and up-to-date.

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Sean Rodriguez's curator insight, December 4, 2015 11:47 AM

This article really does a good job being factual and being seemlingly unbiased. There are good arguments for both sides here. It's often a question I have in my head. There are pros and cons to both sides. This article does a great job discussing those sides.

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The impact of home recording technologies

Soulman's Daughter's insight:

This fantastic article is accurate in providing objective information regarding the evolution of digital music and home recording software, and its impact on professional live studios. Many citations are used in this paper, are appropriately referenced, and current. This paper was written in 2009, so it still relates to today's issues of this topic. The author wrote this in an informative manner, and was generally neutral in its standpoint. This article was written by a University academic from the University of Brighton, who majored in music business. Although finding the author's information was a bit of a challenge, once found, it verified his authority to write a paper such as this. I find this most credible due to its neutrality, information and use of many current and known citations.

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Sean Rodriguez's curator insight, December 4, 2015 12:18 PM

This article again dives into home recording and how it's affecting the music world. I believe it's very objective and also looks, deeply, into how music is created in a home studio. I found this article particularly interesting and informative.