home schooling
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Scooped by Jenny Sloane
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Homeschooling in America - www.TampaBayParenting.com Tampa Bay Parenting Magazine

http://tampabayparenting.com Homeschooling in America- Tampa Bay Parenting Magazine Homeschooling in America- Tampa Bay Parenting Magazine, Parenting Expert ...
Jenny Sloane's insight:

The first thing that caught my attention in this video was the distinction between homeschooling and online schooling. To me, that seems like the same thing because if you are not being taught in a standard classroom I would consider that to be homeschooling. The first advantage they discuss in this clip is the flexibility that comes along with homeschooling. Although flexibility and freedom may seem nice, it also means a lot of responsibility to make sure the student is receving all the essential fundamentals of education. From all the content curration I have done on this topic, I feel like everyone emphasizes the advantages of a flexible schedule and field trip opportunities. However, at least in my educational career, field trips were a very small part of my education. Furthermore, whenever we went on field trips we would get assignments, but I would always rush through the work as quickly as possible just so I could explore and do whatever I wanted in my free time. In other words, as much as I loved field trips, there are very few trips that I would say I learned a great deal of information. I suppose it may be different if the field trip only consists of one child and one adult, but then I would argue that the child needs to spend more time interacting with other children in every day life.

Additionally, this clip made me realize that homeschooling may not be appropriate for all kids AND it may not be appropriate for all parents. From what I have researched, homeschooling seems like a very demanding job for the parents. You have to be incredibly organized and determined to get everything done. As discussed in the clip, it is also up to the parents to find opportunities for their children to socialize.They have to be willing to accept that homeschooling their children is more or less like a full time job; it is a huge time commitment. 

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Field Trip Ideas for Homeschooling Parents!

Field Trip Ideas for Homeschooling Parents! | home schooling | Scoop.it
Just because you are home schooling your children does not mean that you cannot go on field trips. In fact, it can be much easier to go on field trips and get more out of them than if you were in a
Jenny Sloane's insight:

I agree that field trips seem easier for homeschooling children because they have more flexibility with their schedules and routines. However, I always loved field trips not only to escape the normal routine of class, but also to spend time with my friends. In my opinion, that is a huge disadvantage for homeschooling kids because although they may be able to take more field trips, they are missing out on the social interactions with other kids. Furthermore, I think it is an interesting concept for homeschooling kids to go on field trips; I go to museums, the zoo, and day trips with my family all the time, but I would never call it a "field trip". This post also mentions going to the grocery store as a possible field trip, which I think is a little ridiculous. To me this seems like taking advantage of the freedoms of homeschooling by the parent running erands while strategically incorporating it into the curriculum just by calling it a field trip. This is just a blog post and no evidence that homeschooling field trips or "unconvenional" trips are effective or even successful. Furthermore, I feel like children are more likely to behave under teacher supervision as opposed to being with their parents or family. 

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Rescooped by Jenny Sloane from Methods and Materials for Gifted Education
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Hybrid home-schooling offers 'best of both worlds' - The Journal News | LoHud.com

Hybrid home-schooling offers 'best of both worlds' - The Journal News | LoHud.com | home schooling | Scoop.it
Hybrid home-schooling offers 'best of both worlds'
The Journal News | LoHud.com
So, instead of struggling through it at home, the Nashville mom takes a hybrid approach. ...

Via LuAnne Forrest
Jenny Sloane's insight:

I think this article adds a unique spin on homeschooling that I have never considered before. In my opinion, the biggest advantage to homeschooling is that students can learn material at their own pace. If they need to spend extra time on one subject, they have that flexibility. Furthermore, there are no other students to hold them back if they master a material very quickly. This hybrid method is also advantageous because if a parent is not comfortable teaching certain subjects, they can send their child to a private teacher or tutor that can better explain the material. Therefore, the parent does not have to struggle to teach a certain subject to his/her child, but the child will receive a better education from someone who is truly passionate and skilled on the material. Furthermore, this approach also allows children to get out of their homes and learn in different environments. In some cases, children may go and learn with other students, rather than just one on one. I would strongly advocate for this approach because it allows more social interaction for the students and for them to get out of the comfort of their homes every once in a while.  

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Rescooped by Jenny Sloane from Inclusive Education
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Modern-day home schooling is more social than it sounds - Daily Breeze

Modern-day home schooling is more social than it sounds - Daily Breeze | home schooling | Scoop.it
Modern-day home schooling is more social than it sounds Daily Breeze And the networks also serve as a resource for parents trying to navigate the home-school process — not only the legalities of individualized education, but outside classes or...

Via Marie Schoeman
Jenny Sloane's insight:

I scooped this article because my biggest critique about homeschooling is that I do not believe children receive adequate social interaction. Therefore, I was very curious to see what this article had to say. When I was in grade school, I think there was a  stigma for homeschooling children; I thought they lack social skills, hardly ever interact with other kids, and are overall a little weird. However, I know that is not really the case. This article makes me realize even more that homeschooled children do participate in social activities just like kids who attend public and private institutions. Furthermore, now that homeschooling is becoming increasingly popular, I do believe some stigmas against homeschoolers will continue to diminish. This is not the fist article or blog where I read that homeschooling kids regularly do attend classes at schools. I always thought that homeschooling students worked for 6 or 7 hours a day with either their parents or a tutor at their houses. To me, having students attend an school for even a couple of days out of the week makes it seem like a more formal form of education and it seems more legitimate. I do believe homeschooled children have the ability to succeed and learn just as much, if not more, than students who attend public or private schools, but I think it is a lot harder to succeed. I know I am biased because I have always really enjoyed school. Even though it there is a lot of work and tests, I have always loved learning in a group atmosphere and being able to have discussions and interact with all my peers and best friends. 

I also thought it was interesting to note how this article emphasized the use of technology as a means for parents to get in contact with each other and plan social events or even field trips for their children. I think the advances in technology will make homeschooling even more appealing to many people because there are abundant resources avaliable with just a click of a button. When I have kids, I do not think I will ever end up homeschooling them, but this article made me realize that it is not really all that different from traditional schooling. 

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Parenting

Parenting | home schooling | Scoop.it
| Creating Your Own Home School Curriculum / http://www.oursmallhours.com/2011/08/creating-your-own-home-school-curriculum.html
Jenny Sloane's insight:

I thought this pinterest post was very interesting. I never really considered the fact that there are tons of different curricula out there. I always just assumed most schools had the same standards and curriculum. Moreover, I just assumed everyone learned the way I have and the way I do now. But this is really eye opening to how much freedom comes along with homeschooling. I do not necessarily think that is a good thing, but nevertheless it allows the parents to teach (or find tutuors to teach) their children in whatever way they want. However, I am very skeptical because this article makes it seem like anyone can be teachers, which I disagree with. For example, the author of this post explained that he/she wasted almost $1000 on textbooks that did not end up working for that family. There are so many different resources avaliable, how would anyone know where to start with homeschooling? Although I believe this post is meant to be helpful and motivating towards homeschooling, I think it makes homeschooling look less appealing. Schools have set curriculum and trained professional teachers who have most likely been teaching for years. There is no doubt if you send your child to a public or private school, he or she will learn all the fundamentals and basic subjects in a fairly organized manner. Furthermore, the thought of designing one's own curriculum would scare me. I would constently be worried that I am leaving out crucial information and material. Although I do believe there are some advantages to homeschooling, this article raised more doubts in my mind. 

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Home-schooled students gain edge in US colleges...wow, time to consider home schooling??

Home-schooled students gain edge in US colleges...wow, time to consider home schooling?? | home schooling | Scoop.it
Surveys show university students taught at home perform better than peers from conventional schools.

Via littlebytesnews
Jenny Sloane's insight:

This was a very brief article, only a few sentences long that left me with many questions. What type of colleges are homeschooling kids attending? How do the students adjust to going to a university in social context? Are homeschooling kids able to adapt to real-world after college? One of my main concerns with homeschooling is that kids do not receive enough social interaction. I remember in high school, my soccer team played a group of homeschooling students who had formed their own team. I remember being surprised with how normal these girls at least appeared to be. I think there is a stigma assoicated with homeschooling kids. However, I think as homeschooling becomes increasingly popular this stigma will diminish. I still have many questions about the pros and cons to homeschooling, but this article highlights that homeschooling kids, on average, do succeed at least in colleges. 

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littlebytesnews's curator insight, April 24, 2013 10:08 PM

I would home school my sons, however one of them is so hard to discipline on my own I fear I'd spend more time disciplining him than teaching him and my other son. 

 

Perhaps I could try homeschooling our younger son, though he really enjoys school and being around his friends. My oldest has always been a more tempermental child, strong willed and has always done better around groups in a structured environment. It tends to keep him more focused and limited in his behavior. When he is on his own or with just family around he tends to lose focus easier and is too comfortable with his environment. 

 

I used to teach elementary students, from ages K-3 until I was about six months pregnant with my first son. Then I had some medical issues and feared having any other complications since I was considered a 'high risk' pregnancy because of my age. Thankfully they both turned out healthy and happy.

 

I really admire parents who successfully homeschool their children. I would love to be able to do the same with at least one of my sons. I just don't even know where to begin for one and then there is the fear of taking them from their friends at school. That is really the only time they have a lot of interaction with other kids because the kids who live around us tend to have family issues. One who is being raised by "two dads", who is over-sensitive and his dads tend to overreact. Our sons still play with them but you always have to wonder when they are going to come over and complain about whether my oldest called their son a name or not. 

 

Then the other boys in the neighborhood come from broken homes...they don't have both parents at home and are often split between homes, so they aren't always around and another set of boys we can't trust alone with our sons because they have done things we don't approve of and find inappropriate behavior. So it's hard to really trust other kids around them and find good friends for them, but at least the kids they see at school are in a controlled environment and less likely to get into trouble. 

 

Anyway, I didn't mean to ramble so much about my personal views/life but I really respect and admire parents who homeschool their kids and wish we could do the same. However, I have faith with our invovlement our children will still excell and go onto college, as both my husband and I did and neither of us were homeschooled. The key is staying involved in their school work and what is happening at school and speaking out against anything we disapprove of that's being taught or forced on them. God forbid they ever try pushing the homosexual agenda in our sons school. So far we have been pretty content with our sons school, considering it is a public school. But we did try to choose one that is known for academic excellence more than others. 

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Home-Schooled Children Score Higher on Tests

Home-Schooled Children Score Higher on Tests | home schooling | Scoop.it
When it comes to grades, new research suggests that home schooling is superior to a public-school education -- most of the time...

Via Sakis Koukouvis
Jenny Sloane's insight:

I think it is interesting that structured homeschooling children scored the highest on math and reading tests compared to other homeschooling children and public school kids. However, the fact that unstructured methods of homeschooling resulted in the lowest scores across all tests, illustrates the potential risk of homeschooling. If you know you have a standardized and structured method, this should not pose a problem, but there is always a possibility that in a home environment it will be hard to maintain structure. Although it is true that homeschooling provides more individualized attention, I would still argue that school is not all about education. I think it is just as important to learn how to work with others, manage your time, socialize with friends, and develop as an individual through education. I think these processes are a lot more challenging if you are always in the confines of your home. 

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