Hollywood Spectacles
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Film History of the 1950s

Film History of the 1950s | Hollywood Spectacles | Scoop.it

In the war against the television film makers started to add effects to their movies that can only be seen in the theater. By adding Cinerama, 3-D and Smell-O-Vision, CinemaScope and Widescreen formats.

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The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (trailer)

http://brutallo.com The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm trailer, in Cinerama!
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Forrest Gump Trailer (Movie release: July 6, 1994)

Forrest Gump is a movie shot in VistaVision.

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Widescreen vs. Fullscreen

just a video to show you the difference between widescreen and fullscreen using footage from the film matrix. It is fairly difficult to tell the difference on a small screen but if you were at a movie theater the difference would be obvious.

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THE BUBBLE - reissue Trailer in HD for 3-D Feature

the Bubble is one othe first 3-D films produced in color, and at this time a regular house hold television could not show a movie in 3-D. This was the beginning of a new revolutionary filming technique.

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Rear Window (1954) Modern Trailer

This is a Focus on America film. It no longer portreys Americans as tough guys from the western but feeble and fragil often middle aged with some sort of vulnerability or disability. This was a way many directors seemed to connect with the audience.

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Avatar - Official Trailer (HD)

The Avatar is a fairly recent movie who uses a a new technology by combining live action with computer animation. When the characters are in the "Navi" form they are in makeup and costumes along with being shot in 3-D animation. When viewing the clip notice how off the scenes look when not show on a proper screen.

 

Avatar released internationally in more than 14,000 screens.Avatar earned $3,537,000 from midnight screenings domestically (United States and Canada), with the initial 3D release limited to 2,200 screens.The film earned $26,752,099 on its opening day, and $77,025,481 over its opening weekend, making it the second largest December opening ever behind I Am Legend, the largest domestic opening weekend for a film not based on a franchise (topping The Incredibles), the highest opening weekend for a film entirely in 3D (breaking Up's record),[160] the highest opening weekend for an environmentalist film (breaking The Day After Tomorrow's record), and the 40th largest opening weekend in North America,despite a blizzard which blanketed the East Coast of the United States and reportedly hurt its opening weekend results. The film also set an IMAX opening weekend record, with 178 theaters generating approximately $9.5 million, 12% of the film's $77 million (at the time) North American gross on less than 3% of the screens.

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Transformers 3 - Optimus vs Sentinel (HD 1080p)

This scene shot in 1080p HD. HD televisions are still reletivally new and not every household has one yet when comparing this to the 3-D there is a drastic difference.

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Spy Kids: All The Time In The World (4D)-Trailer

Another modern day example of Aroma-Rama or Smell-O-Vision called Aroma-Scope.  Viewers are given a scratch and sniff card when purchasing a ticket and are prompted to smell them when given cues throughout the movie.  Not only did this have the scents, but it was also in 3-D, combining two of the "spectacles" designed to get people to the movies.

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This is Cinerama, Trailer

Trailer for classic 3 panel Cinerama movie, This is Cinerama. This trailer shows how widening the screen and adding three cameras for viewing gives the effect that you are in the movie. It allows full use of your vision and peripheral. This effect was not able to be used on a regular boxed television. This prompted people to go back to the movies.

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VistaVision Promotional Film

VistaVision is a higher resolution, widescreen variant of the 35mm motion picture film format which was created by engineers at Paramount Pictures in 1954. This is the promotional film for Paramount's VistaVision. 

As finer-grained film stocks appeared on the market, VistaVision became obsolete. Paramount dropped the format after only seven years, although for another forty years the format was used by some European and Japanese producers for feature films, and by American film studios for high resolution special effects sequences.

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Widescreen Formats in the '50s

 

The first widescreen format, Cinerama, was debuted in 1952 and used 3 separate cameras and 3 projectors.  Unfortunately, though the technology was visually impressive it was common for the projectors to go out of sync, causing unpleasant effects where one third of the screen would be slightly behind the others.  Cinerama ultimately failed due to unreliability and the high expense of building and maintaining these theatres.

 

After the failure of Cinerama, in 1953 20th Century Fox came out with CinemaScope, a single camera/projector system with a special lens capable of projecting at a 2.35:1 aspect ratio similar to those still used in many films today.  This was just the first of many widescreen formats, including Paramount's VistaVision and MGM's Camera 65 and Panavision technologies.

 

The widescreen formats used introduced in the 1950s presented a much larger picture and made possible larger and more epic scenes than could be seen in televisions at the time.

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Cinema History: The 1950s--Focus on American Films

Cinema History: The 1950s--Focus on American Films | Hollywood Spectacles | Scoop.it

Cinemascope and VistaVision were a desperate attempt by studios to lure viewers back to theaters, drive-in movies. Science-fiction filmshad featured aliens who were substitutes for the Communist menace to the East. The gradual dissolution of the famed Studio System that had fueled the economy of Hollywood for the past thirty years. Several directors who made their reputations during the Studio Era in the 1940s (Billy Wilder, John Huston, Elia Kazan, Alfred Hitchcock, and John Ford) continued to make good films (as well as mediocre ones).The last vestiges of the Studio System dissolved in the face of new directors, new approaches to acting, and new ideas about the depiction of the real world in films.

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Disturbia Trailer

This is an example of a modern Focus on America film that is based of the film Rear Window. This film shows the "average" modern teenager who spends three months on house arrest which is his "vulnerability". He witnesses a crime yet can't do anything about it because he is stuck in his house.

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Transformers 3: Dark of the Moon in 3D HD.movie trailer-(b).avi

Transformers 3: Dark of the moon was originally made in 3-D and was reformatted to be seen in 2-D this is how a 3-D movie would show on a 2-D television. 16:10

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Aroma-Rama and Smell-O-Vision

One spectacle that was designed to get viewers into the theaters and away from their TVs was called Aroma-Rama.  This included Charles Weiss' 1959 system of pumping "Oriental" scents into the theatre through the air-conditioning system and was prominently used in Carlo Lizzani's Behind the Great Wall (1959), an Italian documentary about Red China narrated by Chet Huntley. However, this was not the first time scents were used to enhance the movie-going experience. In 1906, rose oil permeated Forest City Pennsylvania's Family Theatre during a Rose Bowl game newsreel. In 1929, lilac oil was spread through the ventilation system of a Boston theater during the opening credits of the love story Lilac Time (1928). And finally in the 1940s, various scents were distributed during the double-bill The Sea Hawk (1940) and Boom Town (1940) in a Detroit theater.

Smell-O-Vision was a similar process that came slightly later in 1960, developed by the Swiss-born Hans Laube, in which 30 different smells were injected into a movie theatre's seats when triggered by various points in the film's soundtrack. Only one film was made with this gimmicky process - Michael Todd Jr.'s' Scent of Mystery (1960) (aka Holiday in Spain). [Two decades later, director John Waters paid homage to this concept with his patented system dubbed Odorama for his B-film melodrama Polyester (1981). It used scratch-and-sniff cards and a number-system on-screen to alert an audience member when to respond.]

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"Rugrats Go Wild" Merchandising & Promotions

"Rugrats Go Wild" Merchandising & Promotions | Hollywood Spectacles | Scoop.it

"Odorama" cards for "Rugrats Go Wild" were available at Burger Kings and Blockbusters. Viewers would pick them up there and bring them to the theater.  The numbers on the card were glow in the dark so they could be seen easily in the theater.  

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