hobbitlibrarianscoops
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hobbitlibrarianscoops
Coordinator of Library Services, American International School Vietnam
Curated by Jenn Alevy
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Scaffold Like an Ant- A simple scaffolding example

Scaffold Like an Ant- A simple scaffolding example | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
I am teaching a class where I allow the students a set amount of time to draw out what they know about a subject. Today, the students did their pre-class work, then came to class, and we began to d...

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 9, 2013 8:20 PM

Check out this infographic which focuses on scaffolding for deeper understanding. Mia MacMeekin has provided a nine step process.

1. Ask a question.

2. Present a mystery for students to solve.

3. Ask students to draw what they know.

4. Give students ample time to research the mystery.

5. Ask students to draw the mystery and the solution again.

6. Ask students to share their drawings with other students.

7. Ask students to pull their ideas together in one drawing.

8. Teacher patiently asks what if questions.

9. If students needs more information, send them back to step #4, and start over again until the outcome or objective is reached.

MacMeekin notes that her students were engaged in the drawing/scaffolding phase of this and reached a deeper understanding than other classes had. It is also important to note that the ant is actually an analogy. To learn more click through to the post.

Xiaoxia Wang's curator insight, November 15, 2013 6:52 PM

How much time teachers would need this kind of problem-solving based scaffolding activity? When to use Thisbe kind of approach? 

Kerrigan Stern's curator insight, February 5, 6:48 PM

Inquiry Session 1

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Innovations in Education - Create a Culture of Questioning and Inquiry

Innovations in Education - Create a Culture of Questioning and Inquiry | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it

"I have often suggested to teachers that when students have access to technology, whether it is provided by the school in a 1:1, BYOD, or simply the smart phone in their pocket, there should never be a question that goes unanswered –or un-followed. These are teachable moments for how to effectively search for information (information literacy & digital literacy) ...What I discovered in the 300+ observations I have done for our 21st Century Learning grant work was that the problem isn’t necessarily about allowing time for students to answer questions. The problem is that they rarely ask questions beyond simply clarifying what needs to be done for the assignment."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 12, 2013 8:43 PM

As teachers we ask our students questions all the time...but how often do your students ask questions...perhaps a better question would be do they know how to ask good questions? This post provides some background material as well as ideas for "how you might begin to shift from a culture of compliance, to a culture of questioning in your classroom." 

One of the ideas she suggests is looking at information from the Right Question Institute and purchasing a book "Make Just One Change: Teach Students To Ask Their Own Questions." I have been reading this book and find it an incredible resource. 

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Why It's Time To Start Teaching Students How To Think - Edudemic

Why It's Time To Start Teaching Students How To Think - Edudemic | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
As an elementary teacher, I can’t help but notice that children today want quick answers and do not take the time to think things through.

Via Beth Dichter
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Carolyn Williams's curator insight, August 26, 2013 4:57 AM

Making it Fun!

Kymberley Pelky's curator insight, August 26, 2013 3:12 PM

In an age where children expect everything to be instant, their responses become the same without taking time to process the information first.

Becky Mowat's comment, August 26, 2013 9:48 PM
Analysis and synthesis take time...and are critical to problem solving, as we all know. How to teach these higher level thinking processes is key to helping students become successful independent learners.
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The Socratic Process - 6 Steps of Questioning (Infographic)

The Socratic Process - 6 Steps of Questioning (Infographic) | hobbitlibrarianscoops | Scoop.it
Hola: Una infografía sobre el proceso socrático. Un saludo

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Audrey's curator insight, August 9, 2013 7:39 AM

Using the Socratic process the educator is a tutor.  The process  encourages evaluative and analytical thinking.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 9, 2013 12:55 PM

This is an easy and yet thorough infographic.

Abel Linares's curator insight, December 3, 2017 9:30 AM
Socratic #Process