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Rethinking Neanderthals

Rethinking Neanderthals | HMSAncientCiv | Scoop.it
Research suggests they fashioned tools, buried their dead, maybe cared for the sick and even conversed. But why, if they were so smart, did they disappear?
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Chinese Homo sapiens fossil shifts perceptions of dispersal

Chinese Homo sapiens fossil shifts perceptions of dispersal | HMSAncientCiv | Scoop.it

The discovery of two teeth in southern China lends weight to the possibility that the exodus of modern humans from Africa may have been earlier than 60,000 years ago

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'Ardi,' Oldest Human Ancestor, Unveiled : DNews

'Ardi,' Oldest Human Ancestor, Unveiled : DNews | HMSAncientCiv | Scoop.it
'Ardi' dates to 4.4. million years and may be the oldest human ancestor ever found.
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Burning rock: Fire setting at the Stone Age Melsvik chert quarries...

Burning rock: Fire setting at the Stone Age Melsvik chert quarries... | HMSAncientCiv | Scoop.it
Fire setting was used at the Melsvik chert quarry in Norway 10.000 years ago, meaning that Stone Age people used their brains in extracting stone and not brute force
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Teeth shed light on migration history of Mesopotamia

Teeth shed light on migration history of Mesopotamia | HMSAncientCiv | Scoop.it
Analysis of non-metric tooth crown traits of the ancient inhabitants of northern Mesopotamia conducted by the Polish team showed that there were no large migrations in this region from the 3rd millennium BC until the Middle Ages.

Via ramblejamble
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Andrew Nayyar's curator insight, January 17, 2014 11:32 PM

From reading the title I initially suspected the article to explain how Northern Mesopotamians migrated. But the data of human tooth crown remains are leading scientist to believe that migration in the northen regoin did not happen until after the thrid milleninium. 

Sheena Dhillon's curator insight, January 23, 2014 11:54 PM

It is said that up until the Middle Ages there were no migration to this area/region. Only upon the Mogolian invasion in the 13th century was there a change in the population. 

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Stone Spear Tips Surprisingly Ancient — "Like Finding an iPod in Ancient Rome"

Stone Spear Tips Surprisingly Ancient — "Like Finding an iPod in Ancient Rome" | HMSAncientCiv | Scoop.it
Weapons dated to 500,000 years ago may be an evolutionary oddity.

Via No Such Thing As The News
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Keith Mielke's curator insight, March 7, 2014 3:06 PM

Finding such an advanced tool in such an ancient time period shows that humans grew faster psychologically than we ever knew before.

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Ancient Mesopotamia

In which John presents Mesopotamia, and the early civilizations that arose around the Fertile Crescent. Topics covered include the birth of territorial kingdoms, empires, Neo-Assyrian torture tactics, sacred marriages, ancient labor practices, the world's first law code, and the great failed romance of John's undergrad years.
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Stone Spear Tips Surprisingly Ancient—"Like Finding an iPod in Ancient Rome"

Stone Spear Tips Surprisingly Ancient—"Like Finding an iPod in Ancient Rome" | HMSAncientCiv | Scoop.it
Weapons dated to 500,000 years ago may be an evolutionary oddity. Said one scientist: "It's like finding an iPod in a Roman Empire site."
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Ow.ly - image uploaded by @JOYOUIntUK

Ow.ly - image uploaded by @JOYOUIntUK | HMSAncientCiv | Scoop.it
JOYOU sharing this cool History of Plumbing Infographic with you - have a great weekend! joyouinternational@gmail.com http://t.co/LPDo5EYSef
Amanda McComas's insight:

Interesting facts about Mesopotamia here. The creator of this poster forgot all about the sophisticated plumbing in ancient Indus Valley civilizations like Mohenjo Daro.

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Cornell to return 10000 ancient tablets to Iraq - Los Angeles Times

Cornell to return 10000 ancient tablets to Iraq - Los Angeles Times | HMSAncientCiv | Scoop.it
Cornell to return 10000 ancient tablets to Iraq
Los Angeles Times
The 10,000 inscribed clay blocks date from the 4th millenium BC and offer scholars an unmatched record of daily life in ancient Mesopotamia, the cradle of civilization.

Via gavin silver
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Sean P Burns's curator insight, January 31, 2014 6:12 PM

10,000 inscribed clay blocks from Cornell University are being returned to Iraq. The return was requested by the Iraqi government in 2012. The clay blocks date back from the 4th millenium and offer a great extent of daily life from the ancient Mesopotamia era.

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Clues to Lost Prehistoric Code Discovered in Mesopotamia - Discovery News

Clues to Lost Prehistoric Code Discovered in Mesopotamia - Discovery News | HMSAncientCiv | Scoop.it
Clues to Lost Prehistoric Code Discovered in Mesopotamia
Discovery News
Archaeologists are using CT scanning and 3D modelling to crack a lost prehistoric code hidden inside clay balls, dating to some 5,500 years ago, found in Mesopotamia.
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Numerical Literacy in Mesopotamia - Archaeology Magazine

Numerical Literacy in Mesopotamia - Archaeology Magazine | HMSAncientCiv | Scoop.it
TORONTO, ONTARIO—CT scans and 3-D modeling were used by Christopher Woods of the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute to examine the interiors of 20 clay balls, known as envelopes, made in Mesopotamia some ...
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Bobby Savoy's curator insight, January 24, 2014 11:05 PM

These orbs are interesting, and serve strange purposes. I don't quite understand how they were used, though. Were they traded? Were they placed as labels for products? It is understandable that they are strange, however, because they predated language in a society that needed better communication.