HMHS History
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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
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Top 20 most inspiring TED videos about maps and geography - Geoawesomeness

Top 20 most inspiring TED videos about maps and geography - Geoawesomeness | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Tweet Share on Facebook Share Share Email Pin Pocket Flipboard TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) is an amazing initiative that organizes events where inspiring people share their inspiring research, work and ideas. For the upcoming holidays we’ve rounded up 20 of the most inspirational and interesting TED talks about maps and geography out there. No matthew if …

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Planet Money's T-Shirt Project

Planet Money's T-Shirt Project | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Planet Money followed the making of a simple cotton t-shirt through the global economy. From Mississippi to Indonesia to Bangladesh to Colombia and back to the U.S. Listen to the stories here.
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Enabling Globalization: The Container

Enabling Globalization: The Container | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The ships, railroads, and trucks that transport containers worldwide form the backbone of the global economy. The pace of globalization over the last sixty years has accelerated due to containers; just like canals and railroads defined earlier phases in the development of a global economy. While distance used to be the largest obstacle to regional integration, these successive waves of transportation improvements have functionally made the world a smaller place. Geographers refer to this as the Space-Time Convergence."


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:19 PM

Containers are part of globalization. It saves time and allows for extra space to store more products. Also, it is easier to handle using ships, railroad, and trucks while also facilitating more quality in terms of safety. However, on the other hand, with the creation of these containers employ mainly the use of technology which, unfortunately, downsizes the workforce. This, as a result, increases the unemployment rate for citizens. Although, when it comes to recycling, the idea of making houses with these containers helps families in diverse ways such as decreased costs, energy efficiency, and very short construction time. Containers have shaped the concept of shipping and living for many years, impacting regions with more business and expansion trades around the world.

Cody Price's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:57 PM

This article describes the basics of globalization and what technology really allowed globalization to spread, the shipping the container. It allowed thing to be shipped organized and more efficiently. These containers fit together perfectly. It helps ideas and products transport all over the world and spread pop culture. 

 

This relates to the idea in unit 3 of globalization. These shipping container allow ideas and products to be shipped all over the world. The shipping container was the key to better connecting the world. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:14 AM

I've posted here several resources about the global economy and the crucial role that containers play in enabling globalization.  In this article for National Geographic Education, I draw on many of these to to put it all in one nice container.  


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Growth of underwater cables that power the web

Growth of underwater cables that power the web | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The map above, created with data from Telegeography, shows how those cables have developed since 1990. Most existing cables were constructed during a period of rapid growth in the mid-2000’s. This was followed by a gap of several years during which companies steadily exhausted the available capacity. Over the last few years, explosive new demand, driven by streaming video, has once again jumpstarted the the construction of new cables."


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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Interconnections
ROCAFORT's curator insight, October 28, 2016 2:48 AM
Growth of underwater cables that power the web
Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 5:42 PM

Telecommunication linkages between continents, regions and cities. Note the strength of the trans-atlantic connections. These communication linkages enable communication between these areas.

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Are container ships getting too big?

Are container ships getting too big? | HMHS History | Scoop.it

What is blue, a quarter of a mile long, and taller than London's Olympic stadium?  The answer - this year's new class of container ship, the Triple E. When it goes into service this June, it will be the largest vessel ploughing the sea.  Each will contain as much steel as eight Eiffel Towers and have a capacity equivalent to 18,000 20-foot containers (TEU).  


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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:17 PM

These vessels are specifically made to increase more profit and is a symbol of economic power for trades between Europe and Asia. They aim to increase containment of cargo so it is more efficient and time consuming of going back to fourth. However, they forced ports to become bigger to compete and keep up with these new inventions. These ships are getting too big and are only able to transit through the Suez canal and cannot go through the Panama. This lead to the Chinese expanding their reach to Nicaragua and building a larger canal to be able to pass through Central America.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:42 PM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.    

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:18 AM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways

Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"It is estimated that 97 per cent of all trade – the things we buy in shops – will have been transported in containers by ships at sea. The container vessel, stacked high with uniformly-sized metal boxes, has become a symbol of our globalized world. This is a world of imports and exports, a world where moving things across huge distances keeps the price of daily commodities low as items are manufactured in one place, then packaged in another, before arriving on the shores where they will eventually be sold. In recent geographical literature, attention has turned to the world at sea – a space traditionally overlooked. Geography means ‘Earth-writing’ and geographers have taken the origins of the term very seriously. They have written primarily about the Earth: the ground, the soil, the land. The sea is something ‘out there’ – seemingly disconnected from our everyday lives. However, an appreciation of the world as made from flows and connections has enabled geography to recognize that the sea is essential to our landed life." http://wp.me/p2Ij6x-5DS

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 19, 3:38 PM
Geographic Concepts: Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective, Interrelationships
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Population, Sustainability, and Malthus

In which John Green teaches you about population. So, how many people can reasonably live on the Earth? Thomas Malthus got it totally wrong in the 19th century, but for some reason, he keeps coming up when we talk about population. In 1800, the human population of the Earth passed 1 billion, and Thomas Malthus posited that growth had hit its ceiling, and the population would level off and stop growing. He was totally right. Just kidding, he was totally wrong! There are like 7 billion people on the planet now! John will teach a little about how Malthus made his calculations, and explain how Malthus came up with the wrong answer. As is often the case, it has to do with making projections based on faulty assumptions. Man, people do that a lot.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 4:15 PM

This is a succinct summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHGunit 2 population

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APHG Promo Video

This is video is a great tool to drum up interest in an AP Human Geography course produced by David Burton.  See more promotional videos/start-of-the-year clips at http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1ec


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 3:33 PM

This is just one of my favorite "start of the year" videos.  I've compiled them for when you need to show the importance of geography, spatial thinking and geo-literacy.  Collectively, they show why taking geography courses is so important, useful and interesting. 

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education, APHG.

Sally Egan's curator insight, February 15, 4:11 PM
Love this video introducing the study of Geography. Its dramatic and diverse in the issues it introduces.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, May 31, 10:37 AM
Believe the hype
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Bill Gates and John Green Discuss Agriculture

Special bonus video! If we raise $100,000 to get clean water to people in Ethiopia, BILL GATES WILL MATCH IT WITH ANOTHER $100,000
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Feeding Nine Billion Video 4: The Need for More Equitable Food Distribution by Evan Fraser

Brought to you by http://www.feedingninebillion.com By 2050 there will be 9 billion people on the planet - but will there be enough food for everyone? Foo
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WORKSHEETS: Climate Migrants

WORKSHEETS: Climate Migrants | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The ESRI storymap on climate refugees does a phenomenal job sampling locations in the world that experience migration effects as a result of climate change. Attached is a guided worksheet that accompanies the ESRI Climate Migrant Storymap."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 10:04 AM

This StoryMap shows some key regions where migrants are fleeing some of the negative impacts of climate change and one APHG teacher has created a fabulous worksheet to guide students through this great resource.   

 

TagsAPHG, climate changemigrationrefugees, environment, coastalmappingESRIStoryMap, political ecology.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, January 26, 2:51 PM
Geographic Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships, Geographic Perspective
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Philly port is poised to get new cranes, bigger ships, more cargo, and more jobs

Philly port is poised to get new cranes, bigger ships, more cargo, and more jobs | HMHS History | Scoop.it
More cars, more containerized freight, and more cargo such as wood pulp and lumber will all be arriving on larger ships and creating more jobs. - Linda Loyd, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News
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Reefer Madness

Reefer Madness | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"There are around 6,000 cargo vessels out on the ocean right now, carrying 20,000,000 shipping containers, which are delivering most of the products you see around you. And among all the containers are a special subset of temperature-controlled units known in the global cargo industry, in all seriousness, as reefers.

70% of what we eat passes through the global cold chain, a series of artificially-cooled spaces, which is where the reefer comes into play."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2015 3:05 PM

I have written in the past about how containerization has remade the world we live in, but not much about the role of the refrigerated container (reefer).  So many economic geographies and agricultural geographies in the our consumer-based society hinge of this technological innovation.  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content.  


Tags: transportationfood distributiontechnology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, podcast.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:19 PM

An interesting addition to any study of global trade connections 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:06 AM

I have written in the past about how containerization has remade the world we live in, but not much about the role of the refrigerated container (reefer).  So many economic geographies and agricultural geographies in the our consumer-based society hinge of this technological innovation.  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content.  


Tags: transportation, food distribution, technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, podcast.

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Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


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Mediterranean Cruise Advice's curator insight, February 25, 2015 6:46 AM

This is amazing to watch.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 2015 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:24 PM

An important aspect of global trade links and connections. 

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These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:31 PM
The times, they are a-changin'
Alisha Meyer's curator insight, March 24, 2016 9:04 AM
Our world is changing, that is inevitable.  It's how we decide to use the technology and knowledge we now have to better ourselves or destroy ourselves.
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This is where your smartphone battery begins

This is where your smartphone battery begins | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Workers, including children, labor in harsh and dangerous conditions to meet the world’s soaring demand for cobalt, a mineral essential to powering electric vehicles, laptops, and smartphones, according to an investigation by The Washington Post.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 2, 2016 6:47 PM

Links between the products we use and other people, places and environments - and the consequences of production. 

Gayle Kakac's curator insight, October 3, 2016 10:31 AM
I'm afraid this is a very sad aspect of our technology.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, October 4, 2016 2:29 AM
This is where your smartphone battery begins
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Shrinking cities: the rise and fall of global urban populations – mapped

Shrinking cities: the rise and fall of global urban populations – mapped | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The world is experiencing rapid urbanisation, but not every city is growing. Population is likely to decline in 17% of large cities in developed regions and 8% of cities across the world from 2015 to 2025, according to a McKinsey report."


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HumdeBut's curator insight, March 2, 6:17 AM
ça craint, non ?
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 9, 11:59 AM
unit 7
James Hardie's curator insight, April 17, 9:12 PM

Geographical skills and concepts: place / space / scale / change 

Geographical knowledge: "Causes and consequences of urbanisation, drawing on a study from Indonesia, or another country of the Asia region (ACHGK054)" 

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Why China is building islands in the South China Sea

"China is building islands in the South China sea and its causing disputes among the other nations in the region; Malaysia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, and Indonesia. China claims they aren't military bases, but their actions say otherwise. The US has many allies in the region and uses its massive Navy to patrol international waters, keeping shipping lanes open for trade."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 4, 4:10 PM

Last year this was an intriguing story but now the geopolitical drama is growing as more countries are literally building islands out of reef outcroppings to strengthen their claims to the South China Sea.  For some without geographic expertise, this might some baffling.  For those that understand Exclusive Economic Zones, maritime claims, and expanding geopolitical aspirations, this makes perfect sense. 

 

Tags: borders, political, conflict, waterChina, East Asia.

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Rostow Model

The Rostow Model

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 14, 2016 1:14 PM

The Rostow Model is an important and influential way of thinking about industry and economic geography (and a part of the AP and IB geography curricula).  This slideshare for gives a solid overview of the 5 stages of the model and also provides examples and critiques of the model. 

 

Tags: industry, development, economic, APHG, unit 6 industry.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 26, 1:37 PM
unit 6
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Urban Farmers Say It's Time They Got Their Own Research Farms

Urban Farmers Say It's Time They Got Their Own Research Farms | HMHS History | Scoop.it
The University of the District of Columbia is the one land-grant university in the U.S. with an urban focus. It's leading research on growing food in raised beds, hoop houses and shipping containers.


Tags: agriculture, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture. 


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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 2:28 PM

Almost 80 percent of Americans live in urban areas and that means many people are wanting to grow their own food in the busy city life. To learn how to properly do this, these people turn to land-grant colleges and universities to give then helpful advice. Many colleges do help with urban and rural ares, but there is only one one in the entire country that is devoted singularly to urban farming; The University of the District of Columbia.

This is a great example of the distribution of agricultural and a great way to educate people on the proper way to cultivate and harvest your own food in small, limited spaces. It also proves that we really can prosper everywhere with the right tools and knowledge about urban farming.

Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:30 PM

Summary: This article goes into extensive detail about urban agriculture and new technologies and techniques that must be brought to urban agriculture.

 

Insight: This article relates to unit 5 because it talks about a new and modern form of agriculture that could become very important when considering the portion of the population living in urban and suburban areas. 

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:20 PM

This could help develop sustainable communities and promote organic growth throughout the country. Which could potentially improve the standard of living

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Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways

Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"It is estimated that 97 per cent of all trade – the things we buy in shops – will have been transported in containers by ships at sea. The container vessel, stacked high with uniformly-sized metal boxes, has become a symbol of our globalized world. This is a world of imports and exports, a world where moving things across huge distances keeps the price of daily commodities low as items are manufactured in one place, then packaged in another, before arriving on the shores where they will eventually be sold. In recent geographical literature, attention has turned to the world at sea – a space traditionally overlooked. Geography means ‘Earth-writing’ and geographers have taken the origins of the term very seriously. They have written primarily about the Earth: the ground, the soil, the land. The sea is something ‘out there’ – seemingly disconnected from our everyday lives. However, an appreciation of the world as made from flows and connections has enabled geography to recognize that the sea is essential to our landed life." http://wp.me/p2Ij6x-5DS

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 19, 3:38 PM
Geographic Concepts: Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective, Interrelationships
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What is Organic

Want to know what organic really means? Learn the difference between conventional and organic farming plus what certifier's logos to look out for regardles
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Chipotle - Back to the Start

Coldplay's haunting classic 'The Scientist' is performed by country music legend Willie Nelson for the soundtrack of the short film entitled, "Back to th
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