HMHS History
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HMHS History
"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
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Using 'Geography Education'

Using 'Geography Education' | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"This story map was created with ArcGIS Online to guide users on how to get the most out of the Geography Education websites on Wordpress and Scoop.it."


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ROCAFORT's curator insight, September 23, 2016 2:47 AM
Using 'Geography Education'
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, December 3, 2016 9:33 PM
Just getting familiar with ArcGis and lots of ideas picked up at #ncss16
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Rostow Model

The Rostow Model

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 14, 2016 1:14 PM

The Rostow Model is an important and influential way of thinking about industry and economic geography (and a part of the AP and IB geography curricula).  This slideshare for gives a solid overview of the 5 stages of the model and also provides examples and critiques of the model. 

 

Tags: industry, development, economic, APHG, unit 6 industry.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 26, 2017 1:37 PM
unit 6
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How China Plans to Feed 1.4 Billion Growing Appetites

How China Plans to Feed 1.4 Billion Growing Appetites | HMHS History | Scoop.it
As more Chinese crave Western-style diets, the booming nation rushes to industrialize an agricultural economy long built around small farms.
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How Does the U.S. Census Bureau Define Rural?

"The U.S. Census Bureau has designed a multimedia application experience, a story map, called 'Rural America: How Does the U.S. Census Bureau Define Rural?' This story map contains interactive web maps, tables, information, and images to help explain how the Census Bureau defines 'rural.' Many rural communities rely on American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimates, rather than ACS 1-year estimates, because of population thresholds. This story map helps data users understand the history and definition of 'rural.' Watch this video and then visit the story map to learn more." Visit the Story Map: http://go.usa.gov/x8yPZ  


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 17, 2017 11:19 AM

Census geography brings statistical data to life as seen in their newly designed interactive story map, called "Rural America: How Does the U.S. Census Bureau Define 'Rural?" Not only does this story map helps explain how the Census Bureau defines rural, but it displays some fantastic data that helps students to explore rural America.  Many APHG teachers refer to unit 5 as the "ag unit" but the full title, Agriculture, food production, and rural land use, certainly does highlight why this can be a valuable resource.  

 

Tags: rural, census, regions, mappingESRIStoryMap.

Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 10:57 PM
The U.S. Census Bureau defines "rural" as an area with less than 50,000 people living in it. The majority of the United States is actually considered rural while a small minority of the country is labeled as urban. But interestingly enough, most rural areas are clustered around urban areas rather than in random locations. It seems as though the further out one ventures out from the center of an urban area like a major city, the more the population begins to decrease. One can also see in the same situation, the area transition from urban to rural. U.S. Census data can tell us a lot about populations in rural and urban areas and the correlation between them which can be important to know for many reasons.
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How a Steel Box Changed the World: A Brief History of Shipping

"As the container shipping industry continues to boom, companies are adopting new technologies to move cargo faster and shifting to crewless ships. But it’s not all been smooth sailing and the future will see fewer players stay above water."


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Matt Manish's curator insight, March 1, 7:50 PM
I found this video to be quite informative about the process of shipping goods throughout the world. I didn't know that 95% of world wide goods are shipped in container vessels. I also never really put much thought into how goods were shipped before watching this video. One piece of information that stuck out to me was that not too long ago ships would spend more time loading cargo at ports than they would actually traveling. That was until the idea of using containers to ship goods on top of shipping vessels was developed. It seems like such a simple idea, but is truly one that has changed the shipping industry forever. This container system saves time, energy, money, and is indeed the most effective way to ship goods throughout the world.
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 2, 7:38 AM
Unit 6 
Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 4:07 PM
Unit 6
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Mark Bittman: What's wrong with what we eat | TED Talk

In this fiery and funny talk, New York Times food writer Mark Bittman weighs in on what's wrong with the way we eat now (too much meat, too few plants; too much fast food, too little home cooking), and why it's putting the entire planet at risk.
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Brexit, UK, Great Britain, and England

"An update of an earlier sketch we did before Brexit, the situation has become a little more unclear since."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 15, 2017 8:56 PM

The difference between the UK, Great Britain, and England can be confusing (the short version can be shown on a map, but the long version is much more complicated than this).   This is an amusing look at how these complexities lead to real-world complications besides using the right toponym. 

 

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, February 15, 7:14 PM
This video quickly defines the different terminologies that can be used to define England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, and Ireland. The different terms include England, for England, Great Britain, when talking about England, Scotland and Wales, and the United Kingdom when talking about England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The video also talks about  how in different sporting events this group of countries competes differently, sometimes they are Great Britain, sometimes the United Kingdom, sometimes the countries compete individually sometimes Northern Ireland competes with Ireland. This video described all these differences very well. 
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Donut Holes in Law of the Sea

Donut Holes in Law of the Sea | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Sovereignty over land defines nation states since 1648. In contrast, sovereign right over the sea was formalised only in 1982. While land borders are well-known, sea borders escape the limelight."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 8, 2014 9:28 PM

These maritime borders mark the economic area is defined by its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a 200-nautical mile-wide (370 km) strip of sea along the country’s national coast line.  This regulation, which was installed by the ‘UN Convention on the Law of the Sea’ in 1982, grants a state special rights to exploit natural (such as oil) and marine (for instance fish) resources, including scientific research and energy production (wind-parks, for example).  This interactive map of the EEZs also shows the 'donut holes,' or the seas that are no state can claim that no state can claim.  Given the number of conflicts that are occurring--especially in East Asia--this map becomes a very valuable online resource for teaching political geography. 


Questions to ponder: how does this series of buffer zones around the Earth's land masses impact politics, the environment and local economies?  Where might the EEZs be more important to the success of a country/territory than other regions? 


Tagseconomic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, states, conflict, unit 4 political.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 29, 2014 5:48 PM

Option topic Marine  Environments and management

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM

APHG-U4

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Nonviolence and Peace Movements: Crash Course World History 228

In which John Green teaches you about nonviolence and peace movements in the 20th century. What is nonviolence? What is a peace movement? Well
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How the Division of Knowledge Saved My Son's Life

In this video, Professor Boudreaux explains how the specialization of knowledge helped his two-year old son overcome a life-threatening illness. The scienc
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A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet

A map of all the underwater cables that connect the internet | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Do you know how the internet gets across the ocean? This amazing map shows every cable that makes it possible.

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Olivier Tabary's curator insight, March 25, 2015 4:28 PM

And no, not everything has turned virtual! We still rely on concrete stuff. Cables network says a lot about the way our World works. 

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:07 PM

This article deals with unit 1 because it has to do with maps. This map shows how underwater cables connect the internet throughout the world. The cables transmit 99% of international data instantly. On this map you can also see latency. Another map in this article shows 1912 trade routes and underwater cables today. The routes are similar and the interdependency has stayed but the methods and meanings for each of these things are different. To pass the ocean is risky by the investments, and trading. Sailors took tHess risks and now the tech companies are taking them. The cables are thin in the deep water equalling 3 inches across. In addition the cables are thicker in shallower water. The interesting thing is these cables can go as deep as Mount Everest is high. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:12 AM

Because globalization.  


Tags: Time-Space Compression, development, technology, economic, globalization, industry, unit 6 industry.

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How Dollar General Is Transforming Rural America

How Dollar General Is Transforming Rural America | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Dollar General stores thrive in low-income rural towns, and the deep-discount chain has opened hundreds of new shops in the past year."

 

Dollar General is set to open 1,000 locations this year, for a total of more than 14,000 stores. It will have more stores than McDonald's has restaurants in the entire country. That includes plenty of urban locations, but the chain's bright yellow and black signs pop up about every 10 miles along many remote state highways. Like Walmart, it has rural roots. Dollar General started in small-town Kentucky. Al Cross, who runs the Institute for Rural Journalism at the University of Kentucky, says Dollar General competes with the world's largest retailer on price and convenience.

 

Tags: rural, retail, podcast.


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Matt Manish's curator insight, March 15, 7:49 PM
I found this article to be very relevant since the first Dollar General store I've ever seen just popped up within the last year in Rhode Island. Apparently Dollar General is such a big chain in the rest of the country, that it has more stores than Walmart does. According to this article, there are certain advantages and disadvantages of Dollar General building stores in the rural parts of the country. For example this article talks about how people in some rural areas have towns that are so small they don't have any local grocers. So when a Dollar General is built in a town like that, it is a huge benefit to the town. In other cases with small towns that already have a local grocery store, Dollar General can put that store out of business with the difference in their prices. Ultimately, whether or not Dollar General's expansion into rural areas of the U.S. can be seen as negative or positive depends on the local business structure in those small towns.
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 16, 4:02 PM
Development
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GeoSettr

GeoSettr | HMHS History | Scoop.it

In May 2013, GeoGuessr came online and quickly became a favorite quiz game of geo-enthusiasts.  Using 5 random locations in Google Street View.  The game player can search the area in Street View and then make a guess as to where it is on the map.  Using GeoSettr, you can create your own GeoGuessr challenge by choosing five locations on Google Street View.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 30, 9:23 AM

You can customize your own GeoGuessr quizzes now, as others pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape you selected and find more context clues as to where that location is.  Try my sample quiz that I made based on these 5 clues.   

  1. The best place to get clam cakes and doughboys in RI
  2. My hometown is home to this center of athletic excellence
  3. This monument was a part of my research in this Latin American city
  4. This is where I went to school to get my Ph.D.
  5. Home to the movie “Close Encounters,” this National Monument has always fascinated me.  

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 27, 6:34 AM

another great tool - create your own Geoguesser games

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The Age of Borders

The Age of Borders | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"The creation date of (almost) every international border.  Full-size image here."

 

Tags: infographic, worldwide, borders, political, historical.


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, February 23, 10:04 PM
Political Unit: History of  borders
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 27, 6:33 AM

Preliminary - Political Geography 

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Log Cabin TIMELAPSE Built By ONE MAN In The Forest (Real Life Minecraft) - YouTube

Shawn James Canadian outdoorsman, photographer, guide and self-reliance educator. Writer for Ontario Tourism, blogging at myselfreliance.com Outdoo
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Welcome to the land that no country wants

Welcome to the land that no country wants | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Bir Tawil is the last truly unclaimed land on earth: a tiny sliver of Africa ruled by no state, inhabited by no permanent residents and governed by no laws.

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bridget rosolanka's curator insight, March 23, 2016 8:28 AM

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

Tracy Ross's curator insight, March 23, 2016 10:50 AM

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 2016 12:57 PM

Both Sudan and Egypt claim the rightful border between their countries should include the Hala'ib Triangle on their side of the border.  This leaves Bir Tawil unclaimed and it pops up in the news when those hoping to create a micronation claim it.  This bizarre case exemplifies some important principles of political geography with a tangible example to test the limits of political sovereignty and what it take to be called a country.  If discussing the elements necessary to create a state, this article would help fuel a discussion, especially when some people are eager to create their own micronation.    

 

Tags: political, states, unit 4 political.

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NATIONAL POPULATION PYRAMIDS

NATIONAL POPULATION PYRAMIDS | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Dynamic United States Population Pyramid explores 100 years of age and sex distribution and world comparisons.
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The danger of a single story

The danger of a single story | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice -- and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.
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Mini Bio: Gandhi

Mahatma Gandhi was an international symbol for human rights whose personal dedication to nonviolent resistance inspired generations. Find out more about hi
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Why do people and nations trade?

"Mark Blyth of Brown University explains international trade." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 5, 2017 7:17 PM

To understand international trade, you need to understand how the factors of production vary from place to place, resulting in different locations having a comparative advantage on a global market.  This video nicely explains that with the example of Scotland’s comparative advantage raising sheep with southern Europe’s comparative advantage in producing wine.   Does the size of a country matter in trade?  You betcha.

 

Tags: regions, economic, diffusion, industry