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"Where liberty is, there is my country." - Benjamin Franklin
Curated by Michael Miller
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Portraits Of NYC Immigrants Reveal Cultural Backgrounds

Portraits Of NYC Immigrants Reveal Cultural Backgrounds | HMHS History | Scoop.it
Here are just a handful of the 12 million men, women, and children who arrived at Ellis Island, New York, between 1892 and 1954 to start a new life in the USA, often dressed in their finest clothes. The portraits show immigrants wearing the national dress of their country of origin, including military uniforms from Albania, bonnets from the Netherlands, and clothing of Sámi people from the Arctic regions.

The photographs were taken between 1906 and 1914 by amateur photographer Augustus Francis Sherman, the chief registry clerk at Ellis Island, then the country’s busiest immigration station. In 1907 some of the photos were published by National Geographic.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 2, 2016 11:26 AM

These images show some of the diverse cultural backgrounds of turn-of-the-century American immigrants.  The formal clothing that represents the folk cultures that they came from hint at the massive cultural shift that these immigrants must have experienced upon arriving to the United States.  These photos of migrants wearing clothing representing their Old World lives right as they are about to culturally assimilate (or acculturate) into the New World are pictures I find quite poignant and personal.    

 

Tagsculturemigrationhistorical, folk culturesethnicity, unit 3 culture.

16s3d's curator insight, October 21, 2016 2:06 AM
Les couleurs révélées de la diversité des immigrants aux États-Unis entre 1906 et 1914
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Hispanic Population in the USA

Hispanic Population in the USA | HMHS History | Scoop.it
This data visualization from the U.S. Census Bureau shows distribution of Hispanic or Latino population by specific origin. http://go.usa.gov/D7VH

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Miguel Alfaro's curator insight, October 9, 2014 8:51 PM

Informacion de Latinos en los Estados Unidos.

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 21, 2014 6:48 PM

Very interesting to see how both major countries like Mexico Puerto Rico differ throughout the United States. I'm actually not surprised of the static itself since it would make sense where they would go once in the United States. As Mexico being the closest to the United States its obvious how they would just go to California then scatter through the rest of the United States. As for Puerto Rican's I really didn't know where the majority of them would be in the United States. But very cool to see!

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:50 PM

Density, distribution, and scale - Density of a country or place, and distribution of where these clusters occur, has to do with migration, cities, and available work. For Mexican's in the United States, distribution is mostly along the border, coasts, or low paid work opportunities. 

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Facts for Features: Irish-American Heritage Month (March) and St. Patrick's Day

Facts for Features: Irish-American Heritage Month (March) and St. Patrick's Day | HMHS History | Scoop.it

"Originally a religious holiday to honor St. Patrick, who introduced Christianity to Ireland in the fifth century, St. Patrick's Day has evolved into a celebration for all things Irish. The world's first St. Patrick's Day parade occurred on March 17, 1762, in New York City, featuring Irish soldiers serving in the English military. This parade became an annual event, with President Truman attending in 1948. Congress proclaimed March as Irish-American Heritage Month in 1995, and the President issues a proclamation commemorating the occasion each year."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 17, 2014 10:30 AM

We celebrate St Patrick's Day to commemorate him for driving out the snakes from Ireland in the 5th century (or to just have an excuse to party, kiss and pinch people).  What does the biogeography of Ireland have to tell us about this legend?  Some believe that the non-believers (figurative 'snakes') were what he drove out of the Emerald Isle, a land with a rich culture.     

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The Endangered Languages Project

The Endangered Languages Project is a website for people to find and share the most up-to-date and comprehensive information about the over 3,000 endangered ...

 

This short video is a great primer for understanding the importance of linguistic diversity.  Why the loss of linguistic diversity (a global phenomenon) related to other themes  on geography, such as political and economic autonomy for minority groups?  Why are so many languages vanishing today?  What forces are creating these emerging cultural patterns?  For more on the project, see: http://www.endangeredlanguages.com/


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Matt Nardone's comment, September 2, 2012 3:52 PM
I learned a lot from this video/article. I can not believe out of 7000 languages today only about half will survive by the new century. I never thought of language loss as a result of injustice and oppression of a culture. I think that it is very interesting that to save a language means to restore a cultures ideals, ideology, and norms. I think that it is pretty cool Google is trying to help perserve some of the languages that may be fading. It is neat to think that one of the largest social media/communication companies has a great interest not in a universal language BUT a great interest in maintaining differences and uniquenesses about languages.
Adrian Francisco's comment, September 3, 2012 11:04 AM
I like this project and how it preserves languages that are about to die. It's not good when a language dies because there might be some information written in the language and in the future when we look at books we would not know what it is saying.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 11:59 AM

This is a great website in which everyone should look at because it shows how everyone can come together and help preserve all these languages we all hear today. Day by day languages are becoming extinct because they are speaking English one of the most spoken languages in the world and everyone speaks it or speaks little of it that people can understand. More languages are becoming extinct day by day.