Health and Technology
502 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Social Media and Healthcare
onto Health and Technology
Scoop.it!

Survey: 31 percent of MDs use mobile to communicate with patients

Survey: 31 percent of MDs use mobile to communicate with patients | Health and Technology | Scoop.it

Half of physicians and extenders said virtual visits could replace more than 10 percent of in-office patient visits, thus giving them more time during the workday, according to a PricewaterhouseCoopers survey of 1,000 physicians, nurse practitioners, and PAs.

Still, only 15 percent of clinicians said they currently offer telehealth services to patients with chronic conditions and just 28 percent said they are considering adding these services. Seventy nine percent of physicians found that mobile devices could help them coordinate care more effectively. Around 42 percent of physicians said they feel comfortable relying on a patient’s at-home test results to prescribe medication, the survey found.

 

“Digitally-enabled care is no longer nice-to-have, it’s fundamental for delivering high quality care,” Daniel Garrett, health information technology practice leader for PwC US said in a statement. “Just as the banking and retail sectors today use data and technology to improve efficiency, raise quality, and expand services, healthcare must either do the same or lose patients to their competitors who do so.”

When PwC compared surveys from 2014 and 2010, the research firm found that while in 2010 12 percent of physicians said they accessed medical records on a mobile device, 45 percent do so now. Additionally, in 2010, 14 percent of physicians prescribed medications on a mobile device, while 41 percent do now. The number of physicians who use a mobile device to communicate with patients grew ten percent from 21 percent in 2010 to 31 percent in 2014.

Barriers for physician adoption of mobile technologies include concerns about privacy and security of patient health data, lack of reimbursement for using digital health devices, connectivity issues, and that digital health technologies are too expensive to adopt.

“The adoption and integration of digital technology with existing healthcare processes has not yet fulfilled its potential to transform care and value for patients,” Simon Samaha, a principal at PwC said in a statement. “The next five years will be critical, with leaders emerging from those who use digital technology to innovate and revamp the interactions between consumers, providers and payers.”


Via Celine Sportisse, Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Trending in Uganda
Scoop.it!

Vendors lose millions in leaking new Jinja market

Vendors lose millions in leaking new Jinja market | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
Faults. The market which was recently discovered to have cracks in the walls, now has a leaking roof

Via Ugtrendz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

How social media activity can improve search rankings

How social media activity can improve search rankings | Health and Technology | Scoop.it

Being active on social media is pretty much a given for brands and organisations nowadays. The vast majority of consumers are active on the social media sites, and it is on those sites that opinions about brands are formed and discussed. Having a ‘voice’ or a spokesperson who engages with potential and existing customers and encourages positive interaction is necessary to improve overall perception. But the right kind of social activity can also boost search rankings, both indirectly and directly.

There are several ways to boost a brand’s rankings via social media activity.

The search engines are in the business of providing relevant search results to their users, and part of the search engine algorithm looks for indicators of popularity and credibility. When a link to a specific piece of content or web page has been shared and clicked on many times, the search engines recognise the volume of clicks as an indicator of credibility and interest, and therefore allocate a higher ranking to that content. One way to get a high volume of clicks on a link back to your site is to share it through social media, and if it is deemed of interest to your target market, and seen as credible, it will be shared and linked to. The more that content is shared, the more chances there are of it being clicked and linked to. Social sharing increases the visibility of a link, and therefore the likelihood of gaining more clicks.

The search engines also rank content on the basis of quality, and a sign of quality content is often judged by the length of time a user might spend reading that content (hence the importance of monitoring visit duration on a website). Another indicator of quality is interaction – on social media sites, this translates into retweets; plus ones (+1’s); likes and comments. These social signals give a positive indication of quality, and hence that content would be deemed of interest to searchers and be ranked higher than other similar content in search results. Encouraging social interaction is therefore an important part of any social media marketing strategy.

You may have noticed Google plus (G+) posts featuring in search results for phrases which are used in the titles of those posts. The reasons for this are twofold: (1) that G+ content is prioritised in search results, and (2) the majority of G+ users are often signed in to google when searching. If those users then search for phrases which match those in a connection’s G+ post, that post will feature in the results shown to those users. In the same way, +1’s from connections will also be shown in relevant search results – Google sees the +1’s as a recommendation of good quality content, and therefore prioritises that content in the search results for connected users.

Key takeaways:

Make brand content easily shareableShare links on social mediaEncourage interaction with your contentMeasure engagement to see what resonates with your target marketBuild and maintain a presence on G+

- See more at: http://www.eurocomhealthcare.com/how-social-media-activity-can-improve-search-rankings/#sthash.IXCmbuGG.dpuf

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Patients turn to social media to find specialty medical care

Patients turn to social media to find specialty medical care | Health and Technology | Scoop.it

 It’s a story that has been told many times in these pages: A patient is told that they are afflicted by an inoperable brain lesion, only to find hope and—often—a cure by traveling to Barrow Neurological Institute.

The story of Tony Thompson, a 29-year-old artist from upstate New York is no different in that regard.

However, how he found his way here highlights an emerging trend across medicine—people using social media communities in their effort to find specialty medical care.

Bleed after bleed

Thompson first experienced the symptoms of what would eventually be diagnosed as a cavernous angioma—a benign tumor composed of dilated capillaries—in September of 2011. The tumor was located in his brainstem, and when it began to bleed into the surrounding tissue, his symptoms quickly worsened.

“I was just shocked that these symptoms progressed to something like this, to the point where I couldn’t even stand up, and to find out that there was actually blood in my brainstem,” says Thompson. “I am very healthy and active, so to have this random thing making me lose control of my body was terrifying.”

He would eventually spend 57 days in the hospital recovering from the initial bleed. During that time, his search for answers began.

Wanted: A second opinion

While Thompson was in rehabilitation, friends of his family were hard at work finding neurosurgeons specializing in the treatment of lesions of the brain stem. They soon realized that they would be dealing with a very short list, and that Robert Spetzler, MD, of Barrow was at the top.

However, as Thompson relates, his research into the work of Dr. Spetzler had a distinctly social flavor.

“My research was mainly through Facebook. I was able to get in touch with people—some who had already been treated at Barrow by Dr. Spetzler and his team—who had great stories of recovery. Some of them couldn’t find anybody willing to perform their surgery for years before they found Dr. Spetzler.”

After his cavernous angioma bled for a third time, Thompson decided to travel to Barrow and join their ranks. He is now back at home, continuing rehabilitation and hoping for the best.

"I still have a long way to go, but my symptoms have slowly gotten better after surgery," Thompson said. 

Ahead of the digital curve

Thompson’s story and others like it have gotten the attention of leadership at Barrow. As a result, plans are in place to totally redesign the Barrow website in 2015. A significant investment is also being made on improvements to Barrow’s online second opinion program.

“We’re really seeing it emerge as a huge trend in healthcare. People want more information about their diseases and their doctors, and they want it all at their fingertips,” says Barrow Director of Informatics Judd Shaft.

For his part, Thompson is a big believer in the power of the web and social media to help people find the care they need.

“It kind of shocked me how many people in these online support groups had been told that their conditions were inoperable,” he says. “Many of those same people end up getting treated by Dr. Spetzler at Barrow. He is easily the most-referenced surgeon in those groups.”

He also noted that for many in the groups, their participation doesn’t end with recovery.

“We keep checking up with each other to this day,” he says. “We’ve made new friends—we call each other brain buddies.”

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

FDA Approval Process Could Benefit from Big Data, Social Media

FDA Approval Process Could Benefit from Big Data, Social Media | Health and Technology | Scoop.it

Data aggregated from electronic health record (EHRs), social media platforms, and other sources could hasten the medical device development process and help regulators monitor safety, according to an assembly of bipartisan experts.

Earlier this week, speakers at the Bipartisan Policy Center’s “FDA: Advancing Medical Innovation” initiative lamented the lag time during the medical device discovery process, a process that hasn’t been updated since 1997, according to former United States Senator Bill Frist. This has led product developers to take development overseas where patients can be treated faster and with less red tape.

According to a Healthcare IT News report on the conference, speakers advocated for a Big Data approach to gathering data on medical devices and agreed to encourage Congress to take another look at the FDA’s approval practices.

Device makers “should be able to engage in sophisticated methods [or data collection and analysis] to understand patient preferences. But we’re not taking these well-established methods and plugging them into drug and device development,” noted Marc Boutin, CEO of the National Health Council. He also added that this approach to data has served electoral politics and consumer marketing well.

Patients with medical devices now have the ability to update physicians and researchers in real time by reporting feedback straight into their EHRs via patient portals. They are also likely to discuss their successes and problems with a device on social media platforms and other disease-specific web forums.

“Our inefficient, less-than-modern, drug discovery and device approval process drives up cost and delays treatment,” said Frist. “We must accelerate the process of getting safe and effective drug and medical devices to patients.”

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
Scoop.it!

Exercise, Not Diet, Has Most Impact On Weight As We Age

Exercise, Not Diet, Has Most Impact On Weight As We Age | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
It won't shock anyone to know that Americans tend to gain weight as they get older. But it is a little surprising that as Americans age and put on more body fat, the quality of their diets generally improves.

In other words, Americans do try to co...

Via Peter Mellow
more...
Donovan Baldwin's curator insight, April 3, 2015 10:18 AM

While exercise can have a huge impact on weight and health, a healthy lifestyle needs to include both proper nutrition and exercise. Learn more about exercise at http://nodiet4me.com/exercise/ .

Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
Scoop.it!

Paracetamol ‘no good for back pain'

Paracetamol ‘no good for back pain' | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
Paracetamol is ineffective at treating back pain and osteoarthritis despite being a recommended treatment, a group of Australian researchers warns.

Via Peter Mellow
more...
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
Scoop.it!

How sleep can make you a better leader - CNN.com

How sleep can make you a better leader - CNN.com | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
Many successful leaders have claimed they only need 4-5 hours of precious sleep a night -- but is this really the best for leaders?

Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Quantified Self, Data Science, Digital Health, Personal Analytics, Big Data
Scoop.it!

How Fitbit's CEO Sees a Future In the Medical Industry

How Fitbit's CEO Sees a Future In the Medical Industry | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
How Fitbit’s CEO Sees a Future In the Medical Industry

Via JP DOUMENG
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Trending in Uganda
Scoop.it!

My Africa: The competing visions of Africa's future

My Africa: The competing visions of Africa's future | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
The BBC's Alan Kasujja returns to his native Uganda to meet the young entrepreneurs aiming to create a "new" Africa - while still dealing with the "old".

Via Ugtrendz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
Scoop.it!

Water: What you need to know about keeping hydrated

Water: What you need to know about keeping hydrated | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
For two decades, we've been encouraged — some might say hounded — into making drinking water a habit. We carry it in plastic bottles, reusable canisters, on our backs to suck through elaborate tubing. We might even hire a doctor to have it injected into our veins.

Via Peter Mellow
more...
Dorothy Waxman's curator insight, March 30, 2015 11:16 AM

Not rocket science.

Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social Media to Improve Care in Cosmetic Dermatology

Social Media to Improve Care in Cosmetic Dermatology | Health and Technology | Scoop.it

BACKGROUND

Social media sites, composed of providers, patients, and their social circles, facilitate health and healthcare delivery.

OBJECTIVE

To examine patients' perspective on social media as an information source, communication tool, and referral service through an anonymous survey. In addition, influences on patient Internet personas, an actively constructed online identity, around the time of cosmetic procedures are examined.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Patients completed an anonymous institutional review board-approved survey during their initial cosmetic visit.

RESULTS

Patients are highly active on social media using it as a multipurpose tool for physician referral services, support groups, and disease education. Patients gathered dermatology information from multiple sources, including friends, family, social media pages, and other online sources, often sharing their own experiences through social media platforms. Patients indicated a desire for provider educational materials on interactive media pages. Most preferred material written by a physician, but some indicated a preference for both physician and lay material. Online images highlighting dissatisfying skin features were influential to select patients, prompting manipulation of online personas and evaluation for aesthetic procedures.

LIMITATIONS

Although the study examines cosmetic patient perspectives, data highlight valuable trends for all dermatologists.

CONCLUSION

Social media can improve patient education, collaboration, recruitment, and online professional image, leading to healthier patient-centered care.


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Adding value to global health-related events: Eight simple Twitter tips

Adding value to global health-related events: Eight simple Twitter tips | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
We help health, development and environment organizations achieve greater impact through writing, editing, design and strategic planning services.

Via Plus91
more...
Hupertan's curator insight, March 29, 2015 5:26 PM

8 tips for your #E-reputation and the eHealth

Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Trending in Uganda
Scoop.it!

EA!OFFICIAL: Kenya, Uganda, South Africa & Nigeria Top TEF’s $100m Entrepreneurship Programme

EA!OFFICIAL: Kenya, Uganda, South Africa & Nigeria Top TEF’s $100m Entrepreneurship Programme | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
eaofficial, fameafrica, africa, entrepreneurs, tef, african, elumelu, tony, tony elumelu, african entrepreneurs, programme, winners, selection, entrepreneurship, teep,...

Via Ugtrendz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Quantified Self, Data Science, Digital Health, Personal Analytics, Big Data
Scoop.it!

[INFOGRAPHIC] The Complicated, Evolving World of mHealth

[INFOGRAPHIC] The Complicated, Evolving World of mHealth | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
[INFOGRAPHIC] The Complicated, Evolving World of mHealth

Via JP DOUMENG
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social Media and Diabetes: Can Facebook and Skype Improve Glucose Control in Patients

Social Media and Diabetes: Can Facebook and Skype Improve Glucose Control in Patients | Health and Technology | Scoop.it

Social Media and Diabetes: Can Facebook and Skype Improve Glucose Control in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes on Pump Therapy? One-Year Experience

Social Media and Diabetes: Can Facebook and Skype Improve Glucose Control in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes on Pump Therapy? One-Year Experience University Clinic of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders, Medical Faculty, Skopje, Macedonia Corresponding author: Goran Petrovski, goran.endo@gmail.com. 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. - Health care providers are faced with enormous numbers of patients and visits due to the increase in diabetes prevalence (1). As the world is changing, traditional health care services should be adapted for the new era of technology and Internet. Patients use Internet to seek, meet, and interact with a community of patients with similar problems; to share clinical information; and to provide and receive support (2,3). Facebook, with over 1.2 billion registered users worldwide, (4) has specific groups for disease information. The Facebook group Diabetes Macedonia was formed in 2008. It is a closed group that helps patients to share diabetes information and experience. The enormous growth of new users (1,430 patients, family members, and others by September 2014) led to the development of a structured platform by health care providers to adjust and correct the information posted by patients, if needed. The aims of the study were to evaluate results from social media (Skype and Facebook) and CareLink software as tools to improve diabetes control in patients with type 1 diabetes using insulin pumps with glucose sensors. To our knowledge, this is the first study where Facebook is used as treatment alternative to regular clinic visits. A total of 56 children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, ages 1423, were randomized in two groups: Regular group and Internet group. The Regular group is composed of 29 patients who were treated using standard medical protocol with regular visits at clinic. Data were uploaded at the clinic and interventions (pump settings, basal bolus insulin, and education) were given to the patient by health care professionals. The Internet group was composed of 27 patients who were treated using CareLink software (Medtronic Diabetes). Data were uploaded by the patient at home and interventions (same as Regular group) were given via Facebook (chats) and Skype (sound and video). Both groups had improved A1C at 12 months (Regular group: 7.7 6 1.6% [61 6 17.5 mmol/mol] at baseline vs. 6.6 6 1.5% [49 6 16.4 mmol/mol] at 12 months; Internet group: 7.8 6 1.9% [62 6 20.8 mmol/mol] at baseline vs. 6.4 6 1.6% [46 6 17.5 mmol/mol] at 12 months, P , 0.05 at 12 months) (Table 1). Internet visits were performed with Facebook (54%), Skype (12%), and both Facebook and Skype (34%). Improvement occurred in the first 6 months and was maintained for 6 additional months. There were no differences in acute complications (diabetic ketoacidosis and severe hypoglycemia events), total daily dose of insulin, and weight change in both groups at 12 months. Personalization, presentation, and participation in social media and health care (5) can be tailored to the priorities of the patients. Every Internet visit was personalized with patient needs (appointment date and time) and used active patient participation in the decision-making process of diabetes management. We found that social media use allows patients to gain diabetes knowledge and information and interact in their daily insulin adjustments. Moreover, it could help patients cope better with their daily life. This brief trial suggests that patients prefer to communicate with their health care providers using social media. Facebook and Skype can improve diabetes control similar to regular clinic visits. Acknowledgments. The authors would like to thank all the children and adolescents and their families who participated in the study with great enthusiasm. Duality of Interest. No potential conflicts of interest relevant to this article were reported. Author Contributions. G.P. performed the study concept and design, data acquisition, statistical analysis and interpretation of data, drafting of the manuscript, and clinical revision of the manuscript. M.Z. performed statistical analysis and interpretation of data, drafting of the manuscript, and clinical revision of the manuscript. S.S.S. performed statistical analysis and interpretation of data. G.P. is the guarantor of this work and, as such, had full access to all the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. References 1. Boyle JP, Honeycutt AA, Narayan KMV, et al. Projection of diabetes burden through 2050: impact of changing demography and disease e52 Social Media in Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes Table 1Clinical characteristics of patients enrolled in the study Internet group Men/women (n) Diabetes duration (years) BMI (kg/m2) Baseline TDD insulin (units) Data are shown as mean 6 SD. TDD, total daily dose. 16.9 6 2.7 5.6 6 2.1 22.4 6 3.8 48.6 6 1.9 17.4 6 2.4 5.4 6 2.8 21.7 6 3.4 45.4 6 2.1 prevalence in the U.S. Diabetes Care 2001 ; 24 : 1936 - 1940 2. Ravert RD , Hancock MD , Ingersoll GM . Online forum messages posted by adolescents with type 1 diabetes . Diabetes Educ 2004 ; 30 : 827 - 834 3. Farmer AD , Bruckner Holt CE , Cook MJ , Hearing SD . Social networking sites: a novel portal for communication . Postgrad Med J 2009 ; 85 : 455 - 459 4. Zuckerberg M. Is connectivity a human right ? [Internet]. Available from https://www .facebook.com/isconnectivityahumanright. Accessed 8 January 2014 5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The health communicator's social media toolkit [Internet], 2011 . Available from http://www.cdc .gov/healthcommunication/ToolsTemplates/ SocialMediaToolkit_BM.pdf. Accessed 17 September 2013

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Following the Social Media Rules for Pharma and Medical Device Companies

Following the Social Media Rules for Pharma and Medical Device Companies | Health and Technology | Scoop.it

"To tweet or not to tweet?" is often the question for pharmaceutical and medical device companies when it comes to advertising their products in the burgeoning social media environment.

The very specific rules the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has regarding marketing for drugs and devices makes it difficult to market products on platforms like Twitter, Facebook and blogs. Counsel representing these companies should be familiar with several interpretive guidance documents the FDA released last year that help explain the agency's thinking as it grapples with emerging and future social media platforms. The issuance of guidance on social media was required by the 2012 "Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act" (FDASIA), Section 1121. This required the FDA to, by August 2014, "issue guidance that describes FDA policy regarding the promotion, using the Internet (including social media), of medical products that are regulated by [the FDA]." The FDA complied and issued three sets of guidance related to social media in 2014, with two more still pending. Though these guidance documents are not regulations, they represent the FDA's current thinking and best practice is to follow and comply with them.

Spatially Challenged

One of the guidance documents addresses social media platforms with limited character spacing. The most common example of such a platform is Twitter, which is limited to 140 characters for a single tweet. The FDA guidance says that if an "accurate and balanced" presentation of both risks and benefits is not possible within the constraints of the specific platform, the company should reconsider using that platform. In other words, if a company cannot present both the benefits and the warnings and risks about a product in the space provided, it should not advertise it there.

The FDA rules on labeling govern how a company is allowed to market its product. The agency requires company advertising to meet several requirements: be truthful and non-misleading (FD&C Act 502(a), 201(n)); include certain information, such as the indicated use and risks (21 CFR 201.100(d), 201.105(d), 801.109(d)); be prominently placed on the label; and any advertisement that makes representations about drugs must include certain risk information (502(n), 21 CFR 202.1). Advertising on social media must be presented in a fair and balanced way.

Handling Misinformation

Most of us are familiar with Internet "trolls," those sometimes angry and often misinformed commenters to online articles or blog posts. What happens, however, when someone posts something online about your client's medical device or drug that is false? What if, say, this person posts that the drug is dangerous and caused Side Effect X and killed his elderly mother who had diabetes? What if the company knows the drug does not cause Side Effect X, or the drug was specifically labeled warning people with diabetes to not take it? It is these types of situations where a company may feel the need to say something—so others do not take the drug incorrectly and to protect its brand.

The FDA has issued guidance on this type of situation. The agency understands a company cannot be the sheriff of the Internet and correct, much less know about, each instance of someone saying something wrong about a company's product. Its guidance states a company is not responsible for user-generated content on social media platforms it does not operate or control. This means that if misinformation is generated in a tweet or Facebook post, the company has the option, but not the obligation, to post something and correct the misinformed poster. However, if the post is on the company's page, or in a forum the company hosts, then it is responsible for setting the record straight.

Whether the company is obligated to respond to misinformation or voluntarily chooses to respond, the FDA guidance sets forth the following specific things the company must do when responding.

1. Be relevant and responsive to the misinformation

2. Tailor the message to the misinformation

3. Be non-promotional in nature, tone and presentation

4. Be accurate

5. Be consistent with the FDA-required labeling

6. Be supported by sufficient evidence

7. Post in conjunction with the misinformation in the same area or forum

8. Disclose the person providing corrective information affiliated with the company that makes the product

Legal Implications of Social Media Rules

The FDA guidance leaves open the issue of liability faced by drug and device companies, even if complying with the rules. Specifically, "failure to warn" claims are possible for a company advertising on social media. Even if it complies with the FDA guidance, a company can still face liability over its labeling. If, for example, a company decides to tweet and tries to highlight the use of the drug with its risk, what if it only includes the most significant risk and not others? Will that expose the company to a failure to warn claim?

In addition to product liability, social media advertising raises the issue of competitors having the ability to bring suit under the Lanham Act (15 U.S.C. §1525). This law allows a private right of action so a party may sue a competitor for any false or misleading description or representation of fact which

" … in commercial advertising or promotion, misrepresents the nature, characteristics, qualities, or geographic origin of his or her or another person's goods, services or commercial activities." Pharmaceutical companies can face Lanham Act liability for many types of claims, including minimizing risks, broadening indications, overstating efficacy and making comparative claims in the absence of supporting head-to-head clinical data.



Read more: http://www.therecorder.com/id=1202721749266/Following-the-Social-Media-Rules-for-Pharma-and-Medical-Device-Companies#ixzz3VZElZUQy

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social Media and Cyber-Risk

Social Media and Cyber-Risk | Health and Technology | Scoop.it

On Wednesday, March 18, 2015, physicians in Northern Virginia met for a special luncheon presentation on cyber-risk, hosted by the Medical Society of Northern Virginia.The luncheon was well attended by physicians and practice managers who were interested that learned from others’ unfortunate mistakes. The speaker, Jason Newton, Associate General Counsel with Medical Mutual Insurance Company of N.C., covered many aspects of cyber-risk in the medical practice including:

• Concepts and ramifications of electronically stored information 

• The ever-growing world of online reviews of medical practices 

• Responsible use of online social identities via outlets like Twitter and Facebook 

• Cautionary tales about traps of EHR documentation 

• Basic steps physicians should take in their professional and private lives to protect themselves from cyber-risk

Patient’s access to new technology presents potential technological traps in your practice.  For example, do you allow your patients to record (visual and/or sound) an office visit, consultation or procedure?  Might a patient have recorded these without your knowledge? These are just two more issues to keep in mind when thinking about technology use in your practice-it works both ways-both the technology you use, and the technology that the patient may use..

There are many new factors to consider in today’s practice, and while it may seem impossible to keep up, Mr. Newton provided some great tips and guidelines on what your practice can do to prevent and protect yourself from social media exposures.

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
Scoop.it!

American Medical Schools Aren't Teaching the Importance of Exercise

American Medical Schools Aren't Teaching the Importance of Exercise | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
"I was surprised that medical schools didn’t spend more time on it"

Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Trending in Uganda
Scoop.it!

Anthony Faulkner Coming To Uganda At The Gway Charity Concert – GLOW MAGAZINE UG

Anthony Faulkner Coming To Uganda At The Gway Charity Concert – GLOW MAGAZINE UG | Health and Technology | Scoop.it

Via Ugtrendz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Health and Technology
Scoop.it!

Water: What you need to know about keeping hydrated

Water: What you need to know about keeping hydrated | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
For two decades, we've been encouraged — some might say hounded — into making drinking water a habit. We carry it in plastic bottles, reusable canisters, on our backs to suck through elaborate tubing. We might even hire a doctor to have it injected into our veins.

Via Peter Mellow, John Mark Bwanika
more...
Dorothy Waxman's curator insight, March 30, 2015 11:16 AM

Not rocket science.

Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Quantified Self, Data Science, Digital Health, Personal Analytics, Big Data
Scoop.it!

Smart clothes: The next big fitness craze?

Smart clothes: The next big fitness craze? | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
Smart clothes: The next big fitness craze?

Via JP DOUMENG
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
Scoop.it!

Apple collected over 18,000 hours of fitness data for the Apple Watch

Apple collected over 18,000 hours of fitness data for the Apple Watch | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
As the hype for the impending Apple Watch continues, the company gave Good Morning America on ABC news in the US a rare look into their fitness lab.

Via Peter Mellow
more...
Peter Mellow's curator insight, March 30, 2015 10:46 PM

The video at the bottom of this article is impressive!

Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

University develops program to turn social media into adverse drug reaction data

University develops program to turn social media into adverse drug reaction data | Health and Technology | Scoop.it

A computer science and engineering team from the Carlos III Universidad in Madrid (UC3M) found a way to convert forum posts and social-media comments into adverse drug reaction reports.

The group used natural language processing to “translate social media descriptions of experiences with medicines into structured, codified data that can be used in comparative studies to identify patterns and trends,” In-Pharma Technologist reported Wednesday.

The prototype software analyzes big swaths of online data for mentions of drugs, illnesses and adverse effects, the news outlet wrote. The system also recognizes drugs by both their generic and branded names as well as their active ingredients.

A paper on the subject has been submitted for publication to the journal BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making.

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
Scoop.it!

17 Ways to Lose Weight When You Have No Time

17 Ways to Lose Weight When You Have No Time | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
Trust us, you're not too busy for these easy tips

Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Mark Bwanika from Quantified Self, Data Science, Digital Health, Personal Analytics, Big Data
Scoop.it!

Hacking Habits: How To Make New Behaviors Last For Good

Hacking Habits: How To Make New Behaviors Last For Good | Health and Technology | Scoop.it
Hacking Habits: How To Make New Behaviors Last For Good

Via JP DOUMENG
more...
No comment yet.