HIV-AIDS in America
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HIV-AIDS in America
Learn how HIV/AIDS is still present in America.
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FDA Approves First Drug To Prevent HIV Infection

The drug was approved for people who test negative for HIV infection. It's supposed to be used in combination with safe-sex practices, such as using a condom, to reduce infection risk. The daily pill Truvada, made by Gilead Sciences, combines two medicines that inhibit the reproduction of HIV.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Research: HIV/AIDS result sends shockwaves through the African American community

Even with treatment advances, an HIV diagnosis can be devastating news- as many Americans still consider it a death sentence. Press TV's Gary Anthony Ramsay ...

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Scientists make curing HIV a priority

Scientists make curing HIV a priority | HIV-AIDS in America | Scoop.it

An influential group of scientists gathered this week at the International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C. , is committing to a goal that just five years ago would have seemed ludicrous: to cure HIV . Once seen as impossible, a cure is now viewed as a realistic goal by more and more researchers, who argue the epidemic cannot be contained through treatment and prevention alone.

 

After studying the virus for more than 30 years and developing potent drugs that transformed the disease from a death sentence into a manageable chronic condition, a growing number of researchers now say the search for a cure should be a major research priority. While acknowledging substantial challenges, they argue that the effort is necessary because the epidemic cannot be contained through treatment and prevention alone. And recent medical and scientific advances — including the case of the first man definitively cured of HIV — offer proof that it's possible.

 

Spearheading this audacious challenge is the International AIDS Society, which developed a research agenda in collaboration with more than 40 scientists led by French virologist Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, who won the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in 2008 for her role in the discovery of HIV. Two years in the making, the scientific strategy provides a road map for moving research for a cure forward. Among the tasks: investigating where and how the virus can hide out in the body and studying the immune response of the select group of people who are naturally immune to HIV.

 

Developing drugs that keep HIV in check has so far proved more feasible than trying to eradicate it, said Dr. Steven Deeks, a member of the AIDS Research Institute at UC San Francisco. But now that more than 20 antiretroviral therapies can prolong the lives of people with HIV for decades, he said, it's time to aim higher. The antiretroviral drugs are lifesaving, but they have problems. Treatment is toxic and expensive, and only about half of the world's 34 million people living with HIV who need the drugs can get them. Patients must take the drugs daily for the rest of their lives to keep the virus at bay.

 

Efforts to flush the virus from its hiding places are showing signs of progress. For instance, giving patients a drug called a histone deacetylase inhibitor can prompt HIV to wake up and start producing proteins. Another approach to a functional cure involves gene therapy to modify a patient's DNA so that it produces immune cells with a disabled CCR5 gene. The future will tell which approach proves to be the most viable one.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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