History of Immunology
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History of Immunology
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Professor Denis (Denny) Anthony Mitchison (1919-2018): Leading Pioneer of Twentieth-Century Research on Tuberculosis –

Professor Denis (Denny) Anthony Mitchison (1919-2018): Leading Pioneer of Twentieth-Century Research on Tuberculosis – | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
Professor Denis (Denny) Anthony Mitchison (1919-2018) Leading Pioneer of Twentieth-Century Research on Tuberculosis  By Amina Jindani MD. FRCP Scientific Advisor – World Without TB, Coordinator INTERTB St George’s, University of London.
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Societe française d'histoire de la médecine (SFHM)

recherche "immunologie"

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Gaps in the Clinical Management of Influenza: A Century Since the 1918 Pandemic | Infectious Diseases | JAMA | JAMA Network

Gaps in the Clinical Management of Influenza: A Century Since the 1918 Pandemic | Infectious Diseases | JAMA | JAMA Network | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
This Viewpoint reviews advances in the surveillance, diagnosis, and treatment of influenza since the 1918 pandemic, and identifies key clinical questions to address in advance of the next outbreak, including optimal treatment for hospitalized and critically ill patients and those wit
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From Cancer Immune Surveillance to Cancer Immunoediting: Birth of Modern Immuno-Oncology

From Cancer Immune Surveillance to Cancer Immunoediting: Birth of Modern Immuno-Oncology | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
We were at the dawn of the millennium. Cancer science was dominated by genomic studies that established that the disease results from modifications of genes in somatic cells by mutations, amplifications, or deletions, allowing limitless replication of the transformed cells.
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Pandemic flu

Pandemic flu | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
Pandemic Influenza: 100 years
The Lancet is committed to publishing the best science on influenza, and has been at the heart of international research on pandemic flu for over 100 years. To mark the centenary, we have highlighted some historical and leading papers. Register to access.
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Ask a CDC Scientist: Dr. Terrence Tumpey and the Reconstruction of the 1918 Pandemic Virus | Pandemic Influenza (Flu) | CDC

Ask a CDC Scientist: Dr. Terrence Tumpey and the Reconstruction of the 1918 Pandemic Virus | Pandemic Influenza (Flu) | CDC | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
Everything you need to know about the flu illness, including symptoms, treatment and prevention.

Via Ed Rybicki, Chris Upton + helpers
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150th anniversary of clinical description of multiple sclerosis

150th anniversary of clinical description of multiple sclerosis | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
The clinical features of multiple sclerosis were first defined in detail and with pathologic confirmation in a medical thesis published at the Salpêtrière, Paris, in 1868. The author, Leopold Ordenstein (1835–1902), a German physician, analyzed cases collected by his mentor, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825–1893). The 2 clinician-scientists described the characteristic symptoms, predisposing age, and pathologic features of the disease, and emphasized the clear delineation from other chronic progressive disorders, especially paralysis agitans. The latter was referred to as Parkinson disease by William Sanders in 1865 and adopted by Désiré-Magloire Bourneville on behalf of Charcot in 1875. This essay commemorates the 150th anniversary of the publication of the pioneering work of Leopold Ordenstein and Jean-Martin Charcot.

Via Krishan Maggon
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Who was SPL Sorensen? Google Doodle celebrates Danish chemist who invented pH scale measuring acidity and alkalinity - Mirror Online

Who was SPL Sorensen? Google Doodle celebrates Danish chemist who invented pH scale measuring acidity and alkalinity - Mirror Online | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
The chemist's scale is important in fields including chemistry, medicine and water treatment...
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Role of Immunologists in the Development of Health Care System | Insight Medical Publishing

Role of Immunologists in the Development of Health Care System | Insight Medical Publishing | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
Role of Immunologists in the Development of Health Care System, ASM Giasuddin...
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Forgotten Britons from Walter Tull Patrick Matthew and Mary Astell | Daily

Forgotten Britons from Walter Tull Patrick Matthew and Mary Astell | Daily | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
It is often said that history is written by those who are victorious, but a new list of astonishing yet little-known Britons from throughout the ages suggests this notion was not always the case.
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Final donation for man whose blood helped save 2.4 million babies

Final donation for man whose blood helped save 2.4 million babies | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
On Friday, after 1173 bags of blood and 2.4 million babies saved, Anti-D pioneer James Harrison made his last blood donation.
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In the Beginning Was Sm

In the Beginning Was Sm | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
Up to 1966, it was known that sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)[2][1] have Abs with specificities against DNA and nucleoprotein. Eng Tan and Henry Kunkel ([1][2]) observed, while performing experiments to detect precipitating Abs using the Ouchterlony agar diffusion method,
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merci à"lexterneduchu" de Twitter https://twitter.com/lexterneduchu

qui avait retrouvé ce papier

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Fred Sanger at the LMB

Fred Sanger at the LMB: From DNA sequencing to the advent of genomics   One modest, reserved man, working at the lab bench in a small laboratory in Cambridge, invented a technique that would be used worldwide and would forever change how problems in biology and medicine were viewed. That man was Fred Sanger, born 100 years ago on 13th August 1918, and the technique he developed was dideoxy sequencing of DNA. By the time Fred worked on the sequencing of DNA, he had already developed a method for sequencing proteins, in particular working out the chemical structure, or sequence, of insulin. This involved determining the order of amino acids, the base units that make up proteins. In 1958, Fred was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for this work.“This award had an important and stimulating effect on my subsequent career. This recognition of my work gave me renewed confidence and enthusiasm to continue in this way of life, which I enjoyed.” Fred Sanger, Les Prix Nobel, 1980. “There was a lot of pressure to get on to DNA, particularly from Crick. He was always around the lab talking to people about DNA. I found that very useful.” Fred Sanger, The Biochemist, 27, 31-39, 2005. In 1962, Fred, along with fellow MRC funded scientists, Max Perutz, Francis Crick, John Kendrew and Sydney Brenner, moved into the newly built MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB), on the outskirts of Cambridge. And Fred began to look at the problem of sequencing nucleic acids. At this point very little was known about sequencing nucleic acids and there were two main problems to overcome: the only known nucleic acids were very large, and consisted of only four components – the four different bases. With the techniques available at the time a sequence with only four elements was much more difficult to solve than a sequence with 20 elements. So why did Fred attempt this?   “Because of its intrinsic fascination and my conviction that a knowledge of sequences could contribute much to our understanding of living matter.” Fred Sanger, Les Prix Nobel, 1980. Through the work to develop this technique, a number of important milestones and discoveries were made. The specimen used for the work was phiX174 bacteriophage, a single-stranded DNA virus – it became the first fully sequenced genome, when Fred and his team published their paper in 1977. Fred’s work also showed, for the first time, three important aspects of genetics: “Fred was the first to directly confirm the genetic code, the first to discover the unexpected phenomenon of ‘overlapping genes’ and the first to show that the genetic code could vary in different organisms.” George Brownlee, Fred Sanger double Nobel laureate: a biography, 2014. For this work, Fred, in 1980, was awarded his second Nobel Prize in Chemistry. He is one of only four people to have received two Nobel Prizes The only British scientist to have received two Nobel Prizes The only person to have been awarded two Nobel Prizes in Chemistry   “To win a second Nobel prize is so remarkable an achievement that we are all lost in admiration.” Margaret Thatcher, Prime Minister, in a letter to Fred Sanger, 16 October 1980. The dideoxy technique was developed further, so the method became quicker and more and more data was collected. Computational programs were designed at the LMB for organising and analysing the data, and the technique itself was suitably automated by others. This would become key to the worldwide success of the technique, and for the completion of the highly ambitious project to sequence the complete human genome: all three billion nucleotide base pairs. This gave scientists the chance to look at the genetic basis of diseases, such as cancer, and to predict susceptibility to such diseases. It also made the development of personalised medicine possible and enabled the study of genetic evolution and ecology, and much, much more. Few people outside of the world of science have heard of Fred Sanger, but in this field he is one of the most influential scientists of the twentieth century: an inspiration, a pioneer and the ‘father of genomics’. “Fred Sanger was a modest, reserved man but to his colleagues and friends he always had a vision. He was a pioneer and a leader.” George Brownlee. Biogr. Mems. Fell. R. Soc. 61, 437-466, 2015. “Sanger was happiest at the laboratory bench, where he worked tirelessly and single-mindedly. He performed elegant experiments with simple apparatus to solve extremely difficult problems. In so doing, he inspired younger scientists and attracted some of the best biologists in the world to Cambridge.” John Walker, Nature, 505: 27, 2014.   Fred, himself, explained what being a scientist meant to him:   “I believe that we have been doing this not primarily to achieve riches or even honour, but rather because we were interested in the work, enjoyed doing it and felt very strongly that it was worthwhile … Scientific research is one of the most exciting and rewarding of occupations. It is like a voyage of discovery into unknown lands, seeking not for new territory but for new knowledge. It should appeal to those with a good sense of adventure.” Fred Sanger, Nobel Banquet Speech, 1980. Fred Sanger: 13th August 1918 – 19th November 2013
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To Solve a Medical Mystery, This Doctor Drank Live Bacteria

To Solve a Medical Mystery, This Doctor Drank Live Bacteria | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
Dr. Barry Marshall swallowed helicobacter pylori to prove it was the cause of a common ailment.
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Sur les phénomènes d’agglutination du sang humain normal

Sur les phénomènes d’agglutination du sang humain normal | History of Immunology | Scoop.it

par JP Aymard, décédé récemment

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Whooping cough vaccine: The power of first impressions

Whooping cough vaccine: The power of first impressions | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
The current whooping cough vaccine was universally adopted in the US in 1996 to replace the original vaccine based on killed Bordetella pertussis because of a stronger safety profile. The new formulation was found to be effective in preventing whooping cough during vulnerable stages in the lifespan but the kind of pertussis vaccine used to prime the immune system leaves a lasting impression. In their latest study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LJI) report that individuals who had been inoculated with the newer vaccine as part of their initial series of shots, mount a weaker recall response when receiving booster shots later on.
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Blood stem cells: the pioneers of stem cell research | Eurostemcell

Blood stem cells were the first stem cells to be identified. Their discovery in the 1960s marked the beginning of stem cell research. Today, researchers continue to learn from blood stem cells and are working to identify new ways to use them in the clinic.

Via Krishan Maggon
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How to Make Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS)

How to Make Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
PBS is a commonly used buffer for immunohistochemical staining used as a wash solution and diluting antibodies. This PBS recipe is relatively simple.
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Day of Immunology in Australia and New Zealand - Khoury - 2017 - European Journal of Immunology - Wiley Online Library

Day of Immunology in Australia and New Zealand - Khoury - 2017 - European Journal of Immunology - Wiley Online Library | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
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Mini-antibodies discovered in sharks and camels could lead to drugs for cancer and other diseases

Mini-antibodies discovered in sharks and camels could lead to drugs for cancer and other diseases | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
Unusual immune proteins are a boon for research and are starting to hit the clinic
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History of Stem Cells | Mesenchymal Stem Cells

History of Stem Cells | Mesenchymal Stem Cells | History of Immunology | Scoop.it
Tracing the history of stem cells such as Mesenchymal Stem Cells is crucial in learning stem cell transplant. Read on to know more.
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