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BREAKING: Vatican To Posthumously Grant Henry VIII Annulment; Queen To Dissolve Church Of England   | Eye of the Tiber

BREAKING: Vatican To Posthumously Grant Henry VIII Annulment; Queen To Dissolve Church Of England   | Eye of the Tiber | History | Scoop.it
Sources in the Vatican are now confirming that Pope Francis has agreed to posthumously grant King Henry VIII an annulment from Catherine of Aragon. Numerous
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Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks | History | Scoop.it

The roots of the bus boycott began years before the arrest of Rosa Parks. The Womens’ Political Council (WPC), a group of black professionals founded in 1946, had already turned their attention to Jim Crow practices on the Montgomery city buses. In a meeting with Mayor W. A. Gayle in March 1954, the council's members outlined the changes they sought for Montgomery’s bus system: no one standing over empty seats; a decree that black individuals not be made to pay at the front of the bus and enter from the rear; and a policy that would require buses to stop at every corner in black residential areas, as they did in white communities. When the meeting failed to produce any meaningful change, WPC president Jo Ann Robinson reiterated the council’s requests in a 21 May letter to Mayor Gayle, telling him, ‘‘there has been talk from twenty-five or more local organizations of planning a city-wide boycott of busses’’(‘‘A Letter from the Women’s Political Council’’).

 

A year after the WPC’s meeting with Mayor Gayle, a 15-year-old named Claudette Colvin was arrested for challenging segregation on a Montgomery bus. Seven months later, 18-year-old Mary Louise Smith was arrested for refusing to yield her seat to a white passenger. Neither arrest, however, mobilized Montgomery’s black community like that of Rosa Parks later that year.

 

King recalled in his memoir that ‘‘Mrs. Parks was ideal for the role assigned to her by history,’’ and because ‘‘her character was impeccable and her dedication deep-rooted’’ she was ‘‘one of the most respected people in the Negro community’’ (King, 44). 

 

The bus incident led to the formation of the Montgomery Improvement Association, led by the young pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The association called for a boycott of the city-owned bus company. The boycott lasted 382 days and brought Mrs. Parks, Dr. King, and their cause to the attention of the world. A Supreme Court Decision struck down the Montgomery ordinance under which Mrs. Parks had been fined, and outlawed racial segregation on public transportation.

 

 

"Montgomery Bus Boycott (1955-1956)." King Institute Home. The Martin LutherKing Jr. Research and Education Institute, 1999. Web. 28 Apr. 2012. 

 

 

Read the passage above and answer the following questions:

 

1. Name two of the changes the WPC asked for from the Montgomery bus system.
2. Was Rosa Parks the first African-American woman to be arrested for challenging segregation on the buses?
3. Why did Dr. King thing Rosa Parks was the ideal candidate for challenging segregation?
4. What group was created as a result of Parks being arrested? Who was the head of the organization?
5. How long did the bus boycott last? What was the final decision of the Supreme Court in regards to segregation on buses?

 

 


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Aaliyah Lawson's curator insight, March 3, 2015 7:49 PM

This is when the Montgomery bus boycott really began. Rosa Parks really made that come about. When she refused to give up her seat on the bus.

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Celebrate Black History Month

Celebrate Black History Month | History | Scoop.it
Historical Times articles, lesson plans, crosswords, multimedia and more from The Learning Network and the New York Times.
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The Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad | History | Scoop.it
You are a slave in Maryland in the 1800s. Can you escape? Learn what challenges slaves faced in National Geographic's Underground Railroad adventure. Get information, pictures, photographs, biographies, resources, and more.
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Students Become World Explorers With This App

Students Become World Explorers With This App | History | Scoop.it

"European Exploration: The Age of Discovery is a free iPad app that puts students in charge of exploring the “New World.” In the game students are in charge of selecting explorers and ships to send out to the New World. Students have to manage the finances of their expeditions so that they don’t run out of money before they can return home safely."


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Free Technology for Teachers: European Exploration - A Game for Learning About The Age of Discovery

Free Technology for Teachers: European Exploration - A Game for Learning About The Age of Discovery | History | Scoop.it

"Last week Glenn Wiebe http://ow.ly/foKFR ; published a list of iPad apps for history teachers. One item in that list that was new to me was European Exploration: The Age of Discovery http://ow.ly/foKC6   This free iPad app puts students in charge of exploring the "New World." In the game students are in charge of selecting explorers and ships to send out to the New World. Students have to manage the finances of their expeditions so that they don't run out of money before they can return home safely."


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Who Started World War I: Crash Course World History 210 - YouTube

In which John Green teaches you WHY World War I started. Or tries to anyway. With this kind of thing, it's kind of hard to assign blame to any one of the nat...

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The First Voyage of Christopher Columbus

The First Voyage of Christopher Columbus | History | Scoop.it
Christopher Columbus, explorer, navigator and colonizer, sailed to the New World in 1492 and three other times. Learn about the hardships and joys he encountered on his first voyage.
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Christopher Columbus was awful (but this other guy was not) - The Oatmeal

Christopher Columbus was awful (but this other guy was not) - The Oatmeal | History | Scoop.it

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It's a church. It's a mosque. It's Hagia Sophia. - Kelly Wall - YouTube

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/it-s-a-church-it-s-a-mosque-it-s-hagia-sophia-kelly-wall If walls could talk, Turkey's Hagia Sophia would have an...

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What was the Age of Discovery?

What was the Age of Discovery? | History | Scoop.it
The Age of Discovery was a period in global history during which many European and Asian nations established new trade routes and...
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Wooden Ship Unearthed at World Trade Center Site From Revolutionary-Era Philadelphia

Wooden Ship Unearthed at World Trade Center Site From Revolutionary-Era Philadelphia | History | Scoop.it

A wooden ship unearthed at the World Trade Center site is dated to Revolutionary-Era Philadelphia, according to clues contained in tree rings.

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Henry VIII ("Money, Money, Money" by ABBA)

Need to learn about the six wives of Henry VIII? Watch this, and you'll be able to sing about them. In your sleep.
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Freedom Riders

Freedom Riders | History | Scoop.it

The mob was already waiting for James Zwerg by the time the Greyhound bus eased into the station in Montgomery, Alabama.

 

Looking out the window, Zwerg could see men gripping baseball bats, chains and clubs. They had sealed off the streets leading to the bus station and chased away news photographers. They didn't want anyone to witness what they were about to do.

Zwerg accepted his worst fear: He was going to die today.

 

Only the night before, Zwerg had prayed for the strength to not strike back in anger. He was among the 18 white and black college students from Nashville who had decided to take the bus trip through the segregated South in 1961. They called themselves Freedom Riders. Their goal was to desegregate public transportation.

 

He was drawn to the Freedom Rides after he was assigned a black roommate while attending Beloit College in Wisconsin. He grew to admire his roommate and was shocked to see how the young man was treated by whites when they went out in public together. So he volunteered to be an exchange student at Fisk University in Nashville, an all-black college, for one semester. He wanted to know how it felt to be a minority.

 

Zwerg's parents were unaware of the changes taking place in their son. They were enraged when they opened their local newspaper the day after he was attacked and saw the now-famous picture of their battered son on the front page.

 

Zwerg's anguish was compounded by his father's weak heart. He suffered a heart attack after he learned his son was attacked by a mob, and his mother had a nervous breakdown. "I had a tremendous amount of guilt," he says.

Even as the years passed and he was featured in documentaries and history books, Zwerg's parents never gave their approval.

 

After he stepped off the bus, Zwerg says, the crowd grabbed him.

In "Parting the Waters," Taylor Branch wrote that the mob had swelled to 3,000 people and described what happened to Zwerg: "One of the men grabbed Zwerg's suitcase and smashed him in the face with it. Others slugged him to the ground, and when he was dazed beyond resistance, one man pinned Zwerg's head between his knees so that the others could take turns hitting him.'"

 

Yet in the midst of that savagery, Zwerg says he had the most beautiful experience in his life. "I bowed my head," he says. "I asked God to give me the strength to remain nonviolent and to forgive the people for what they might do. It was very brief, but in that instant, I felt an overwhelming presence. I don't know how else to describe it. A peace came over me. I knew that no matter what happened to me, it was going to be OK. Whether I lived or whether I died, I felt this incredible calm."

 

Zwerg blacked out and didn't wake up until he was in a car. The mob had continued to beat him after he was unconscious. Being unconscious saved his life, he believes now. His body was relaxed, so it took the punishment better than if he had stiffened up to protect himself. Incredibly, no Freedom Riders were killed during the mob attack.

 

Even after he was taken to a nearby hospital, Zwerg learned later, he was not safe. "A nurse said she drugged me the first night because there was a mob coming within a block of the hospital to lynch me," he says. "She didn't want me to be aware of anything if they got me."

 

Zwerg entered the ministry after the beating. But he left in 1975, dejected by the politics of his job.

 

He never found the bond he experienced with the other Freedom Riders. "Each of us was stronger because of those we were with," he says. "If I was being beaten, I knew I wasn't alone. I could endure more because I knew everybody there was giving me their strength. Even as someone else was being beaten, I would give them my strength."

 

 

Read the passage above and answer the following questions:

 

1. What was the goal of the Freedom Riders?
2. Why was Zwerg drawn to the Freedom Riders?
3. What happened to Zwerg when he got off the bus?
4. Why did the nurse drug him while he was at the hospital?

5. Why do you think his parents did not support him?


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Freedom Riders | PBS

Freedom Riders | PBS | History | Scoop.it

This fantastic website explains how, where, and why the riders went on their protest, and the opposition they faced. The 'issues' page is particularly relevent for learning about the ideology of the riders and the legacy they left.

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Little Rock Central:50 Years Later Clip

Opening Clip from the HBO film by the Renaud Brothers, Little Rock Central: 50 Years Later. Minnijean Brown, one of the original Little Rock Nine, revisits w...

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Ancient Voyages to America - Who Were The First Explorers? (Documentary)

Who were the first people to discover America? Historical evidence uncovers the myth of Christopher Columbus being the first to America. This documentary exp...

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The Big Bang: Crash Course Big History #1 - YouTube

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Christopher Columbus Santa Maria discovery: Archaeologists hail find as 'amazingly significant'

Christopher Columbus Santa Maria discovery: Archaeologists hail find as 'amazingly significant' | History | Scoop.it
Maritime archaeologists tonight hailed the potential discovery of the wreck of Christopher Columbus’s flagship, the Santa Maria, as “amazingly significant”.

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International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works's curator insight, May 14, 2014 6:22 AM

Remains found off the north coast of Haiti are believed by archaeologists to belong to the famous vessel Santa Maria

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Stop Saying Columbus 'Discovered' the Americas—It Erases Indigenous History

Stop Saying Columbus 'Discovered' the Americas—It Erases Indigenous History | History | Scoop.it
Referring to tribal lands as "empty" seeks to justify their theft for commercial and military exploitation. Christopher Columbus on Santa Maria in 1492. Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons Just over a ...
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The past, present and future of the bubonic plague - Sharon N. DeWitte - YouTube

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-past-present-and-future-of-the-bubonic-plague-sharon-n-dewitte The bubonic plague, which killed around 1/5 of...

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Why Study History

This video is a collection of images, quotes, and movie clips that explore the question "Why Should We Study History?"
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Interactive Time-Lapse Map Shows How the U.S. Took More Than 1.5 Billion Acres From Native Americans

Interactive Time-Lapse Map Shows How the U.S. Took More Than 1.5 Billion Acres From Native Americans | History | Scoop.it

This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887.

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