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Father Matteo Ricci: Le Marche Jesuit missionary to the China of Ming Dynasty

Father Matteo Ricci: Le Marche  Jesuit missionary to the China of Ming Dynasty | History | Scoop.it

Father Ricci's scientific acumen and enthusiasm for cultural exchange that won the trust and admiration of the Ming Dynasty Emperor Wanli. The relationship ensured that he and his Jesuit brothers would have the freedom to evangelize, the show's organizers explained in a news conference at the Vatican Oct. 28.

A proficient cartographer, Father Ricci was perhaps most appreciated for the maps of the world he made for the Chinese, who at the time had little knowledge of the other continents, said Antonio Paolucci, director of the Vatican Museums and head curator of the exhibit.

The maps Father Ricci drew, as well as many of the European scientific instruments he brought to amaze and share with his Chinese hosts, are among the many items on view in the show.

"Matteo Ricci went to China and seduced the Chinese, offering himself as a man of science: a cartographer, an astronomer, a mathematician," and by bringing instruments like astrolabes and mechanized clocks, Paolucci said.

"He was honored and admired," immersing himself so much in Chinese culture that "he became more Chinese than the Chinese," Paolucci said.


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Ming Dynasty treasures coming to Scotland

Ming Dynasty treasures coming to Scotland | History | Scoop.it
TREASURES charting the history of China’s long-running Ming dynasty are to go on display in Scotland next summer under a new cultural agreement between the two countries.
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Johannes Gutenberg Biography | Biography Online

Johannes Gutenberg Biography | Biography Online | History | Scoop.it

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, October 20, 2013 9:44 PM

The Chinese actually invented a printing press before Gutenberg but he created the printing press that was used in Europe.  This could produce mulitple lines of text at once which increased the speed and cost of books and other reading materials.

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Pan: The God of All

Pan:  The God of All | History | Scoop.it

As a god of the people Pan wasn’t worshiped in the traditional Greek way. Only in his native Arcadia was Pan worshiped in a temple, in most of the ancient world he was worshiped in caves or grottoes. The grottoes dedicated to Pan weren’t dedicated solely to him either; he generally shared his sacred space with nymphs local to the region. On the acropolis in Athens he wasn’t given a temple or even a church, it was said he resided in a crack on the side of the plateau that housed the acropolis. (The acropolis in Athens housed many temples and shrines dedicated to the ancient Greek Gods; the most magnificent structure on the top of the acropolis was the temple dedicated to Pallas Athena-the Parthenon.)

 

 


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Greek antiquities threatened by austerity plan - World - CBC News

Greek antiquities threatened by austerity plan - World - CBC News | History | Scoop.it
Sites like the Acropolis and the Parthenon have withstood tsunamis, earthquakes and the ravages of time, but some are questioning whether they can withstand the Greek debt crisis.

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Seren's curator insight, August 26, 2013 5:19 PM

Greek legiatiors and officials are coming to terms with the crumbling foundations of Greece. Anciet artifacts are being stolen out of the literally crumbling building which symbolised one of the greatest empires of the anciet world. What can history tell us about The People's disreguard of honor and tradition in times of great hardship?

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Greek Island - Images | Marc-Andre Pauze

Greek Island - Images | Marc-Andre Pauze | History | Scoop.it


Wandering in the ancient cities of Rhodes and Lindos. Walking along the caldera in Santorini, waiting for the fabulous sunset. Traveling back in time to the apogee of the Greek civilization by standing near the entrance of the Acropolis. But also, meet the people, play cards with them, taste their homemade Porto, get lost in stone paved streets and enjoy.....


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marcpauze's comment, October 4, 2013 12:44 PM
All these photos were made with the Fuji X-Pro1, the 18-55 mm lens and a few with the 18mm fix lens.
marcpauze's comment, October 4, 2013 12:45 PM
Thanks Thomas
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One of the most important myths appears in the Homeric Hymn to ...

... and wit,Hermes,Hermes was identified with the Roman god Mercury,According to prominent folklorist Yeleazar Meletinsky,perhaps via Cyprus or Cilicia well before the beginning of written records in Greece,One of the most important myths ...

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Vatican discovers first ever depiction of Native Americans hidden under 500 years of soot in ancient painting

Vatican discovers first ever depiction of Native Americans hidden under 500 years of soot in ancient painting | History | Scoop.it
In an ancient painting tucked away in the Vatican, preservationists have discovered what is believed to be the first ever depiction of the Native Americans that Christopher Columbus encountered during his first trip to the New World.

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The Visigoths Sack Rome — History.com Video

The Visigoths Sack Rome — History.com Video | History | Scoop.it
in 410 A.D. Alaric and the Visigoths sack Rome after years of holding the city under siege.

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, September 16, 2013 10:58 PM

Alaric had been trained and fought with the Romans.  He used his training to invade Rome.  The Visigoths had been living on the borders and were starving so this invasion wasn't to create his own empire but rather to save his people.

Khai Tran's curator insight, February 24, 2014 3:48 PM

Very Faithful Emperor in Rome

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The monetary systems of the Han and Roman empires

The monetary systems of the Han and Roman empires | History | Scoop.it
It is not an exaggeration to say that the existing body of research scholarship on Roman coins, money, and the monetary economy greatly exceeds corresponding scholarship on early Chinese money in terms of both volume and sophistication.

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Socrates and the Corinthians' democracy

Socrates and the Corinthians' democracy | History | Scoop.it

How Brazil's football legend turned every Corinthians' match into a political meeting for democracy.

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Travel Portal Provides Guide To Hindus Renting Villas In Sicily

Travel Portal Provides Guide To Hindus Renting Villas In Sicily | History | Scoop.it

A Hindu newspaper has recently released a guide containing activity and sightseeing suggestions for Hindus who might wish to rent villas in Sicily this summer.

Entitled '10 Things To Do In Sicily' and published as part of the Sunday magazine for popular paper 'The Hindu', the list offers a complete run-down of things to do and see in the popular Southern Italian region. Suggestions range from a visit to Mount Etna, the island's still-active volcano, or a visit to one of the many local ceramists to an exciting and informative gastronomic tour.

What stands out the most, however, is the list's somewhat marked slant towards non-Hindu religious landmarks. Readers are urged to visit the region's many chapels and churches, including the stuccoed church of Santa Zita, the Cappella Pallatina, and the Valley of The Temples, which contains some of the most beautiful examples of Greek Doric architecture in the world.

Other suggestions on the list include trips to the ruined cities of Syracuse and Noto, or to the equally ruined Villa Romana del Casale, one of the ancient villas in Sicily.

Aside from pointing out interesting places to go and activities to undertake, The Hindu's list also provides readers with all the necessary information for travelling into Italy, including details about visas, accommodation and transportation.

Villas in Sicily, this particularly in-demand island, are becoming increasingly popular to rent when it comes to holidaymaking, not only because of the region’s usually temperate climate, but also due to its historic ties. Simultaneously a part of Italy and an entity in its own right, Sicily boasts influences from the Greeks, the Phoenicians, the Cartaginians, the Romans, the Normans, the Arabs and the Spaniards, giving its culture and architecture a distinctive and very attractive flavour that draws thousands of tourists to it every year.

For information regarding villas in Sicily, contact Essential Italy at http://www.essentialitaly.co.uk/ or call 01223 460 100.


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Pan: The God of All

Pan:  The God of All | History | Scoop.it

As a god of the people Pan wasn’t worshiped in the traditional Greek way. Only in his native Arcadia was Pan worshiped in a temple, in most of the ancient world he was worshiped in caves or grottoes. The grottoes dedicated to Pan weren’t dedicated solely to him either; he generally shared his sacred space with nymphs local to the region. On the acropolis in Athens he wasn’t given a temple or even a church, it was said he resided in a crack on the side of the plateau that housed the acropolis. (The acropolis in Athens housed many temples and shrines dedicated to the ancient Greek Gods; the most magnificent structure on the top of the acropolis was the temple dedicated to Pallas Athena-the Parthenon.)

 

 


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Archaeologists find Ming Dynasty mummy in China - Telegraph

Archaeologists find Ming Dynasty mummy in China - Telegraph | History | Scoop.it
Archaeologists find 700-year-old mummified Ming Dynasty woman in China.

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Aaronee's curator insight, February 10, 2014 4:23 PM

They say they found a mummy of a women in china which she happens to be 700 years old.

Casandra Pricyla Alarcon's curator insight, February 28, 2014 12:45 AM

"I found this really interesting because the mummy looks so well put together. They did a really good job on preserving the mummy, and the ring was just beautiful. They must of made their jewelry from really good material because it didn't seem to have any rust marks on it. Even though the mummy was a bit flooded in water due to where it was buried they still managed to get it out in one piece." 

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Ming dynasty exhibition coming to Edinburgh

Ming dynasty exhibition coming to Edinburgh | History | Scoop.it

Edinburgh Evening News: The extraordinary story of the Ming dynasty is to be told in a major exhibition at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh next summer.


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Acropolis - Lonely Planet

Acropolis - Lonely Planet | History | Scoop.it
The Acropolis is the most important ancient site in the Western world. Crowned by the Parthenon, it stands sentinel over Athens, visible from...

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Archaeological site entwined with conflict - IOL SciTech

Archaeological site entwined with conflict - IOL SciTech | History | Scoop.it

Few archaeological sites seem as entwined with conflict, ancient and modern, as the city of Karkemish.The scene of a battle mentioned in the Bible, it lies smack on the border between Turkey and Syria, where civil war rages today. Twenty-first century Turkish sentries occupy an acropolis dating back more than 5,000 years, and the ruins were recently demined. Visible from crumbling, earthen ramparts, a Syrian rebel flag flies in a town that regime forces fled just months ago.

 

A Turkish-Italian team is conducting the most extensive excavations there in nearly a century, building on the work of British Museum teams that included T.E. Lawrence, the adventurer known as Lawrence of Arabia. The plan is to open the site along the Euphrates river to tourists in late 2014.

 

The strategic city, its importance long known to scholars because of references in ancient texts, was under the sway of Hittites and other imperial rulers and independent kings. However, archaeological investigation there was halted by World War I, and then by hostilities between Turkish nationalists and French colonizers from Syria who built machine gun nests in its ramparts. Part of the frontier was mined in the 1950s, and in later years, creating deadly obstacles to archaeological inquiry at a site symbolic of modern strife and intrigue.


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Acropolis Virtual Tour Application

Acropolis Virtual Tour Application | History | Scoop.it
A virtual Tour of Acropolis Athens Greece with 360 panorama and Gigapixel Images...

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A List of Evil Gods from Greek Mythology - Myth and Mythology

A List of Evil Gods from Greek Mythology - Myth and Mythology | History | Scoop.it
This short list of negative or evil gods from Greek mythology covers some of the most famous evil demons and gods who use to lurk in the realms ofunderworld as per Greek Myths.

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Stone Age Chinese People First Tamed Cattle Over 10,000 Years Ago

Stone Age Chinese People First Tamed Cattle Over 10,000 Years Ago | History | Scoop.it
A new study provides the first multi-disciplinary evidence that humans in what is now China first domesticated cattle around 8,000 BC.

 

Until now, scientists believed that humans started domesticating cattle around 10,000 years ago in the Near East, which gave rise to humpless cattle, while 2,000 years later humans began managing humped cattle in Southern Asia.

 

However, scientists from China and Europe reveal evidence for management of cattle in north-eastern China around 10,000 years ago. This indicates that Neolithic humans may have started domesticating cows in more regions around the world than was previously believed.

 

A lower jaw of an ancient cattle specimen was discovered during an excavation in north-east China, and was carbon dated to be 10,660 years old.

 

The jaw displayed a unique pattern of wear on the molars, which is best explained to be the results of long-term human management of the animal.

 

Ancient DNA from the jaw revealed that the animal did not belong to the same cattle lineages that were domesticated in the Near East and South Asia.

 

The combination of the age of the jaw, the unique wear and genetic signature suggests that this find represents the earliest evidence for cattle management in north-east China; a time and place not previously considered as potential domestication centre for cattle.

 


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Classical Italy | Florence, Siena, Assisi & Rome

For centuries Italy has drawn visitors in search of culture and romance with few countries comparing with its enormous Classical origins: its art, architecture, music, design, scenery, food or wine. Indeed Tuscany alone has more classified historical monuments than any other country, let alone province on earth. Italy's contribution to European painting and sculpture far surpasses that of any other nation beinf home to the most extensive ancient civilisation, the Renaissance, the Roman Catholic Church and the Vatican. Blend this with the striking natural beauty of the Tuscan countryside, the vitality of Rome, the effervescence inside every Italian and you have an unbeatable destination for a tour.


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Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, July 27, 2013 3:45 AM

Magnificent Rome, inspirational Florence and the legendary cities of Siena and Assisi 

Karli And Brooke's curator insight, February 11, 2015 5:18 PM

Europe Intellectual/Arts-  Italy has the most extensive ancient civilization arts, the Renaissance, the Roman Catholic Church, and the Vatican.  In the city Tuscany, they have "more classified" historical monuments than and other country of the world.  Rome has many beautiful architecture and scenery in the city.  Many Visitors have come to Italy to tour their cities.

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Family matters, Economy, culture and biology: fertility and its constraints in Roman Italy

Family matters, Economy, culture and biology: fertility and its constraints in Roman Italy | History | Scoop.it
However, the theory concerning fertility behaviour during the Late Roman Republic that has been put forward by Brunt depends largely on such viewpoints as have become controversial in the discipline of demography.

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Two Important Charts For Gold & Silver Investors

Two Important Charts For Gold & Silver Investors | History | Scoop.it
By Egon von Greyerz Founder Mattern Asset Management on King World News:

"{... The US now has a National Debt of $16.4 trillion and over $225 trillion of Federal entitlement liabilities. With 125 million people on benefits and 22% unemployed the situation is more than serious – it is desperate.

With this desperate economic situation, most people expected a different reaction to the Fed’s money printing announcement on 12.12.12. But we should have learnt by now that markets always do what they should do but not when we expect them to. Gold and silver went up on the Fed announcement but sold off afterwards and continued to be under pressure. Let us just remember that all we are seeing are little wiggles in a major secular bull market in the metals.

It is always interesting to look at historical comparisons. When the Roman Empire started to fall in the 3rd century, the Roman silver coin, the Denarius, reflected a massive bubble economy that was coming to an end. Over 100 years, the Denarius fell by around 97% as reflected by the lower silver content. The in the late 4th century the silver content fell to zero which means that the currency became worthless. For the next 200 years the silver content of the Denarius reflected a devaluation of around 99%.(see chart below). ..."
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Hal's curator insight, December 14, 2012 1:58 PM

click over for the second chart and the rest of his analysis.  "Little wiggles" I think is a great way to describe what's been happening the past several weeks.

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Linguistics Baking Part III: Phoenician | res gerendae

Linguistics Baking Part III: Phoenician | res gerendae | History | Scoop.it
... colonised by Phoenicians: Carthage, of course, is the best-known Phoenician foundation, but they also settled in other areas of Northern Africa, the Iberian Peninsula, Sardinia, and Cyprus; in the western Mediterranean Phoenician, ...

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Joel Mondragon's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:48 PM

This article explains the origin of the Phoenician language where it was believed to have originated. It also talks about the type of language it was and who were some of the people that adopted it. For example most famously known it was the basis for Greek language. 

Andreina Ruiz's curator insight, February 26, 2014 5:54 PM

Phoenicians is a language that was originally spoken in the southern Levant. The script was the basis for the Greek alphabet. It was not just an alphabet, but a script that represents consonants but not vowels.

JERRY KITH's curator insight, February 26, 2014 10:18 PM

A course on phoenicians baking during the ancient era. 

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Phoenicians discovered America 2000 yrs before Columbus?

Phoenicians discovered America 2000 yrs before Columbus? | History | Scoop.it
Columbus, credited with the discovery of Americas, may not have been the first to set foot on the continent, says a British explorer, claiming that Phoenicians

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