History and Geography (secondes)
32 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Map - Half the world's population live in six countries

Map - Half the world's population live in six countries | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

As of this month, the world’s population is now 7.2 billion, according to the United Nations, which celebrates World Population Day today. Interestingly, half of the people around the globe (3.6 billion) live in just six countries: China, India, the U.S., Indonesia, Brazil and Pakistan.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Map - Global Indicators Database

Map - Global Indicators Database | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

Explore our database to see how public views on the current state of the world and important issues of the day vary around the globe.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis

The Last Drop: America's Breadbasket Faces Dire Water Crisis | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This story is one in a series on a crisis in America's Breadbasket –the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer and its effects on a region that hel...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Linda Denty's curator insight, July 24, 2014 6:46 PM

Could this happen in Australia also?

Jamie Strickland's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:46 AM

Thanks to my good friend, Seth Dixon for the original scoop.  There had been quite a bit of news reporting on the drought in central California this year, but this midwestern region has been experiencing water stress for years with little national attention.  I plan to use this article in both an upcoming presentation as well as an example when I teach "Tragedy of the Commons" in my Environmental Dilemma class.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:32 PM

Good to compare to how we use water resources in Australia

Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from GEP Global Health and Human Development Resources for the Classroom
Scoop.it!

Human Development Reports | United Nations Development Programme

Human Development Reports | United Nations Development Programme | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

Via Global Education Project, Victoria
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Poop Stories

Poop Stories | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:49 PM

Often when people are faced with a tragic fact they instantly attempt to shut it out because it makes them uncomfortable. In the same way Americans can walk past five homeless people a day and not bat and eye...its easier. Using comedy to address a dire situation such as India's sanitation standards, is an ingenious way to get people to actually listen

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 30, 5:17 PM
This page tackles the problem of the lack of toilets in India. There are many comedians poking fun at the serious issues, which is not uncommon for comedians. Unfortunately these are serious issues, people are dying, especially children. 24% of girls drop out of school due to lack of proper toilets. Hopefully these comedians bring more light to the issue so it can begin to be addressed more seriously. 
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:52 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Processes and Patterns

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:45 PM

This femicide is extremely disappointing.  Genocide is expected in third world, war torn countries.  The fact that it's 2014 and female babies are murdered for being girls, and parents are scared for their  children's lives, show how much power the government has over the people's lives. It is sad to think the government has the power to dictate how many children families can have and what gender.  On the flip side, these are countries that are extremely overpopulated.  The one child policy in China is what China is currently using (along with this femicide) as population control.  This is an important issue because there needs to be some sort of population control, but to what extent? This is taking away someone's basic human right - to procreate. Parents do not have control over what gender they produce and if they produce a female, their child may be taken and murdered from them. The state takes away what you created, your offspring and there is nothing they can do about it. 

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 30, 5:24 PM
This video addresses the problems with having a girl versus having a boy baby. It talks about families killing babies if they are girls, aborting them, all so they can go on to have a son. According to the video 200 million girls are missing throughout the world. Many of these missing girls are daughters that were aborted or killed so their families could go onto have a son. 
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Twin Cities

"Landsat has seen a lot in its day. In one spot of desert, where the Rio Grande marks the border between the United States and Mexico, the satellite program captured hundreds of images of fields turning green with the season, new developments expanding from El Paso, Texas, and clouds moving over the neighboring mountains."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 13, 2013 8:06 AM

Since I have family on both sides of this line, I've always be fascinated by the U.S.-Mexico border as a cultural, political and economic phenomenon.  Ciudad Juárez/El Paso are examples of 'twin cities' that form along the border and in many ways are one metropolitan area that has been brought together by the interactions available at the border; at the same time this regions is highly divided by spatial governance policies.  Click here to download high resolution images El Paso/Ciudad Juárez

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 11:09 PM

Seeing both U.S and Mexican land going from mostly desert to significant expansion throughout the years is amazing. It shows that while they are two different countries, they both developed simultaneously together, much like the videos title suggests, as 'Twin Cities'

Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Climate Change at it's most basic

http://www.HowGlobalWarmingWorks.org University of California

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Expert's comment, December 18, 2013 7:27 PM
hmm.
imran bharti's curator insight, December 18, 2013 11:46 PM

good

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:17 AM

This video shoes us how climate change works in the most basic understanding. The video shows how global warming works and what exactly it does. It also shows how the climate changes effect the earth and the importance of understanding the  climate.

Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Geography & Current Events
Scoop.it!

Tribal Peoples' Contributions to Humanity

Tribal Peoples' Contributions to Humanity | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it
Today we're thankful for tribal peoples' contributions to the world. Please retweet if you agree! http://t.co/QzONIT42W5

Via Mr. David Burton
more...
Benny Haoxiang Liang's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:24 PM

So how does .1% of the population of the world manage to be the origin for 16% of the worlds languages?  I believe the absence of communications between other peoples is the cause of this.  And without the trade relationships associated with the lack of communications, people become much more likely to sustain themselves by native plants, instead of the above mentioned mass produced 12 plants that the world relies on.  It is a pity though, that with the modern methods of production, that natural forested lands that were the birthplaces of the discoveries of aspirin and rubber, are now being replaced by roads and cornfields.

Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Transport in European cities

Transport in European cities | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Global modern-day slavery

Global modern-day slavery | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

Almost half the world’s estimated 30 million slaves (defined as persons denied of freedom and exploited for profit or sex) are in India, according to a global index released last week.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Metals for a low-carbon society

Metals for a low-carbon society | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

Renewable energy requires infrastructures built with metals whose extraction requires more and more energy. ... For an equivalent installed capacity, solar and wind facilities require up to 15 times more concrete, 90 times more aluminium, and 50 times more iron, copper and glass than fossil fuels or nuclear energy.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Energy cost in Europe

Energy cost in Europe | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

EU energy prices will rise unless European governments stick to strict guidelines on when subsidies are justified. Today’s graphic shows the electricity and gas prices for household and industrial users since the first half of 2011 in select European countries.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

"The global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) is an international measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. It complements traditional income-based poverty measures by capturing the severe deprivations that each person faces at the same time with respect to education, health and living standards."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 4:54 PM

"Access"--North America Unit

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:13 PM

The MPI was developed out of a desire to fill some of the gaps in the HDI's applicability and utility.  Allow me to quote the editor of one the NCGE's journals, the Geography Teacher, on the usefulness of the MPI website for classroom use: "With the infographics, maps, graphs, country briefings, and case studies, you have a ready-made lesson activities to demonstrate patterns of fertility, mortality, and health for a population unit, and access to health care, education, utilities, and sanitation for an Industrialization and Economic Development Unit. Connections can also be made to malnutrition and water, as well as to key concepts such as pattern and scale, to key geographical skills such as how to use and think about maps and geospatial data, and to the use of online maps and online data."  Also, this article from the World Bank also give a run-down on the key findings of the MPI in 2014. 

 

Tags: statisticspopulation, development, unit 2 population, unit 6 industry.

Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Map - The children killed in the current Gaza strip conflict

Map - The children killed in the current Gaza strip conflict | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it
Graphic: More children than Palestinian fighters are being killed in the offensive on Gaza, according to the UN. The name, age, sex and location of 132 of the 155 Palestinian children killed have been collected by the Al Mezan Centre for Human Rights

Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

Casey Lysdale's curator insight, November 28, 2016 12:43 PM
Could subsistence in megacities becoming a bigger threat than sea level rise? The population rise caused an increase in groundwater extraction practices which made the ground sink over six feet in Indonesia's largest city. The solution is to stop pumping groundwater and seek alternative forms of obtaining drinking water. Effects of land subsistence combined with rising sea levels can leave many coastal cities into project Atlantis. 
 
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Graph - The Frightening Growth of Suburban Slums

Graph - The Frightening Growth of Suburban Slums | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

Americans still tend to think about poverty as an inner-city problem. But some time around the dotcom bust and 2001 recession, the number of poor people living in the suburbs actually outstripped the total residing in cities. So why is suburban poverty often treated as out of sight, out of mind?

 

One reason may be that it’s more diffuse. In urban areas, the poor are often packed into predominantly low-income neighborhoods. In the 'burbs, they’re generally scattered through more economically diverse communities. In other words, the U.S. suburbs are home to lots of impoverished people, but they’re not home to lots of slums.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from GEP Global Health and Human Development Resources for the Classroom
Scoop.it!

The Millennium Development Goals Report 2014 | UNDP

The Millennium Development Goals Report 2014 | UNDP | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it
With the deadline for the MDGs on the horizon, progress can be reported in most areas, the report says. Several important targets have or will be met by 2015, assuming continued commitment by national governments, the international community, civil society and the private sector.

Via Global Education Project, Victoria
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both

Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

"For city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life.There are over 7 billion people on the planet, a massive number that paints an image of human life sprawling densely over the planet...humans are unevenly distributed across the planet, leaving some areas that are densely populated and others that are largely void of life."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 10:48 PM

As you review the resource map noting the locations of the emptiest and most crowded places on Earth, take note on where these places are located.  What do you see?  Why do you think they are crowded or uninhabitable?  What are your thoughts?  What amazed you?

Samantha Tovias's curator insight, January 13, 2014 2:39 AM

What this article states is that in some places of the world it's crowded with a lot of people and there's not much space. People struggle to find places to live without being really close to ones neighbor. They also have to struggle over  job opportunities. Due to this they struggle with poverty and the places they are at aren't so clean. This is because people make a lot of trash and where there's many people there is a lot of trash. Therefore it's not so sanitary and they have to deal with lack of space and sanitation.

 

On the other hand, in some places of the world, there is much space to be inhabited by humans. But it's basically free land because no one lives there and there's no building occupying it. But this land could be used for many things such as building neighbor hoods, buildings, and business. Sometimes it's good to have that land free from everything because that way when there's really a reason to use it we can just go back to it with no worrys. Just as long as we don't use up too much land it should be fine. We also need to know how to control how much nature we use up. Because its also not healthy to have a lot of pollution with no trees to cleanse our oxygen. That's a hazardous precaution us humans should take.

Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:18 PM

Well some places, such as deserts, are really hot, dry, barren and devoid of life; mostly because it's impossible to build anything on such soft ground. While places such as Texas has really dry and hard ground perfect for building foundations.  Then there's the amount of resources in that area, I.e. Water, food, tree, etc.,  and many other factors that contradict if it's inhabitable.

Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 2014 10:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 2014 6:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 2014 8:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 4:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.

Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Urbanization in 12 panels

Urbanization in 12 panels | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

India's mobile market

India's mobile market | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

India is the world’s second biggest mobile phone market by number of users. Today’s graphic shows the number of subscribers and which carriers control the market share.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
Mathijs Booden's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:55 AM

The number of subscribers remained more or less steady since 2011, following rapid growth in the years before. The population continued to grow, so the percentage of subscribers must have declined. Interesting.

Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

UK nuclear power plants

UK nuclear power plants | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

Britain signed a deal with France's EFT on Monday to build the first new European nuclear plant since the Fukushima disaster.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fabienne Chaperon from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Global map provides new insights into land use

Global map provides new insights into land use | History and Geography  (secondes) | Scoop.it

In order to assess the global impacts of land use on the environment and help provide appropriate countermeasures, a group of researchers under the leadership of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) has created a new world map of land use systems. Based on various indicators of land-use intensity, climate, environmental and socio-economic conditions, they identified twelve global patterns called land system archetypes.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.