History and Geography (terminales)
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Les Etats-Unis, thalassokrator mais pas thalassocratie (Diploweb)

Les Etats-Unis, thalassokrator mais pas thalassocratie (Diploweb) | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it

BIEN qu’imaginé il y a 2000 ans par Strabon, le terme de thalassokrator(« maître de la mer ») semble taillé sur mesure pour décrire la position des Etats-Unis depuis 70 ans. La carte jointe, extraite de Qui tient la mer tient le monde ; géopolitique des océans (coll. Major, PUF, 2012), montre qu’au-delà de leur domination matérielle (une dizaine de porte-avions à propulsion nucléaire, le double de navires d’assaut, une cinquantaine de SNA…) et technologique (monopole des catapultes pour porte-avions, missiles de croisière d’une portée de 2500 km), c’est leur capacité à entretenir sur tous les océans une permanence à la mer, indispensable au contrôle des flux stratégiques, et à pouvoir intervenir avec un faible délai en n’importe quel point critique, qui fait leur force. Cette double capacité tient au réseau de bases qu’ils entretiennent sur leurs propres territoires (dans le Pacifique, où l’US Navy prévoit de déployer 60 % de ses unités à la fin de la décennie, confirmant le basculement du centre de gravité mondiale) ou chez leurs alliés ; ces bases permettent le prépositionnement d’unités d’intervention interarmées et leur ravitaillement, mais aussi, pour les plus importantes d’entre elles, l’entretien et la réparation des navires qui n’ont donc pas besoin de retourner aux Etats-Unis régulièrement. [...]


Via Penzer_Lochrist, Bénédicte TRATNJEK
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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

Via Seth Dixon, darioingiusto
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Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 2015 4:19 PM

I found it quite interesting to see that most of the world in 1990 had manufacturing jobs because working at factories was the only job that was accessible with not many health care service oppurtunities. While in 2013 health care takes up most of North America, when you might expect the majority of North America to be made up of retail trade because so many malls and building are being constructed throughout the world. One positive part of this map is that job opportunities were even there in the first place, without working the economy will go downhill.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 2015 6:49 PM

It's amazing to see how priorities have shifted over time.  Also, this is a great display of how technology has taken over what once was human labor.  

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:43 PM

Shifting economies.


This interactive map is a powerful way to visually display the changes in the economic geography of the United States.  It is especially useful when discussing the transition of an economy from the secondary sector to tertiary sector.  

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An overview of the crisis in Gaza

An overview of the crisis in Gaza | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
Almost a month after Israel launched Operation Protective Edge, life in the Palestinian territory is becoming increasingly difficult. The United Nations estimates that almost a quarter of Gaza's 1.7 million residents have been displaced by the fighting, and all residents are struggling with power outages and a lack of basic supplies.

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darioingiusto's curator insight, August 10, 2014 11:59 AM

The Washington Post - #Infographic about crisis in #Gaza

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Infographic - The BRICS economies

Infographic - The BRICS economies | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it

The leaders of the BRICS economies are expected to sign a deal that creates a $100 billion bank and a reserves fund to challenge Western dominance over global finance.


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The Toll in Gaza and Israel, Day by Day

The Toll in Gaza and Israel, Day by Day | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
The daily tally of rocket attacks, airstrikes and deaths in the conflict between Israel and Hamas.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 19, 2014 2:26 PM

As the violent nature of the Israeli Palestinian conflict has escalated, this NY Times article monitors the major points of the last few weeks.  The possibility of 'Peace in the Middle East' feels so remote, and this Onion article parodies the difficulties of actually achieving this.  On a personal note, Chad Emmett taught the "Geography of the Middle East" course while I was at BYU and I've always appreciated his perspective; here are his thoughts on recent events.  


Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.

Utah Geographical Alliance's curator insight, July 28, 2014 3:17 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

As the violent nature of the Israeli Palestinian conflict has escalated, this NY Times article monitors the major points of the last few weeks.  The possibility of 'Peace in the Middle East' feels so remote, and this Onion article parodies the difficulties of actually achieving this.  On a personal note, Chad Emmett taught the "Geography of the Middle East" course while I was at BYU and I've always appreciated his perspective; here are his thoughts on recent events.  


TagsIsraelPalestineconflictpoliticalborders.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:57 PM

APHG-U3 & U4

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Nicaragua unveils major canal route

Nicaragua unveils major canal route | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it

"The Nicaraguan government and the company behind plans to build a canal linking the Atlantic and the Pacific Ocean have settled on a route."


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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:16 PM

This article is quite interesting... It seems as though this new canal might be good just because it will be much bigger than the current Panama Canal, allowing tankers and other large ships that cannot traverse the Panama Canal to be able to get from the Atlantic to the Pacific or vise versa. The only thing that does not sound so good about it is the fact that it may cut through Lake Nicaragua, which is the largest source of fresh water. On top of that, it claims it will not rival the Panama Canal, but to me it seems as if it would because ships would not have to travel as far south as they do now to get to the Panama Canal. Another good feature about this canal though is the canal might be able to lift Nicaragua out of Poverty and formal employment will increase because of the Canal. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:35 PM

Having a new canal that is going through the area of Nicaragua seems to be a Nicaragua and China fighting for rights to get through Central America with the US and Panama. If this were approved it could boost economic taxes between the two nations as they would be presumably argue over who is going to have the cheaper taxes. Not sure if this is a good idea or a bad one.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:15 AM

A Chinese firm (HKND) is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  I've been following this issue as I prepared to co-author an article  for Maps 101 with Julie Dixon and it is clearly a major environmental issue.  However, this issue is much more geographic than just the angle; China and Nicaragua are vying for greater control and access to the shipping lanes that dominate the global economy and international trade.  This shows that they are each attempting to bolster their regional and international impact compared to their rivals (the United States for China and Panama for Nicaragua).   


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Infographic - Ebola outbreaks

Infographic - Ebola outbreaks | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it

Ebola is believed to have killed 672 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone since the outbreak began in February, according to the World Health Organization. The doctor leading Sierra Leone’s fight against the worst Ebola outbreak on record died from the virus on Tuesday.


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Do you know Africa?

Do you know Africa? | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it

Many of Africa’s leaders will be in town next week attending a White House summit. The continent’s land is shared among 49 countries — many of which rarely make U.S. headlines. How familiar are you with Africa’s geography?


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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 5:21 PM

I love interactive maps like this.  These are the best way to learn where things are in the world geographically.  Africa is the toughest, for myself, continent in the world to be able to locate and identify where certain countries are.  This is in part because Africa has so many countries and also Africa is a part of the world that is not often taught in school, therefore you have limited thoughts and ideas about these types of areas.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 22, 2015 1:54 PM

I have always been fascinated with Africa and its history. Through its history one can understand why Africa is the way it is today. Its a shame that Africa does not have more of a focus in the Public School Curriculum. Its played a huge part in developing western civilization, whether it be in ancient Alexandria providing grain for the Roman Republic or the coltan extracted through inhumane means in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Africa is a continent that has been raped and torn in a repetitive manor under a variety of foul experiences brought upon by western countries. These are the same western countries that are held of high interest and regards in subject manor instituted in the Public School System. Africa has also been apart of amazing developments of human civilization, for example the Trans Saharan Trade Route which linked Kingdoms such as Ancient Ghana to dynasties far in the Middle East. It is also the birthplace of man (no big deal). In either case there needs to be a stronger push on teaching/molding "Africa" (yes, I know... broad) into the curriculum. It is important in both understanding the history of the world, specifically western civilization and how it coined itself  “civilized.” Through introducing basic aspects, history, and dilemmas (both old and modern) it could inspire more interest and an expansion of knowledge from student to student. School is and will most likely continue to be Euro-centric and have large flares of Americana and other “themes” of North America. 

Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 24, 5:31 PM
This interactive map quizzes you on the location of the states of Africa and it shows the percentage of how many people found certain countries. South Africa, Madagascar and other more recognizable countries had higher percentages, but it is still a difficult quiz as many people do not know the geography of Africa. 
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Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


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wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stran smith's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:27 AM

CULTURAL UNIT

This amazing youtube video is something we watched in class, and is such a great animation. This video charts hundreds of years of cultural diffusion in a mere five minutes. You can see empires rise and crumple, people die and become born, as well as many other significant dates. This applies to the diffusion patterns of culture, because we can see where people and cultures are going throughout the centuries. 

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Chart of the Week: Coffee and tea around the world

Chart of the Week: Coffee and tea around the world | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
Worldwide tea is far more popular than coffee, but preferences for one beverage over the other fall into distinct geographic patterns. (The #Geography of Hot Drinks RT @conradhackett: Do you belong in coffee world or tea world?
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Egypt court jails activists over protests - Aljazeera.com

Egypt court jails activists over protests - Aljazeera.com | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
Aljazeera.com Egypt court jails activists over protests Aljazeera.com Africa · Americas · Asia-Pacific · Central & South Asia · Europe · Middle East · Inside Story · Witness · Listening Post · People & Power · 101 East · The Stream · More · Focus ·...
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Syrian refugee crisis map

Syrian refugee crisis map | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
More than 2 1/2 years of violence has ravaged Syria. About 40 percent of its people have been displaced, including millions who have fled the country.

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Rigby killers had history of Islamic extremism

Rigby killers had history of Islamic extremism | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
New footage has emerged that shows one of Lee Rigby’s killers speaking at a protest with a known radical preacher.

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38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.

Via Seth Dixon
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World Trade 2012

World Trade 2012 | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
A data visualisation of trade in excess of $1 billion in 2012

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darioingiusto's curator insight, August 10, 2014 6:01 AM
WORLD TRADE DATA VISUALISATION made with D3.js. Data by World Bank
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Map - Public confidence in Latin America's justice system

Map - Public confidence in Latin America's justice system | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it

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Infographic - Initial contributions to the BRICS' development bank

Infographic - Initial contributions to the BRICS' development bank | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it

Leaders of the BRICS emerging market nations launched a development bank and a currency reserve pool in their first concrete steps toward reshaping the Western-dominated international financial system.


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What is a part of the United States?


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:54 PM

APHG-U4

CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, August 17, 2014 5:28 PM

Use in Political Geo unit, or for Canada and US region

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 11:09 PM

I honestly feel like we are never taught about these areas ever in US schools. We are always drilled about the 50 states and that's it. I would be interested in learning the history behind why this is still the case and what is keeping our government from considering them part of the states. The fact that they wont even consider American Samoa's citizens is a disgrace.

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Infographic - Latin America economic growth expectations fall

Infographic - Latin America economic growth expectations fall | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it

Analysts polled in July are less optimistic about the growth prospects in Latin America than they were three months earlier.


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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.

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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

Via Seth Dixon
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Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 2015 4:19 PM

I found it quite interesting to see that most of the world in 1990 had manufacturing jobs because working at factories was the only job that was accessible with not many health care service oppurtunities. While in 2013 health care takes up most of North America, when you might expect the majority of North America to be made up of retail trade because so many malls and building are being constructed throughout the world. One positive part of this map is that job opportunities were even there in the first place, without working the economy will go downhill.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 2015 6:49 PM

It's amazing to see how priorities have shifted over time.  Also, this is a great display of how technology has taken over what once was human labor.  

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:43 PM

Shifting economies.


This interactive map is a powerful way to visually display the changes in the economic geography of the United States.  It is especially useful when discussing the transition of an economy from the secondary sector to tertiary sector.  

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Map - Island of safety becomes a death trap

Map - Island of safety becomes a death trap | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it

Between 10,000 and 40,000 ethnic Yazidis are trapped in the Sinjar Mountains after fleeing attacks by fighter from the Islamic State (IS). The 4,400-foot-high Sinjar range is venerated by the Yazidis.


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Dubai's Arabtec Starts Unit to Develop Middle East Real Estate - Bloomberg

Dubai's Arabtec Starts Unit to Develop Middle East Real Estate Bloomberg Arabtec Real Estate Development Company will start building new homes in Abu Dhabi and Dubai, with plans to expand into other countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council and the...
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Refuge: 18 stories from the Syrian Exodus

Refuge: 18 stories from the Syrian Exodus | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
A child broken. Homes destroyed. Millions of lives upended. Syria's refugee crisis is altering the Middle East.

Via Middle East Prospects Forum
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A failed revolution: Why Israel’s next social protest will be a violent one

A failed revolution: Why Israel’s next social protest will be a violent one | History and Geography (terminales) | Scoop.it
The next social protest will be violent because the demand will no longer be for change but for a revolution – and revolutions are violent by nature.

Via Middle East Prospects Forum
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