Historical Thinking
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These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today

These Interactive Maps Compare 19th Century American Cities to Today | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it

" The Smithsonian Magazine recently dipped into David Rumsey's collection of over 150,000 maps to find some of the best representations of American cities over the past couple hundred years. With some simple programming, they were able to overlay images of vintage maps of some major cities onto satellite images from today. The results are fascinating."


Via Seth Dixon, Allison Zmuda
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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, January 6, 2016 5:02 PM

Entre art et géographie...

Lindsay Hoyt's curator insight, June 26, 2017 11:31 PM

Helps connects the past to the present.

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, January 9, 10:06 AM

Très original ! Site en anglais

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Search Results: "jerusalem" - Prints & Photogra...

Search Results: "jerusalem" - Prints & Photogra... | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
“The Prints and Photographs Online Catalog (PPOC) contains catalog records and digital images representing a rich cross-section of still pictures held by the Prints & Photographs ...” (Search Results: "jerusalem" - Prints & Photographs Online ...
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The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum

The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good, Tom Hood
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wanderingsalsero's curator insight, October 20, 2013 8:09 PM

Makes sense to me.

Julie Groom's curator insight, October 23, 2013 4:48 AM

Curating - how to manage it. And curation experts already exist - they're called Librarians!

John Thomas's curator insight, February 9, 2014 12:29 PM
The Five Laws of The Content Curation Economy by Steve Rosenbaum
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Timelines for Teachers: Historical Primary Sources from the Library of Congress by Era

Timelines for Teachers: Historical Primary Sources from the Library of Congress by Era | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
Timelines are timesavers for busy teachers, and the Teaching with the Library of Congress blog has highlighted some. The Teachers page offers even more, and the busy start of school seems like an auspicious time to point out a few.

Via David McMullen
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Social Studies Chat (#sschat) Archive

2013 8-18-13 Library of Congress Resources 8-11-13 First Week of School 7-29-13 Google's 20% in the Classroom 7-15-13 Ele… (RT @mseideman: Missed #sschat tonight on the Library of Congress Check out the Social Studies Chat Archive
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The First Long-Distance Telegraph Message, Sent This Day in 1844: 'What Hath God Wrought?' | The Atlantic

The First Long-Distance Telegraph Message, Sent This Day in 1844: 'What Hath God Wrought?' | The Atlantic | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it

All your Internet can be traced back to this moment of history with the launch of the Victorian Internet.

 

This strip of paper records the first ever message sent by telegraph, a feat that occurred on this day, May 24th, in 1844. Standing in the chamber of the Supreme Court, Samuel B. Morse sent a 19-letter message to his assistant Albert Vail in Baltimore, who transmitted the message back. Members of Congress watched the demonstration with fascination much like their countrymen did in future demonstrations. 

 

The piece of paper you see above records three things: a note Morse appended to the top detailing its importance, the actual Morse code marks, and their translation into letters at the bottom.

 

In most accounts, like the one maintained by the Senate (which used to house the Supreme Court chamber), the words Morse sent get short thrift: "A young woman provided the first message he sent: 'What hath God wrought.'" 

 

But the telegraph's long-distance application marks the beginning of a new era of communication, in which information can travel faster than any human by any means of conveyance. If you run the videos of the deployments of all the telephone and Internet and social networks around the world in reverse, they'd all wither and contract until there were only two points on the electric-information network: that Supreme Court chamber and the Mount Clair railway depot in Baltimore.

 

In light of all that, the words of Morse's friend's daughter, Annie Ellsworth, take on more meaning than she probably anticipated: What hath God wrought, indeed.


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Teacher Resources | Library of Congress

Teacher Resources | Library of Congress | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching.

Via Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, May 27, 2013 11:08 PM

Using the Library of Congress Teacher Resources allows teachers to search classroom materials by Common Core Standards: grade level, discipline (ELA or Social Studies). Searches return lesson disaggregated by specfic substrand category and individual grade-level standard (for instance, key ideas & details or craft & structure). Lesson plans as well as materials are made available. A winner!! 

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Boston 1775: The “Too Obscene” Verses of “Yankee Doodle”

Boston 1775: The “Too Obscene” Verses of “Yankee Doodle” | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
RT @Boston1775: Two verses of "Yankee Doodle" that the US Library of Congress deemed "obscene" in 1909: http://t.co/UR3X8o41Qs @DrSamForman
Jennie Munson's insight:

Yankee Doodle has two MORE verses! Who knew?

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Under His Hat: Discovering Lincoln's Story from Primary Sources

Under His Hat: Discovering Lincoln's Story from Primary Sources | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it

"Under His Hat is the home of the Lincoln Collection Digitization Project, a thematic online-education resource about the United States' 16th President, Abraham Lincoln...[The site] uses primary source materials from the more than 52,000 Abraham Lincoln and Lincoln-era artifacts and documents known as the Lincoln Collection. These primary source materials are presented in thematic groupings to bring Lincoln's history to life for a global audience."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 8, 2013 11:02 PM

If your class will be studying Abraham Lincoln check out this great resource that provides primary source materials using the themes listed below.

* Paying the Price

* Mr. Lincoln's Desk

* Lincoln and the Frontier

* Lincoln and the War Part 1

* Lincoln and the War Part 2

* Iconic Lincoln

* Lincoln the Politician

* Personal Lincoln

The resources include hands-on activities, critical thinking activities, references and more. Each item has a Suggested Classroom Activities page that may be downloades and some of the items include a video presentation and/or a podcast. 

 

Michele Alvarez's curator insight, June 10, 2013 3:22 PM

This will be a great resource to go with "Chasing Lincoln's Killer" by James L. Swanson and the ELA6 CCSS :) Thanks for sharing!

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Feature Article - Historical Thinking, Winter 2010- Teaching with Primary Sources | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress

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The basic tenants of "Thinking Like a Historian" by Sam Wineburg

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Inquiry from the Library of Congress | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress

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Teaching With the Library of Congress - Best Colleges Online

Teaching With the Library of Congress - Best Colleges Online | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
Discover how the Library of Congress' vast resources — both print and digital — can help educators boost their lesson plans.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 10, 2013 10:47 PM

The Library of Congress has amazing resources, and this infographic provides an overview of what is available!

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How Reframing A Problem Unlocks Innovation - Co.Design

How Reframing A Problem Unlocks Innovation - Co.Design | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
Co.Design How Reframing A Problem Unlocks Innovation Co.Design In the new “reading like a historian” project, led by Abby Reisman and Sam Wineburg, the students get to study the information from all different points of view and come up with their...
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Using History to Invigorate Common-Core Lessons

Using History to Invigorate Common-Core Lessons | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
Teachers should draw on historical texts to give life to the literacy objectives of the common-core standards, Stanford University's Sam Wineburg writes.
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Virtual Reference Shelf - Ask a Librarian (Library of Congress)

Ask a librarian: An online reference service from the Library of Congress that allows researchers to submit reference questions to Library of Congress reading rooms and receive expert research assistance (within 5 business days.) (SITE OF THE DAY:...
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Stuart Firestein - The Pursuit of Ignorance

What does real scientific work look like? As neuroscientist Stuart Firestein jokes: It looks a lot less like the scientific method and a lot more like "farting around … in the dark." In this witty talk, Firestein gets to the heart of science as it is really practiced and suggests that we should value what we don’t know -- or “high-quality ignorance” -- just as much as what we know.

 

Stuart Firestein teaches students and “citizen scientists” that ignorance is far more important to discovery than knowledge.


Via Stephen Lippa
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Stephen Lippa's comment, November 21, 2013 8:12 AM
Watched this TED again. Such incredible insights about the purpose of science education is not knowledge but to produce more questions.
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The Way of Improvement Leads Home: Sam Wineburg on ...

The Way of Improvement Leads Home: Sam Wineburg on ... | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
Sam Wineburg made his bones in the field of education by writing seminal articles and books on historical thinking. His most famous book, Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts, has received a lot of attention here at ...
Jennie Munson's insight:

"I no longer believe that the scholarly enterprise of education has much to do with educational betterment. I no longer believe that when I publish articles in journals with minuscule circulations I am contributing to the field—if by “field” we mean the thousands of well-meaning individuals who go to work each day in places called schools.- Sam Wineburg. #educhat

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Welcome Back to Teaching with the Library of Congress Blog | Teaching with the Library of Congress

Welcome Back to Teaching with the Library of Congress Blog | Teaching with the Library of Congress | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
Welcome Back to Teaching with the Library of Congress Blog. A blog post at "Teaching with the Library of Congress" on 2013-08-22.
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The Teacher's Guide To The Library Of Congress ...

The Teacher's Guide To The Library Of Congress ... | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
We've discussed the benefits of the U.S. Library of Congress many times on Edudemic. Usually we focus on some particular parts of the vast amount of resources or instead offer a more overall picture of what it offers.
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15 Awesome Webcasts for Librarians from The Library of Congress ...

15 Awesome Webcasts for Librarians from The Library of Congress ... | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
The Library of Congress has published a great number of webcasts from experts, educators, authors and professionals discussing a wide variety of subjects, many of which may be of particular interest to fellow librarians.
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"The Poet and the Poem" Audio Podcasts, Part 2: Webcasts and Podcasts (The Poetry and Literature Center at the Library of Congress)

"The Poet and the Poem" Audio Podcasts, Part 2: Webcasts and Podcasts (The Poetry and Literature Center at the Library of Congress) | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
"The Poet and the Poem" Audio Podcasts, Part 2: Webcasts and Podcasts from the Poetry and Literature Center at the Library of Congress.
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Ordering the Heavens: A Visual History of Mapping the Universe

Ordering the Heavens: A Visual History of Mapping the Universe | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
From Copernicus to Ancient Korea, or what the Chinese concept of change has to do with Aztec astrology.
Jennie Munson's insight:

"Gathered here is a curated selection of images from the exhibition, alongside the original caption text accompanying them."

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Historical Thinking Matters: Why Historical Thinking Matters

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Be sure to download the video on historical thinking. 

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Diana Laufenberg on Teaching History Thematically | Teachinghistory.org

Diana Laufenberg on Teaching History Thematically | Teachinghistory.org | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it

By Diana Laufenberg

 

 

"After a number of years of teaching history chronologically, I made the curricular decision to shift to a thematic approach. I am privileged to work in schools that allow me the flexibility to make these types of classroom decisions.

 

My rationale for this change was grounded in a number of gut-check teacher experiences but also in the writings of Sam Wineburg, Eric Foner, David Perkins, and James Loewen. America has never excelled at knowing its own past. As I watched the school days pass, I observed that students participated and engaged, but still did not meaningfully retain the information. Something had to give. I ditched chronological teaching."


Via Diana Laufenberg, Jim Lerman
Jennie Munson's insight:

"If we teach history every year in school, why do the students retain so little of the information?"

 
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Classroom Materials | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress

Classroom Materials | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress | Historical Thinking | Scoop.it
Library of Congress resources and classroom materials for teachers.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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