Higher Education and academic research
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Higher education and academic/non-profit research in the world
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U.S. report calls for research integrity board

U.S. report calls for research integrity board | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Independent body would help foster good behavior and better investigations


The U.S. research community needs to do a better job of both investigating misconduct allegations and promoting ethical conduct—or the government might act unilaterally in ways that scientists won’t like. (...) - Science, by Jeffrey Mervis, April 11 2017

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Science academies blast US government’s planned research-ethics reforms

Science academies blast US government’s planned research-ethics reforms | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Panel recommends scrapping proposed changes to 'Common Rule' on human-subjects research.

The US government’s proposed overhaul of regulations that govern research with human subjects is flawed and should be withdrawn, an independent advisory panel said today. (...) - Nature, by Sara Reardon, 29 June 2016

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Researchers seek ethical guidelines for higher ed studies, but privacy concerns remain unsettled @insidehighered

Researchers seek ethical guidelines for higher ed studies, but privacy concerns remain unsettled @insidehighered | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Unanswered Questions

Almost 40 years ago, a commission met to establish ethical guidelines governing research with human subjects. Earlier this month, a similar group met to discuss a different kind of guinea pig: the online learner.

The Asilomar Convention for Learning Research in Higher Education, a gathering of faculty members, researchers and legal scholars, on Monday produced a two-page report affirming that higher education research should be guided by transparent data collection processes, shared results and respect for the learner. (...) - by Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed, June 23, 2014

 

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U.K. Looks to Scrap Confidentiality Rules for Animal Research

U.K. Looks to Scrap Confidentiality Rules for Animal Research | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Plan includes safeguards to protect scientists and institutions.

The United Kingdom has proposed lifting outdated confidentiality rules that ban the release of information about animal research.

Under Section 24 of the 1986 Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act, the Home Office cannot release any information about animal research carried out in the country. This includes, for example, information about people or places applying for animal testing licenses and inspection visit reports. But these rules are now “out of step with [government] policy on openness and transparency,” said Home Office Minister Norman Baker in a public consultation launched yesterday. (...) - by

Tania Rabesandratana, Science, Friday, May 2, 2014
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From fraudsters to fudgers: research integrity is on trial

From fraudsters to fudgers: research integrity is on trial | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Bad behaviour is omnipresent in science. It encompasses everything from outright scientific fraud, such as falsifying data, to other misconducts like cherry-picking data, favourable-looking images and graphs, and drawing conclusions that are not backed up by the actual facts. Overall, it matters more serious than keeping a sloppy lab notebook that no-one else can follow. This raises the deeper question: what drives scientists to behave in such a way? Typically considered quite clever people, why would a researcher behave in a way when, theoretically, one of the backbones of science – results’ replicability – is bound to get you in the end? And that is just one of the watchmen: university colleagues and journal editors must be duped too.(...) - Euroscientist, April 30th, 2014

 

 

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What if your research is used to draw conclusions you never intended?

What if your research is used to draw conclusions you never intended? | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Peter McPhee is unconvinced by a forensic analysis of the French revolutionary Maximilien Robespierre that cites his own research. (...) - by Peter McPhee, The Guardian, 11 February 2014

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Research ethics: 3 ways to blow the whistle

Research ethics: 3 ways to blow the whistle | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Reporting suspicions of scientific fraud is rarely easy, but some paths are more effective than others. (...) - by Ed Yong, Heidi Ledford, Richard Van Noorden, Nature , 27 November 2013

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Diederik Stapel’s Audacious Academic Fraud

Diederik Stapel’s Audacious Academic Fraud | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Diederik Stapel, a Dutch social psychologist, perpetrated an audacious academic fraud by making up studies that told the world what it wanted to hear about human nature. (...) -By YUDHIJIT BHATTACHARJEE, The New York Times, April 26, 2013

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Top UK geneticist faces new inquiry over claims of research misconduct

Top UK geneticist faces new inquiry over claims of research misconduct | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Master of Birkbeck, University of London, Prof David Latchman to be investigated despite being cleared by similar inquiry last year (...) - The Guardian, by Ian Sample, 3 January 2017

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Japan's researchers face increased ethics oversight

Funding approval will hinge on bolstering research integrity.

 

TOKYO—Scientists in Japan applying for government grants will soon be getting new mandatory reading material: a manual for promoting research integrity.

The manual, to be released by the end of the year, is being developed by the country’s three major funding agencies and the Science Council of Japan, the nation’s largest organization of researchers. (...) - by Dennis Normile, Science, 5 September 2014

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German Ethics Council: Government Should Regulate Dangerous Research

German Ethics Council: Government Should Regulate Dangerous Research | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Report recommends legal framework to deal with "dual use research of concern.

The German government should step in with legislation to regulate so-called dual use research of concern (DURC), the type of science that can benefit mankind but may be dangerous in the wrong hands, says a report issued today by the German Ethics Council. The government should set up a national committee to review DURC proposals in advance, says the report. In addition, the panel says action is needed to raise awareness about the issue, both at home and internationally. (...) - by Martin Enserink, ScienceInsider, May 7, 2014

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UK proposes greater transparency on animal research

UK proposes greater transparency on animal research | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Government seeks to ditch rule preventing release of laboratory information.

The government of the United Kingdom wants to jettison rules that prevent it releasing any confidential information it holds about animal research, as part of a continuing push towards openness about such work. (...) - Nature, by Daniel cressey, 01/05/2014

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Former U.S. Research Fraud Chief Speaks Out on Resignation, 'Frustrations'

Former U.S. Research Fraud Chief Speaks Out on Resignation, 'Frustrations' | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

David Wright's fiery resignation letter last month drew national attention.

Last month, David Wright, the director of the federal Office of Research Integrity (ORI), which keeps watch on fraud in federally funded biomedical research, quit in frustration after 2 years. His resignation letter was a scathing critique of what he called the “dysfunctional” bureaucracy at the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH). After it was obtained and published by ScienceInsider, it drew national attention to an office that often labors in obscurity. Wright, 68, has since returned to Michigan, where he is a professor emeritus at Michigan State University in East Lansing. He spoke with ScienceInsider earlier this week about his reasons for leaving. The interview has been edited for clarity and brevity. (...) - by Jocelyn Kaiser, Science, 4 April 2014

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Free speech under threat in UK universities

Free speech under threat in UK universities | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Letter: We believe that the suspensions at the University of Birmingham are evidence of the contempt for freedom of expression in the contemporary university.

Five University of Birmingham students were suspended following a national demonstration on campus on Wednesday 29 January (Online report, 30 January). An email from Dr Chris Twine, director of student services, was sent around the College of Social Sciences stating that the five students "have been suspended from study and barred from University premises with immediate effect" and are "not to be allowed access to any teaching or learning activities". (...) - The Guardian, 10 February, 2014

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Agents and the ethics of international higher education

Agents and the ethics of international higher education | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Global student mobility creates big business. Approximately three million students are studying abroad, contributing more than US$75 billion to the global economy.

There are multiple reasons for choosing to study abroad, among them a desire to increase employability in the home labour market, the inability to find relevant study opportunities at home, and the desire for migration. The motivations of countries and universities recruiting international students are equally complex and increasingly commercial. (...) - University World News, by

Philip G Altbach and Liz Reisberg, 14 September 2013 Issue No:287
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