Higher Education and academic research
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Higher Education and academic research
Higher education and academic/non-profit research in the world
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Poor citation practices are continuing to harm the humanities and social sciences.

Poor citation practices are continuing to harm the humanities and social sciences. | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Citation and referencing patterns are not trivial things but solid and important indications of the presence of primary academic virtues. Patrick Dunleavy looks at disciplinary differences and argues the poor citation practices in the humanities and social sciences are therefore not just harmful to academics, but to all who read their works or follow after them. To break past such attitudes requires a collective effort to get to a better understanding of the existing literatures on the myriad topics covered. (...) - Blog LSE 'Impact of Social Sciences', by Patrick Dunleavy, Sep 12 2016

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New study raises questions about global rankings of citations

New study raises questions about global rankings of citations | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

The possession by Saudi Arabia’s King Abdulaziz University of more highly cited researchers than almost any other university in the world raises questions about institutions’ ability to manipulate global rankings.

This is the view of two researchers who last week posted on the arXiv preprint server a paper that ranks universities by the number of highly cited researchers who list them as affiliations. (...) - By Paul Jump for Times Higher Education, @insidehighered, July 17, 2014

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Retraction ripple effect

Journal-initiated retractions can reduce the number of citations of the author's earlier publications, a study finds (S. F. Lu et al. Sci. Rep. 3, 3146; 2013). The authors analysed the effects of 667 retractions — mostly in the sciences and dating mainly from 2000 onwards — on citations of the author's earlier work. When a journal initiated the retraction, the number of annual citations of earlier papers fell by 6.9% on average. But author-initiated retractions had no such effect. The scientific community rewards honesty, says study co-author Ben Jones, an economist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Self-reporting indicates that “you really care about getting it right”, he says. (...) - Nature, 503, 429, 20 November 2013

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Watch out for cheats in citation game

Watch out for cheats in citation game | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

The focus on impact of published research has created new opportunities for misconduct and fraudsters, says Mario Biagioli. (...) - Nature, by Mario Biagioli, 12 July 2016

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Are 90% of academic papers really never cited? Reviewing the literature on academic citations.

Are 90% of academic papers really never cited? Reviewing the literature on academic citations. | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

It is widely accepted that academic papers are rarely cited or even read. But what kind of data lies behind these assertions? Dahlia Remler takes a look at the academic research on citation practices and finds that whilst it is clear citation rates are low, much confusion remains over precise figures and methods for determining accurate citation analysis. In her investigation, Remler wonders whether academics are able to answer these key questions. But expert evaluation has indeed correctly discredited the overblown claim resulting from embellished journalism. (...) - by Dahlia Remler, Blog LSE "Impact of social sciences", 2014/04/23

 

 

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New research on where to find the most research citations

New research on where to find the most research citations | Higher Education and academic research | Scoop.it

Countries outside the world's elite university systems are better at transforming research capacity into citations, a report suggests.

While the U.S. and the U.K. are good at converting research inputs into outputs and are improving, the likes of Denmark, Switzerland, France and Ireland are making the most of their resources and improving efficiency at a greater rate, the study by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has found. (...) - by Elizabeth Gibney for Times Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, May 24, 2013

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