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Getting Down to the Reality of a $10,000 Bachelor's Degree - Administration - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Getting Down to the Reality of a $10,000 Bachelor's Degree - Administration - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Higher Education Administration- Student Affairs | Scoop.it
With a YouTube comment and a governor's challenge, the idea has grown into a kind of Rorschach test for how Americans view higher education.

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Smithstorian's curator insight, March 7, 2013 10:50 AM

It's one of those YouTube clips that probably would have evaporated if it had featured anyone other than Bill Gates.

 

In August 2010, Mr. Gates, founder of Microsoft, speaking informally at a technology conference, said technological innovations should be able to lower the cost of college to $2,000 a year.

 

Mr. Gates's comments reportedly caught the attention of Gov. Rick Perry, a Republican of Texas, who came up with his own back-of-the-envelope estimate of how much college should cost: Multiplying $2,000 times four and adding $2,000 for the cost of books or other learning materials, the governor decided that a bachelor's degree should cost $10,000.

 

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To those who see it as a good idea, the $10,000 degree amounts to an indictment of higher education: Traditional colleges are elitist institutions that cater to the affluent and produce graduates with little practical work-force knowledge.

 

Governors including Tom Corbett, of Pennsylvania; Rick Scott, of Florida; and Scott Walker, of Wisconsin, have endorsed policies to encourage more job-training skills while questioning the value of the humanities and social sciences in academe.

 

The public's views about the value and direction of higher education are more ambivalent. Nearly 70 percent of those who responded to the annual Gallup/Lumina Foundation poll released in February think a college degree is essential for getting a good job, but nearly three-quarters said higher education was not affordable to "everyone who needs it."

 

Thomas Lindsay, director of the Center for Higher Education Policy at the Texas Public Policy Foundation, a conservative-leaning group, says the $10,000 degree is in part a response to "the growing contempt that students and parents have for higher education."

 

The college degree is now seen by many solely as a way to earn the commonly cited million-dollar salary differential between college graduates and those without a degree. Those extra earnings have been touted by higher education for at least a decade as colleges tried to preserve state appropriations.

 

But in doing so, higher education has been promoting its economic value at the expense of the liberal arts and humanities, says Mr. Lindsay, a former political-science instructor. If colleges made clearer the value of education itself, "the dignity of that pursuit would have impressed itself on lawmakers and the public," he says. "For me, the tragedy of higher education is not that it was forced out of this role, but that it walked away."

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Twitter101 for Higher Education

UsingIn Student AffairsTwitterPresented by:Ed CabellonDirector, Campus CenterBridgewater State Univ.Webinar for Studen...

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"There's nothing wrong with cautious leadership in higher education" - SCUP's Planning for Higher Ed Mojo

This Inside Higher Ed essay was written by SCUPer Terry Brown, who is interim senior special assistant for academic and student affairs in the University of Wi…

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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, January 2, 2013 9:39 AM

It is true that we are faced with an existential choice: adapt or die. But if in adapting we lose who we are, we have not survived. I encourage campus leaders to put down their Harvard Business Review and go see Spielberg’s "Lincoln," whose example of leadership in the midst of great social turmoil has more relevance to the context of American higher education which was itself founded on "a faith in slow, deliberate, incremental transformation."

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Engagement is

As a part of Seattle University's Student Development Administration 'Foundations of Student Affairs' course we were asked to define our philosophy of educat...

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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, December 11, 2012 10:06 AM

What IS engagement?  What would the kids say?

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When Scandal Unfolds on Your Campus | #SAChat Transcript — 11/10/11

When Scandal Unfolds on Your Campus | #SAChat Transcript — 11/10/11 | Higher Education Administration- Student Affairs | Scoop.it

Enjoy this compilation of a Twitter chat conducted by The Student Affairs Blog. You may be surprised by how much you can learn by skimming a list of 221 micro-blog posts, each no more than 140 total characters.

 

"Thanks to everyone who participated in our #SAchat focused on When Scandal Unfolds on Your Campus. Our chat produced 221 tweets from 60 student affairs professionals, graduate students and undergraduates interested or working in the Student Affairs field!"


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An avalanche is coming: Higher education and the revolution ahead [IPPR]

An avalanche is coming: Higher education and the revolution ahead [IPPR] | Higher Education Administration- Student Affairs | Scoop.it

"Our belief is that deep, radical and urgent transformation is required in higher education as much as it is in school systems." Michael Barber, Katelyn Donnelly, Saad Rizvi; Foreword byLarry Summers.


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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, March 11, 2013 9:32 AM

Download the full PDF document here (PDF). [IPPR]
 

This wide-ranging essay aims to provoke creative dialogue and challenge complacency in our traditional higher education institutions.

'Just as globalisation and technology have transformed other huge sectors of the economy in the past 20 years, in the next 20 years universities face transformation.'


With a massive diversification in the range of providers, methods and technologies delivering tertiary education worldwide, the assumptions underlying the traditional relationship between universities, students and local and national economies are increasingly under great pressure – a revolution is coming.

Mélanie Ciussi's curator insight, March 11, 2013 10:17 AM

Full study available.