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Acrobatiq. New company born from Carnegie Mellon

Acrobatiq. New company born from Carnegie Mellon | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it
Acrobatiq

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Keith Hampson PhD 's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:45 AM

An exicting new company. (But then I'm on the team!) Acrobatiq from Carnegie Mellon University. 

Domitilla Enders's curator insight, July 30, 2013 10:55 PM

Intelligent Courseware, Learning Analytics and more based on the science of learning...promising to "improve learning measurably"...spinoff from OLI...stay tuned for launch this August

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The Elephant in Higher Education’s Classrooms - Faculty and Change — The Transformation of Education

The Elephant in Higher Education’s Classrooms - Faculty and Change  — The Transformation of Education | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it
The Elephant in Higher Education’s Classrooms – Faculty and Change Part I

 

Photo Courtesy of Playlands.Org 

 

We’ve done a good bit of …
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Yale Joins the MOOC Club; Coursera Looks to Translate Existing Courses - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Yale Joins the MOOC Club; Coursera Looks to Translate Existing Courses - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it

For all the star power harnessed by massive-open-online-course providers, Yale University has been a notable absence. While many of its elite peers scrambled to get out ahead of the MOOC wave, Yale bided its time.

 

That’s about to change. Yale announced on Wednesday that it would soon offer MOOCs through Coursera, the Silicon Valley-based company.


Via Smithstorian
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Smithstorian's curator insight, May 16, 2013 11:42 AM

Yale plans to offer four courses beginning in January, focusing on constitutional law, financial markets, morality, and Roman architecture.

 

The move was a long time coming. Yale, which in 2007 became among the first institutions to make its course content available free on the Web with its Open Yale Courses lecture series, has taken a distinctly deliberate approach to MOOCs. Last fall it convened a faculty committee to recommend a broad online agenda that would encompass MOOCs as well as other forms of online teaching.

 

“We understand that there are institutional considerations (ranging from entrance fees to intellectual-property issues to regulatory-compliance matters) that may govern which MOOC platforms could be pursued by Yale,” the committee wrote in a report last December.

 

Nevertheless, it continued, “we recommend that Yale should use one or more of the new MOOC platforms to continue the free, online dissemination of Yale’s teaching materials.”

 

Apart from MOOCs, the committee recommended that Yale begin offering online language courses for credit “that could be available to Yale College students as well as students enrolled at peer universities elsewhere.”

Coursera, meanwhile, announced on Wednesday that it had created partnerships with a raft of companies and nonprofit groups that will work on translating its MOOCs into various foreign languages, including Arabic, Japanese, Kazakh, Portuguese, Russian, Turkish, and Ukrainian, which are the native tongues of a number of countries where Coursera’s English-language MOOCs have been popular.

 

There is substantial demand worldwide for American higher education, but experts have warned that MOOC providers that wish to serve a global audience face a challenge in accommodating various languages and cultures. And while many MOOCs are oriented to the common languages of mathematics and numbers, language barriers have caused some problems for MOOCs that rely on peer grading.

 

For its part, Coursera has focused of late on expanding overseas, where, surveys have shown, most of its registrants reside. In February, Coursera announced partnerships with 16 foreign universities.

 

The company said its efforts to serve non-English speakers would happen in phases. “For the time being, course lectures will be translated via subtitles while all other course material, including quizzes and assignments, will remain in the course’s original language,” it said in its news release. “Coursera’s long-term goal is to have our platform localized to global audiences.”

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Suzy Lee Weiss: To (All) the Colleges That Rejected Me

Suzy Lee Weiss: To (All) the Colleges That Rejected Me | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it
In The Wall Street Journal, high-school senior Suzy Lee Weiss imagines how her fate might have differed if she had a tiger mom or started a fake charity.

Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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A Truly Devastating Graph on State Higher Education Spending

A Truly Devastating Graph on State Higher Education Spending | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it
Some states have slashed per-student spending by as much as half.

Via John Shank, Keith Hampson PhD
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John Shank's curator insight, March 22, 2013 10:51 AM

"Unless technology allows colleges massively more efficient more quickly than anybody currently expects, or state coffers heal enough to start restoring these lost dollars, we're going to be living with the effects of these cuts for a long time." Is this why some think MOOCs are the future of Higher Ed.?

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The Dissertation Can No Longer Be Defended - Graduate Students - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Dissertation Can No Longer Be Defended - Graduate Students - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it
Sentiment is growing to move beyond the traditional, book-length monograph to something that might actually help graduate students in their careers.

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Smithstorian's curator insight, February 11, 2013 10:34 PM

The dissertation is broken, many scholars agree. So now what?

 

Rethinking the academic centerpiece of a graduate education is an obvious place to start if, as many people believe, Ph.D. programs are in a state of crisis. Universities face urgent calls to reduce the time it takes to complete degrees, reduce attrition, and do more to prepare doctoral candidates for nonacademic careers, as students face rising debt and increased competition for a shrinking number of tenure-track jobs.

 

As a result, many faculty and administrators wonder if now may finally be the time for graduate programs to begin to modernize on a large scale and move beyond the traditional, book-length dissertation.

 

That scholarly opus, some say, lingers on as a stubborn relic that has limited value to many scholars' careers and, ultimately, might just be a big waste of time.

 

"It takes too long. It's too isolating," says William Pannapacker, an associate professor of English at Hope College and a critic of graduate education who writes frequently for The Chronicle. Producing a dissertation is particularly poor preparation, he adds, for graduates whose first jobs are outside of academe—now roughly half of new Ph.D.'s with postgraduation employment commitments. "It's a hazing ritual passed down from another era, retained because the Ph.D.'s before us had to do it."

 

Scholars cite numerous reasons for why the dissertation is outdated and should no longer be a one-size-fits-all model for Ph.D. students.

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new journal— Learning Communities Research and Practice

Abstract

Within a 25-year period, the dramatic changes from college education as a “private good” that serves a predominantly white male student population to college education as a “public good”—where almost 90% of high school students of all racial and ethnic backgrounds aspire to attend college—has forced higher education to face a new complex reality: the students present are not the ones we know how to teach. Faced with a series of problems associated with student persistence, retention, and graduation, the challenge for learning community practitioners is to provide evidence to campus leaders that “the magic ingredient” of most successful learning communities—the collaboration between student affairs and academic affairs—does make a difference in student engagement and success. Without evidence and proof, though, learning community programs will not be allocated needed resources. This transcript of a 2007 keynote was given at the 12th Annual National Learning Communities Conference by the statewide director of the P-20 alignment work at the University System of Maryland.


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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60 Seconds Guide to Students Effective Search Techniques ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | eLearning and eTeaching

60 Seconds Guide to Students Effective Search Techniques ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | eLearning and eTeaching | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it
60 Seconds Guide to Students Effective Search Techniques ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning on eLearning and eTeaching curated by WebTeachers (Have you seen: 60 Seconds Guide to Students Effective Search Techniques ~ Educational...

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, February 9, 2013 11:14 AM

Now this is a must for students...and teachers. ;)

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The Billion-Dollar Bet on an Adaptive Learning Platform

The Billion-Dollar Bet on an Adaptive Learning Platform | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it

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Social media in Higher Education: A literature review and research directions


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Measuring the growth of online learning: the Babson College 2012 survey

Measuring the growth of online learning: the Babson College 2012 survey | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it

Via GRIAL Univ Salamanca. Aprendoenred.
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learning designer's curator insight, January 21, 2013 10:46 PM

Online learning keeps growing.

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A Blow to the College-Industrial Complex

A Blow to the College-Industrial Complex | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it
Heather Mac Donald writes on NRO: The New York Times seems concerned that teens in the fracking belt of eastern Montana are opting to work in the new oil-field economy right after high school rather than going straight on to college.

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D., Keith Hampson PhD
Donna Murdoch's insight:

Not sure why it is either/or?  Can't they go to school later?

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Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.'s curator insight, December 29, 2012 9:35 AM
Heather Mac Donald writes: "colleges’ own curricular decisions have long since destroyed their right to present themselves as a gateway for precious knowledge of the past."
Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.'s comment, December 29, 2012 2:33 PM
Sure, the problem is that the system has been set so young people feel that college is a must do right after high school.
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Universities should sink their resources into publishing partnerships with scholarly societies

Universities should sink their resources into publishing partnerships with scholarly societies | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it

Christopher Land writes that a hybrid partnership between the university press and scholarly society would put publishing back under academic control and would produce a more open, and impactful, f...


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The State of E-Learning in Higher Education: An Eye Toward Growth and Increased Access | EDUCAUSE.edu

The State of E-Learning in Higher Education: An Eye Toward Growth and Increased Access | EDUCAUSE.edu | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it

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The Myth and the Millennialism of "Disruptive Innovation"

The Myth and the Millennialism of "Disruptive Innovation" | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, May 26, 2013 5:29 AM

Here are a couple of (education-related) end-times predictions from Clayton Christensen:

Disruptive innovation will be, as Techcrunch (among other acolytes) is happy to profess, the end of school as we know it.

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The Future of Higher Education: Massive Online Open Disruption | Collective Intelligence | Big Think

The Future of Higher Education: Massive Online Open Disruption | Collective Intelligence | Big Think | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it
Is a college education fundamentally an expensive insurance product that is purchased to avoid falling through the cracks in our society? If so, what can take its place?

Via Minter Dial, Peter Bryant
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Minter Dial's curator insight, April 1, 2013 1:29 AM

Talk about not respecting higher education, by promoting the drop out... Breaking the codes!

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Through the Noise: Balance in a Digital World

Through the Noise: Balance in a Digital World | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it
Photo Credit: giulia.forsythe via Compfight cc When thinking about balance in a digital world, three questions come to mind: Why is balance necessary, how do we demonstrate or measure it, and are e...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, David Hain, Peter Bryant
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 21, 2013 11:46 PM

As educators, we need to teach about digital footprints and how they can impact our lives, both online and offline. Yet, can we sometimes inadvertently condone or not condone online attitudes. For example, it  can be difficult to avoid playing into the culture of public shaming that often occurs in social media. Perhaps the public shaming of individuals who have made poor online presence choices, generating “digital tattoos” as some have coined it (prints you are stuck with), is not the best way to instill an attitude of thoughtful dialogue and respect with regard to digital citizenship. After all, if public shaming becomes the norm, will society become immune to social consequences? Additionally, some may view a tattoo as a work of art or a sign of creativity. Instead, a willingness to listen, understand, help and support may set a better example. Through listening, we can create opportunities to help each other navigate this difficult digital world (a world that will undoubtedly see us make many more mistakes). Let’s listen; together we might just find balance!

Brad Ovenell-Carter's curator insight, March 22, 2013 2:10 PM

As you say Ana, this is a journey we (in schools) have to make together with students and their families. No one really knows where all this will land and every community will have different needs so the only possible way forward is through constant dialogue with all stakeholders. At my school, we're developing that conversation arounf the Brand of Me, something I think sounds more proactive that digital footprints or tattoos; those are things you leave behind, passively. See this discussion over on Bill Ferriter's blog: http://teacherleaders.typepad.com/the_tempered_radical/2013/03/guest-post-braddo-on-digital-footprints.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+the_tempered_radical+(The+Tempered+Radical)

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avalanche-is-coming_Mar2013_10432.pdf


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Peter Bryant's curator insight, March 15, 2013 6:59 AM

a fascinating insight into the potential future of higher education.  It is definitely a case of sh!t or get off the pot

Lance Scaife-Elliott's curator insight, March 18, 2013 12:16 AM

this is really interesting.

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Special Themed Issue on Creativity and Open Educational Resources (OER)

Special Themed Issue on Creativity and Open Educational Resources (OER) | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it

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Don't Let Strategy Become Planning

Don't Let Strategy Become Planning | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it

"But how does a strategic plan of this sort differ from a budget? Many people with whom I work find it hard to distinguish between the two and wonder why a company needs to have both. And I think they are right to wonder. The vast majority of strategic plans that I have seen over 30 years of working in the strategy realm are simply budgets with lots of explanatory words attached. This may be the case because the finance function is deeply involved in the strategy process in most organizations. But it is also the cause of the deep antipathy I see, especially amongst line executives, toward strategic planning. I know very few who look forward with joy to the commencement of the next strategic planning cycle."


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, February 7, 2013 8:26 AM

Really? "To make strategy more interesting — and different from a budget — we need to break free of this obsession with planning."

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Social Media and Digital Identity: All About You, Me, or Us? // Speaker Deck

Social Media and Digital Identity: All About You, Me, or Us? // Speaker Deck | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it

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12 Trends Transforming the Post-Sec Landscape

12 Trends Transforming the Post-Sec Landscape | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it
The number of post-secondary students taking an online course has nearly quadrupled over the last decade to nearly 7 million students, with nearly one-third of all postsecondary students in the US taking at least one online course.

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Competence, Excellence, and Innovation in Higher Education ...

Competence, Excellence, and Innovation in Higher Education ... | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it
So I've gotten several emails this morning asking me what I think about this article by Paul J. LeBlanc, the president of Southern New Hampshire University. It's a plea for accrediting agencies to take seriously ...

Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D., Peter Bryant
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Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.'s curator insight, February 3, 2013 9:30 PM
Interestingly enough, Paul J. LeBlanc responds to this article in the reader's comments area.
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Writing your Kindle Book from an App? Yes! It is possible.

Writing your Kindle Book from an App? Yes! It is possible. | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it

I never considered writing a novel from an App! I now know that it is definitely possible with the technology we have available to us today. My memory reaches back to remember a game that we played as kids, where you had several circles of various shapes all attached together with a brad. You spun those circles to land on various word choices, which when put all together, would create a story. This is the logic behind the "Brainstormer" App ($1.99) for the Iphone.

 

If your car battery dies, you can give it a jump start to replenish lost power. Your brain may need the same boost, but it's probably best that you not do it with an electrical charge. :) Filled with thousands of possible combinations between three columns, the app helps create the perfect prompt to get your juices flowing again.

 

How clever!

 

From the website: "There's no perfect formula for crafting a novel. In fact, some of the best tales that withstand the tests of time are the ones that break the rules and invent a new narrative. The simplest of ideas can blow up into 100,000 words of masterfully crafted storytelling with proper development. While the words are the most important part of any novel, what is a craftsperson without his or her tools? We've collected eight apps that will help you turn aspirations into novelizations. "

 

This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on Ebook Promotion and Marketing at www.scoop.it/philosbooks


Via Jon Samuelson, Jim Lerman, Luciana Viter, Robert Chazz Chute, Penelope, Jimun Gimm
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Katherine Conner's curator insight, March 29, 2013 1:39 PM

Everyone, without exception, requires a tool to complete the task that they were employed to do. Often, when writing, people may not know where to begin. They may not have any idea as to how to organize their thoughts. The applications suggested by AJ Dellinger on Mac Life seem like an excellent way to structure not only the key points within your story, but also helps you structure your time in order to incorporate those key points. The application "Novel in 30" allows the user to set a word count target, and a deadline goal. It also allows you to sync the document between itunes and allows the use of Dropbox for easy access. "Writers App" helps structure all ideas dealing with plot, character, and setting. "MindNode"allows the user to create a literal map of their thoughts, and therefore allowing the user to re-create or continue their previous thought process at a later time. Other applications discussed in this article assist with research, brainstorming, timing, and even publication! I think these applications will prove to be powerful tools not only for aspiring novelists, but also authors who are veterans of the writing and publication processes. Each story that a person decides to tell is individual, so each journey to bring that story to an audience is just as individual.

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This Time Is Different: US Enrollment and Employment Divergence

This Time Is Different: US Enrollment and Employment Divergence | Higher Ed Technology | Scoop.it
When looking at long-term trends for higher education, it is useful to step back and look at the big picture. With this goal in mind, consider the comparison of post-secondary enrollment in degree-...

Via Mark Smithers
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