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Social Networking Safety - Parent presentation (@pauldavisSNS) - Today! April 27th - Ottawa 7:00 pm

Social Networking Safety - Parent presentation (@pauldavisSNS) - Today! April 27th - Ottawa 7:00 pm | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
Thank you for registering to attend this presentation for parents
Everyone is welcome to attend!

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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3 Minute Tech Tool Tutorial: Screencast-O-Matic — Try a tool a week challenge

3 Minute Tech Tool Tutorial: Screencast-O-Matic — Try a tool a week challenge | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
Screencast-O-Matic Provides Free Screencasting, and Adds Additional Powerful Functionality for Just $15 a Year! This week on the Try-a-Tool-a-Week Challenge, we’re checking out Screencast-O-Matic. The Challenge is an easy, fun thing we’ve been doing on the site here in which

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
The concept aims to raise academic expectations by teaching students and teachers how to think of intelligence as something that can be improved through effort and experimentation.


"It's one thing to say all students can learn, but making them believe it—and do it—can require a 180-degree shift in students' and teachers' sense of themselves and of one another."


Via Mel Riddile
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Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:19 PM

Key points on Mindsets:


  1. Teaching from a "growth mindset" orientation helps us to overcome the "soft bigotry of low expectations"?
  2. "Growth Mindset"—1. seek challenges, 2. learn from mistakes, and 3. keep faith in themselves in the face of failure. 
  3. Students with a growth mindset 1. improve more in academics and other skills, and can even be 2. less aggressive and 3. more socially engaged.
  4. "The thing is, kids don't mind failing," said David Dockterman, Scholastic's chief architect of learning sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "When kids play video games, they fail 80 percent of the time. They look at failure there as an opportunity to learn."
  5. Teachers often confuse "teaching a growth mindset and exhorting kids to try hard," Ms. Dweck said. "You can't just tell a child to try hard without giving them strategies and supporting their efforts."
  6. Minor changes to student feedback—such as providing improvement-related praise vs. general encouragement—improved student persistence and math achievement, they found.
  7. Praising students' strategies, focus, effort, persistence, and improvement "takes the spotlight off fixed ability and puts it on the process of learning," Ms. Dweck said.
  8. It's important for teachers to go into detail when citing a student's correct answer.
Rescooped by 3rdheard from Leading Schools
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'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
The concept aims to raise academic expectations by teaching students and teachers how to think of intelligence as something that can be improved through effort and experimentation.


"It's one thing to say all students can learn, but making them believe it—and do it—can require a 180-degree shift in students' and teachers' sense of themselves and of one another."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:19 PM

Key points on Mindsets:


  1. Teaching from a "growth mindset" orientation helps us to overcome the "soft bigotry of low expectations"?
  2. "Growth Mindset"—1. seek challenges, 2. learn from mistakes, and 3. keep faith in themselves in the face of failure. 
  3. Students with a growth mindset 1. improve more in academics and other skills, and can even be 2. less aggressive and 3. more socially engaged.
  4. "The thing is, kids don't mind failing," said David Dockterman, Scholastic's chief architect of learning sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "When kids play video games, they fail 80 percent of the time. They look at failure there as an opportunity to learn."
  5. Teachers often confuse "teaching a growth mindset and exhorting kids to try hard," Ms. Dweck said. "You can't just tell a child to try hard without giving them strategies and supporting their efforts."
  6. Minor changes to student feedback—such as providing improvement-related praise vs. general encouragement—improved student persistence and math achievement, they found.
  7. Praising students' strategies, focus, effort, persistence, and improvement "takes the spotlight off fixed ability and puts it on the process of learning," Ms. Dweck said.
  8. It's important for teachers to go into detail when citing a student's correct answer.
Rescooped by 3rdheard from Leading Schools
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'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
The concept aims to raise academic expectations by teaching students and teachers how to think of intelligence as something that can be improved through effort and experimentation.


"It's one thing to say all students can learn, but making them believe it—and do it—can require a 180-degree shift in students' and teachers' sense of themselves and of one another."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:19 PM

Key points on Mindsets:


  1. Teaching from a "growth mindset" orientation helps us to overcome the "soft bigotry of low expectations"?
  2. "Growth Mindset"—1. seek challenges, 2. learn from mistakes, and 3. keep faith in themselves in the face of failure. 
  3. Students with a growth mindset 1. improve more in academics and other skills, and can even be 2. less aggressive and 3. more socially engaged.
  4. "The thing is, kids don't mind failing," said David Dockterman, Scholastic's chief architect of learning sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "When kids play video games, they fail 80 percent of the time. They look at failure there as an opportunity to learn."
  5. Teachers often confuse "teaching a growth mindset and exhorting kids to try hard," Ms. Dweck said. "You can't just tell a child to try hard without giving them strategies and supporting their efforts."
  6. Minor changes to student feedback—such as providing improvement-related praise vs. general encouragement—improved student persistence and math achievement, they found.
  7. Praising students' strategies, focus, effort, persistence, and improvement "takes the spotlight off fixed ability and puts it on the process of learning," Ms. Dweck said.
  8. It's important for teachers to go into detail when citing a student's correct answer.
Rescooped by 3rdheard from Leading Schools
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'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
The concept aims to raise academic expectations by teaching students and teachers how to think of intelligence as something that can be improved through effort and experimentation.


"It's one thing to say all students can learn, but making them believe it—and do it—can require a 180-degree shift in students' and teachers' sense of themselves and of one another."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:19 PM

Key points on Mindsets:


  1. Teaching from a "growth mindset" orientation helps us to overcome the "soft bigotry of low expectations"?
  2. "Growth Mindset"—1. seek challenges, 2. learn from mistakes, and 3. keep faith in themselves in the face of failure. 
  3. Students with a growth mindset 1. improve more in academics and other skills, and can even be 2. less aggressive and 3. more socially engaged.
  4. "The thing is, kids don't mind failing," said David Dockterman, Scholastic's chief architect of learning sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "When kids play video games, they fail 80 percent of the time. They look at failure there as an opportunity to learn."
  5. Teachers often confuse "teaching a growth mindset and exhorting kids to try hard," Ms. Dweck said. "You can't just tell a child to try hard without giving them strategies and supporting their efforts."
  6. Minor changes to student feedback—such as providing improvement-related praise vs. general encouragement—improved student persistence and math achievement, they found.
  7. Praising students' strategies, focus, effort, persistence, and improvement "takes the spotlight off fixed ability and puts it on the process of learning," Ms. Dweck said.
  8. It's important for teachers to go into detail when citing a student's correct answer.
Rescooped by 3rdheard from Leading Schools
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'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
The concept aims to raise academic expectations by teaching students and teachers how to think of intelligence as something that can be improved through effort and experimentation.


"It's one thing to say all students can learn, but making them believe it—and do it—can require a 180-degree shift in students' and teachers' sense of themselves and of one another."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:19 PM

Key points on Mindsets:


  1. Teaching from a "growth mindset" orientation helps us to overcome the "soft bigotry of low expectations"?
  2. "Growth Mindset"—1. seek challenges, 2. learn from mistakes, and 3. keep faith in themselves in the face of failure. 
  3. Students with a growth mindset 1. improve more in academics and other skills, and can even be 2. less aggressive and 3. more socially engaged.
  4. "The thing is, kids don't mind failing," said David Dockterman, Scholastic's chief architect of learning sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "When kids play video games, they fail 80 percent of the time. They look at failure there as an opportunity to learn."
  5. Teachers often confuse "teaching a growth mindset and exhorting kids to try hard," Ms. Dweck said. "You can't just tell a child to try hard without giving them strategies and supporting their efforts."
  6. Minor changes to student feedback—such as providing improvement-related praise vs. general encouragement—improved student persistence and math achievement, they found.
  7. Praising students' strategies, focus, effort, persistence, and improvement "takes the spotlight off fixed ability and puts it on the process of learning," Ms. Dweck said.
  8. It's important for teachers to go into detail when citing a student's correct answer.
Rescooped by 3rdheard from Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
The concept aims to raise academic expectations by teaching students and teachers how to think of intelligence as something that can be improved through effort and experimentation.

 

"It's one thing to say all students can learn, but making them believe it—and do it—can require a 180-degree shift in students' and teachers' sense of themselves and of one another."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:19 PM

Key points on Mindsets:


  1. Teaching from a "growth mindset" orientation helps us to overcome the "soft bigotry of low expectations"?
  2. "Growth Mindset"—1. seek challenges, 2. learn from mistakes, and 3. keep faith in themselves in the face of failure. 
  3. Students with a growth mindset 1. improve more in academics and other skills, and can even be 2. less aggressive and 3. more socially engaged.
  4. "The thing is, kids don't mind failing," said David Dockterman, Scholastic's chief architect of learning sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "When kids play video games, they fail 80 percent of the time. They look at failure there as an opportunity to learn."
  5. Teachers often confuse "teaching a growth mindset and exhorting kids to try hard," Ms. Dweck said. "You can't just tell a child to try hard without giving them strategies and supporting their efforts."
  6. Minor changes to student feedback—such as providing improvement-related praise vs. general encouragement—improved student persistence and math achievement, they found.
  7. Praising students' strategies, focus, effort, persistence, and improvement "takes the spotlight off fixed ability and puts it on the process of learning," Ms. Dweck said.
  8. It's important for teachers to go into detail when citing a student's correct answer.
Rescooped by 3rdheard from Assessment
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Grades that Show What Students Know - Marzano & Heflebower.pdf

Grades that Show What Students Know - Marzano & Heflebower.pdf | High School Leadership | Scoop.it

Via Suzy Rabbat
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Future Business Leaders of America announces top students at ...

First place: Aneesh Agrawal, Centennial High School, Howard County Public Schools, Md., in Technology Concepts; and Kaitlyn Doyle, Henry Senachwine High School, in Henry, Ill., in the Job Interview event.
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Google Tips and Tricks - "I didn't know I could do that in Google!"

Google tips and tricks presentation to educators on Nov. 6, 2014 at BIT14 (ECOO) in Niagara Falls Ontario Canada.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Jennifer McGuff's curator insight, August 1, 2015 4:49 PM

Google tips, tricks and tutorials that I definitely did not know about it.

Christine Rounsevell's curator insight, August 26, 2015 8:28 PM

Ok. I admit I didn't know Google could do half those things!

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, November 19, 2015 5:31 PM

#Google #Education #Apps

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A Framework for Schools to Work with Families: Partners not "people who need saving"

A Framework for Schools to Work with Families: Partners not "people who need saving" | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
Karen Mapp, keynote speaker at the Children's Institute's annual luncheon, says, "If you're not including your families in the conversation about student learning, you've missed out on a core ingredient."

 

Framework For Schools To Work With Families.

The Oregonian (4/26, Wang) reports that Harvard lecturer Karen Mapp spoke at the Children’s Institute’s luncheon Friday and argued that successful schools have to treat families as partners rather than clients, supplements, or, in the words of the paper, “people who need saving.” She adds that working with families takes more time and energy but leads to better results. Along with the ED, Mapp has created a framework for working with families, which includes families understanding what their children are learning, building relationships between teachers and parents, and making families feel like they are real partners in the process.


Via Mel Riddile
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'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
The concept aims to raise academic expectations by teaching students and teachers how to think of intelligence as something that can be improved through effort and experimentation.


"It's one thing to say all students can learn, but making them believe it—and do it—can require a 180-degree shift in students' and teachers' sense of themselves and of one another."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:19 PM

Key points on Mindsets:


  1. Teaching from a "growth mindset" orientation helps us to overcome the "soft bigotry of low expectations"?
  2. "Growth Mindset"—1. seek challenges, 2. learn from mistakes, and 3. keep faith in themselves in the face of failure. 
  3. Students with a growth mindset 1. improve more in academics and other skills, and can even be 2. less aggressive and 3. more socially engaged.
  4. "The thing is, kids don't mind failing," said David Dockterman, Scholastic's chief architect of learning sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "When kids play video games, they fail 80 percent of the time. They look at failure there as an opportunity to learn."
  5. Teachers often confuse "teaching a growth mindset and exhorting kids to try hard," Ms. Dweck said. "You can't just tell a child to try hard without giving them strategies and supporting their efforts."
  6. Minor changes to student feedback—such as providing improvement-related praise vs. general encouragement—improved student persistence and math achievement, they found.
  7. Praising students' strategies, focus, effort, persistence, and improvement "takes the spotlight off fixed ability and puts it on the process of learning," Ms. Dweck said.
  8. It's important for teachers to go into detail when citing a student's correct answer.
Rescooped by 3rdheard from Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
The concept aims to raise academic expectations by teaching students and teachers how to think of intelligence as something that can be improved through effort and experimentation.


"It's one thing to say all students can learn, but making them believe it—and do it—can require a 180-degree shift in students' and teachers' sense of themselves and of one another."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:19 PM

Key points on Mindsets:


  1. Teaching from a "growth mindset" orientation helps us to overcome the "soft bigotry of low expectations"?
  2. "Growth Mindset"—1. seek challenges, 2. learn from mistakes, and 3. keep faith in themselves in the face of failure. 
  3. Students with a growth mindset 1. improve more in academics and other skills, and can even be 2. less aggressive and 3. more socially engaged.
  4. "The thing is, kids don't mind failing," said David Dockterman, Scholastic's chief architect of learning sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "When kids play video games, they fail 80 percent of the time. They look at failure there as an opportunity to learn."
  5. Teachers often confuse "teaching a growth mindset and exhorting kids to try hard," Ms. Dweck said. "You can't just tell a child to try hard without giving them strategies and supporting their efforts."
  6. Minor changes to student feedback—such as providing improvement-related praise vs. general encouragement—improved student persistence and math achievement, they found.
  7. Praising students' strategies, focus, effort, persistence, and improvement "takes the spotlight off fixed ability and puts it on the process of learning," Ms. Dweck said.
  8. It's important for teachers to go into detail when citing a student's correct answer.
Rescooped by 3rdheard from Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
The concept aims to raise academic expectations by teaching students and teachers how to think of intelligence as something that can be improved through effort and experimentation.


"It's one thing to say all students can learn, but making them believe it—and do it—can require a 180-degree shift in students' and teachers' sense of themselves and of one another."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:19 PM

Key points on Mindsets:


  1. Teaching from a "growth mindset" orientation helps us to overcome the "soft bigotry of low expectations"?
  2. "Growth Mindset"—1. seek challenges, 2. learn from mistakes, and 3. keep faith in themselves in the face of failure. 
  3. Students with a growth mindset 1. improve more in academics and other skills, and can even be 2. less aggressive and 3. more socially engaged.
  4. "The thing is, kids don't mind failing," said David Dockterman, Scholastic's chief architect of learning sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "When kids play video games, they fail 80 percent of the time. They look at failure there as an opportunity to learn."
  5. Teachers often confuse "teaching a growth mindset and exhorting kids to try hard," Ms. Dweck said. "You can't just tell a child to try hard without giving them strategies and supporting their efforts."
  6. Minor changes to student feedback—such as providing improvement-related praise vs. general encouragement—improved student persistence and math achievement, they found.
  7. Praising students' strategies, focus, effort, persistence, and improvement "takes the spotlight off fixed ability and puts it on the process of learning," Ms. Dweck said.
  8. It's important for teachers to go into detail when citing a student's correct answer.
Rescooped by 3rdheard from Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
The concept aims to raise academic expectations by teaching students and teachers how to think of intelligence as something that can be improved through effort and experimentation.


"It's one thing to say all students can learn, but making them believe it—and do it—can require a 180-degree shift in students' and teachers' sense of themselves and of one another."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:19 PM

Key points on Mindsets:


  1. Teaching from a "growth mindset" orientation helps us to overcome the "soft bigotry of low expectations"?
  2. "Growth Mindset"—1. seek challenges, 2. learn from mistakes, and 3. keep faith in themselves in the face of failure. 
  3. Students with a growth mindset 1. improve more in academics and other skills, and can even be 2. less aggressive and 3. more socially engaged.
  4. "The thing is, kids don't mind failing," said David Dockterman, Scholastic's chief architect of learning sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "When kids play video games, they fail 80 percent of the time. They look at failure there as an opportunity to learn."
  5. Teachers often confuse "teaching a growth mindset and exhorting kids to try hard," Ms. Dweck said. "You can't just tell a child to try hard without giving them strategies and supporting their efforts."
  6. Minor changes to student feedback—such as providing improvement-related praise vs. general encouragement—improved student persistence and math achievement, they found.
  7. Praising students' strategies, focus, effort, persistence, and improvement "takes the spotlight off fixed ability and puts it on the process of learning," Ms. Dweck said.
  8. It's important for teachers to go into detail when citing a student's correct answer.
Rescooped by 3rdheard from Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
The concept aims to raise academic expectations by teaching students and teachers how to think of intelligence as something that can be improved through effort and experimentation.


"It's one thing to say all students can learn, but making them believe it—and do it—can require a 180-degree shift in students' and teachers' sense of themselves and of one another."


Via Mel Riddile
more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, September 12, 2013 5:19 PM

Key points on Mindsets:


  1. Teaching from a "growth mindset" orientation helps us to overcome the "soft bigotry of low expectations"?
  2. "Growth Mindset"—1. seek challenges, 2. learn from mistakes, and 3. keep faith in themselves in the face of failure. 
  3. Students with a growth mindset 1. improve more in academics and other skills, and can even be 2. less aggressive and 3. more socially engaged.
  4. "The thing is, kids don't mind failing," said David Dockterman, Scholastic's chief architect of learning sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "When kids play video games, they fail 80 percent of the time. They look at failure there as an opportunity to learn."
  5. Teachers often confuse "teaching a growth mindset and exhorting kids to try hard," Ms. Dweck said. "You can't just tell a child to try hard without giving them strategies and supporting their efforts."
  6. Minor changes to student feedback—such as providing improvement-related praise vs. general encouragement—improved student persistence and math achievement, they found.
  7. Praising students' strategies, focus, effort, persistence, and improvement "takes the spotlight off fixed ability and puts it on the process of learning," Ms. Dweck said.
  8. It's important for teachers to go into detail when citing a student's correct answer.
Rescooped by 3rdheard from The 21st Century
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Are Schools Getting a Big Enough Bang for Their Education Technology Buck?

Are Schools Getting a Big Enough Bang for Their Education Technology Buck? | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
A new CAP analysis shows that too often students use computers for basic skills.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Area superintendent Mullins takes leadership duties at Heritage High - Florida Today

Area superintendent Mullins takes leadership duties at Heritage High - Florida Today | High School Leadership | Scoop.it
Area superintendent Mullins takes leadership duties at Heritage High Florida Today “Most people finish out the school year, but if they're eligible and ready to go, they do,” she said, adding that being a high school principal “is a really tough...
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