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The periodic table: how elements get their names - BBC News

The periodic table: how elements get their names - BBC News | Here we have chemistry! | Scoop.it
The periodic table: how elements get their names BBC News Frank James, Professor of the History of Science at The Royal Institution in London, where several elements were discovered, says that the contribution of British scientists was very...
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Infographic: The Chemistry Of Thanksgiving

Infographic: The Chemistry Of Thanksgiving | Here we have chemistry! | Scoop.it
A cute video explains how science can rid the world of dry turkey. (Infographic: The Chemistry Of Thanksgiving - A cute video explains how science can rid the world of dry turkey.Whe...
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Ponds on the Ocean : Image of the Day

Ponds on the Ocean : Image of the Day | Here we have chemistry! | Scoop.it

If you have never been north of the Arctic Circle, it is easy to imagine that the “ice cap” at the top of the world is a uniform sheet of white. The reality, particularly during the spring and summer melt, is a mottled landscape of white, teal, slate gray, green, and navy.

The sea ice atop the Arctic Ocean can—as shown in this photograph from July 12, 2011—look more like swiss cheese or a bright coastal wetland. As ice melts, the liquid water collects in depressions on the surface and deepens them, forming melt ponds. These fresh water ponds are separated from the salty sea below and around it, until breaks in the ice merge the two.

Researchers on the NASA-funded ICESCAPE mission—Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment—have been examining melt ponds, the ice around them, and the waters below for three weeks, with three more to go. Carried by the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy, a team of oceanographers, marine biologists, and glaciologists are investigating how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the ocean’s chemical and biological makeup.

NASA science writer Kathryn Hansen is blogging daily from the ICESCAPE cruise. Click here to learn some science, see what people are eating, and sample life on an Arctic icebreaker. You can also get a daily glimpse of the ice in the Arctic by clicking on the MODIS Rapid Response page.


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Mental illness: is 'chemical imbalance' theory a myth?

Mental illness: is 'chemical imbalance' theory a myth? | Here we have chemistry! | Scoop.it

 

A broken heart and a blue, bedevilled brain.

 

They’ve been twinned, metaphorically, in poetry and song for millennia.

 

Over the past 50 years, however, science and medicine have been contemplating the organs and their maladies on a purely biological basis.

In particular, an evolving half-century of medical wisdom came to this conclusion:

 

Just as coronary diseases — or those of the liver, or kidneys for that matter — were plainly the result of physiological disruptions, so too were the mental illnesses of the brain.

 

Now, neuroscience would attribute such things as depression and psychosis to “chemical imbalances” — specifically to disruptions in the neurotransmitters that allow the brain’s billions upon billions of grey matter cells to speak to one another.

 

And so mental illnesses became normalized and destigmatized.

And so their treatments, to a huge extent, came off of the couch, out of the asylums and onto pharmacy counters.

 

And so a $70-billion drug market grew to feed tens of millions worldwide with daily doses of magic bullets — pills that could bring their brain chemistry back into balance.

 

Trouble is, in the minds of many neuroscientists today, that chemical imbalance theory has turned out to be a myth, with little more scientific or medicinal substance than poetry or song.

 

And the pills are now largely recognized by a multitude of experts, as well as some of the pharmaceutical companies that make them, as concoctions of magical thinking.


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It's science friday! The chemistry of cookies

It's science friday! The chemistry of cookies | Here we have chemistry! | Scoop.it
Cookie science :) (It's science friday! The chemistry of cookies http://t.co/kLHHKLuaNI)
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Twitter / newdorp: In love with science experiments? ...

Twitter / newdorp: In love with science experiments? ... | Here we have chemistry! | Scoop.it
In love with science experiments? Then you'll find a lot of chemistry between you and our Science Fair book display! http://t.co/pRz3mwCIMA
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Toys that inspire science and chemistry - W*USA 9

Toys that inspire science and chemistry - W*USA 9 | Here we have chemistry! | Scoop.it
W*USA 9
Toys that inspire science and chemistry
W*USA 9
WASHINGTON, DC (WUSA) -- All of today's hot holiday toys have something in common, science and engineering can be fun to learn.
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Contest: create a new kind of science kit for kids

Contest: create a new kind of science kit for kids | Here we have chemistry! | Scoop.it
Remember how much fun chemistry sets used to be before the chemicals were deemed too dangerous for household fun?

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Mobile phone powered by urine | Chemistry World

Mobile phone powered by urine | Chemistry World | Here we have chemistry! | Scoop.it

The first mobile phone battery to be directly charged by microbial fuel cells feeding on neat urinehas been reported by scientists in the UK.

Back in 2011 we covered the urine-powered fuels cells being developed by Ioannis Ieropoulos and colleagues at Bristol Robotics Laboratory. They had shown that urine was an excellent fuel for direct electricity generation. As a bonus, the cells can reclaim essential nutrients from the urine, making waterwater treatment easier.

This latest study is the first time a commercially available mobile phone has been powered by urine-powered fuel cells. Cascades of electrically connected fuel cells use bacterial action to convert chemical energy in organic matter in urine into electricity.

The team hope their work will lead to emergency charging devices for remote locations.

 

The original resaerch here I A Ieropoulos et al, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013, DOI: 10.1039/c3cp52889h

 

 


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NatProdChem's curator insight, July 19, 2013 6:30 AM

This is valorisation !

Manoj Kushwaha's curator insight, July 27, 2013 12:29 AM

ultimate source of power

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Incredible Chemical Reaction!

Add me on Facebook. (click LIKE on Facebook to add me) http://www.facebook.com/brusspup Download the song in this video: Song name: Monolith iTunes https://i...
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