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With Willing Spirit, a Reprise for Ailey Dancers

With Willing Spirit, a Reprise for Ailey Dancers | Here and Now | Scoop.it
Retired Alvin Ailey company dancers will return to the stage on New Year’s Eve for a special performance of Ailey’s classic “Revelations.”
Alex Cowans's insight:

As a dancer, although new to the scene, I find this article to be amazing. What I found most interesting is when Mrs. Wood described the mindset of a young dancer versus and older dancer. She said that the young person is always looking for ways to get the movement quicker and how to push their bodies to the limit whereas older dancers think more about how they are comfortable with themselves. In my personal experience here at CI, Dance Instructor Heather Castillo has done a great job of making her students aware of their bodies so they can be comfortable with themselves.

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Why your brain loves music

Why your brain loves music | Here and Now | Scoop.it
New neuroscience study sets out to explain why in some respects music offers the same sort of pleasure as a really good thriller.

Via Gust MEES
Alex Cowans's insight:

I think it makes sense that music stimulates our brains. There have been many times when I have listened to new  music and it gets so good that I have to stop what I'm doing just to relish the moment. This phenomena of music being better than expected is the reason as to why when I buy new music, all I do is listen because I don't want any other distractions. I also agree with the author that a discussion between neuroscientists and musicians can reveal a lot of new information.

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Anna Fabo's curator insight, April 18, 2014 7:00 AM

Podreu descobrir que diuen els últims estudis sobre el perquè el nostre cervell li agrada tant la música.

Natalie Gaskins's curator insight, May 11, 2014 2:18 PM

One day, I would love to venture into the field that connects Neuroscience with Music and that is why this article caught my attention right away. I admit to listening to certain songs and having to completely stop whatever I am doing because it was THAT good. I always wondered why that is and why certain sounds that we hear trigger emotions, or stimulation in our brains. I can agree with what the writer said in that we set up expectations in our brains with familiar styles of music and loved to be deceived when the music takes a different direction.I also agree that it is no longer enjoyable when the music goes too astray from what my brain wanted. It just gets annoying that way! It keeps excitement in the song and makes you try to anticipate what is going to happen next. It is a way to keep the listener attentive. I know that when I song is too predictable, it quickly looses my attention. As a songwriter, I feel that this is very crucial when writing. We have to keep the audience engaged at all times. This is also why artists make certain line-up choices while performing at a gig. I thought it odd that we get a different level of satisfaction when we have paid for the music and are then anticipating the surprise. Very odd. 

I would love to venture deeper into these studies and unlock more neurological secrets. Knowledge like this can help sell music.

Sirenita Guzmán's curator insight, July 7, 2015 4:50 PM

añada su visión ...

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A 1945 Code of Ethics for Theatre Workers Surfaces | LA STAGE TIMES

A 1945 Code of Ethics for Theatre Workers Surfaces | LA STAGE TIMES | Here and Now | Scoop.it
Alex Cowans's insight:

These rules were written in 1945 for proper etiquette for working in a theatre. Honestly, when I saw the title, I thought about the social context, and made an assumption that the article was going to reveal some sort of appalling set of rules that came from our nation's racially deplorable past. But as it turns out, It is a basic guide to professionalism in the Performing Arts. Professionalism is huge in the Performing Arts. No matter how silly or serious the production, if you are not professional during the rehearsal process, it is an instant red flag for the company to never hire you again, and since directors, choreographers, stage managers, producers, etc. tend to hop around local performance venues, that red flag travels around. This article details what it means to behave as a professional performer and what is amazing about it is that most (if not all) rules are still applicable. I thought all of the rules were fine but as one commentator on the article pointed out that, even as an actor, if their relative  had passed away, they would not be performing. The commentator asserted that "I'm an actor, but I'm also a human being." Upon reading these rules in conjunction with the commentator's opinion, it also shows how the entertainment industry can be a little soul-less to those performers who happen upon unlucky circumstances. Nonetheless, most of these rules provide an excellent guideline for the performer, no matter what level of experience they are at.

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Learning to Say "No"

Learning to Say "No" | Here and Now | Scoop.it

I’ve made my share of good decisions during my career. But, as far as time management goes, I freely admit my struggles. Last year I drafted the post The Ugly Truth About Time Management, (partially based on my own relationship with time). Interestingly, it has been the most well read post at The Office Blend. Which leads me to believe that time — and our relationship with it — is a universal challenge.

 


Via Barb Jemmott
Alex Cowans's insight:

I found this article really helpful and relevant because I agreed to be in an extracurricular group despite my busy schedule between work, school, and rehearsal. I have to say no. This piece describes the reasons as to why people don't say no. It may be internal such as "I'm saying yes because I'm nice/don't want to miss out." They could also be external forces that "need" your help. Saying no does not mean you are weak, it just means you know your limits.

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5 Big Discoveries About Personal Effectiveness in 2013

5 Big Discoveries About Personal Effectiveness in 2013 | Here and Now | Scoop.it
Some of this year's bigger findings about how we can be more effective at work
Alex Cowans's insight:

I really liked this article because I'm always trying to find ways to improve myself in order to be able to "stretch" farther out in life. With 18 units, 25 hours of work, play rehearsals, housekeeping, and family gatherings, life can feel a bit frazzling. A lot of this article is about reducing distractions. The article states that an open floor plan makes it hard to accomplish things, as do multi-tasking, not getting enough sleep, technology, and not supplementing yourself with the proper products and activities to engage the brain. All of these are work related issues but this translates easily to college life as well. Students should keep these factors in mind!

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NME Blogs | The Science Of Music - Why Do Songs In A Minor Key Sound Sad?

NME Blogs | The Science Of Music - Why Do Songs In A Minor Key Sound Sad? | Here and Now | Scoop.it

Via Andrew McCluskey
Alex Cowans's insight:

I found this article very interesting because I have always wondered why major toned usually meant happy and minor toned usually meant sad. I wasn't surprised by the preliminary results that explained that because we grew up listening to  music and being  taught that major means happy and minor means sad. What I was surprised about was the secondary result which said that the nature of our music due to our own human speech tones and timbres when we are happy/sad. I was interested in the recent development that more music is in a minor key but we as a culture are not necessarily less happy. Very informative! I'm very happy to have came across this article! 

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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, February 27, 2014 1:49 PM

A piece for NME by one of my favorite music scientists Dr. Vicky Williamson - and the answer to the question is culture - with a little bit of physics thrown in.  Interesting to read the NPR link that western pop may be moving away from predominately major music; perhaps future generations won't feel the association quite so much!  Oh - and you haven't yet experienced Losing My Religion in a major key - the track is embedded on the page - definitely worth a listen!

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Millennials more altruistic than you might think

Millennials more altruistic than you might think | Here and Now | Scoop.it

"Today’s young adults born after 1980, known as Generation Y or the millennial generation, are the most educated generation in American history and, like the baby boomers, one of the largest. Yet since the Great Recession of 2008, they have been having a hard time. They are facing one of the worst job markets in decades. They are in debt. Many of them are unemployed. The income gap between old and young Americans is widening. To give you a sense of their lot, when you search 'are millennials' in Google, the search options that come up include: 'are millennials selfish,' 'are millennials lazy,' and 'are millennials narcissistic.'"

 

Read more: http://nyti.ms/1bS7oWb

 

[via NY Times]


Via University of San Francisco, Digitives, Marylene Delbourg-Delphis
Alex Cowans's insight:

I found this article very interesting because it rang true to what us as Millennials believe. I have many friends and acquaintances who are following a career path not for the money but rather for the meaning behind it. I have friends who are nursing majors because they like helping people. As a performing arts major, I along with my peers, strive to be successful not for money or fame, but because we as performers have the ability to touch and inspire people with our work. Millennials commonly find meaning by interacting with and benefiting others rather than how much money we've made or who we've beaten out to get to where we are today.

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