Herbs, Medicine and Nutrigenomics
20 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Victoria Auyeung from Natural Products Chemistry Breaking News
Scoop.it!

A systems approach to traditional oriental medicine : Nature Biotechnology

A systems approach to traditional oriental medicine : Nature Biotechnology | Herbs, Medicine and Nutrigenomics | Scoop.it
Analyzing structural similarities between compounds derived from traditional oriental medicine and human metabolites is a systems-based approach that can help identify mechanisms of action and suggest approaches to reduce toxicity.

 

Hyun Uk Kim,Jae Yong Ryu,Jong Ok Lee& Sang Yup LeeAffiliationsCorresponding authorNature Biotechnology33,264–268(2015)doi:10.1038/nbt.3167


Via NatProdChem
more...
NatProdChem's curator insight, March 28, 2015 12:04 PM

Looking at the big picture !

Scooped by Victoria Auyeung
Scoop.it!

Bitter pill for traditional Chinese medicine - Business - China Daily Asia

Bitter pill for traditional Chinese medicine - Business - China Daily Asia | Herbs, Medicine and Nutrigenomics | Scoop.it
New quality and safety rules may stifle sales prospects of TCM in the European market, as Zhang Chunyan reports in London. In London’s Chinatown, a poster in Chinese urges customers to stock up on traditional and other patent Chinese medicines before an impending ban on patented TCM products from next year.
Victoria Auyeung's insight:

Stringent safety policies and scant literature are hindering the use of TCM in the West. Even so, TCM's potential to treat disease is still too great to dismiss. What to do in this apparent stalemate?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Victoria Auyeung from Health & Life Extension
Scoop.it!

Explainer: what is nutrigenomics?

Explainer: what is nutrigenomics? | Herbs, Medicine and Nutrigenomics | Scoop.it
The field of nutrigenomics studies how different foods have an impact on our genome and how that can modify our biology to promote healthiness or disease.

Via Tonya Scholz
Victoria Auyeung's insight:

The phrase 'You are what you eat' has been kicking around for a while, but only recently has science started to gain insight into how we're affected at the genetic level.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victoria Auyeung
Scoop.it!

Wheat Gluten Confirmed to Promote Weight Gain - The Epoch Times

Wheat Gluten Confirmed to Promote Weight Gain - The Epoch Times | Herbs, Medicine and Nutrigenomics | Scoop.it
Examiner.com Wheat Gluten Confirmed to Promote Weight Gain The Epoch Times We interpret this to mean that the weight gain associated with wheat consumption has little to do with caloric content per se; rather, the gluten proteins (and likely wheat...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victoria Auyeung
Scoop.it!

BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine | Full text | Histone modifications and traditional Chinese medicinals

Chromatin, residing in the nuclei of eukaryotic cells, comprises DNA and histones to make up chromosomes. Chromatin condenses to compact the chromosomes and loosens to facilitate gene transcription and DNA replication/repair.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victoria Auyeung
Scoop.it!

More bad science in the service of anti-GMO activism « Science-Based Medicine

More bad science in the service of anti-GMO activism « Science-Based Medicine | Herbs, Medicine and Nutrigenomics | Scoop.it
I never used to write much about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) before. I still don't do it that often. For whatever reason, it just hasn't been on my...
Victoria Auyeung's insight:

In response to recent claims that GMO wheat can silence genes, and that this affect can *kill your children and pass down generations*. These claims do NOT have solid foundations and should not be taken seriously.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victoria Auyeung
Scoop.it!

Antioxidants Can Make Cancers Worse | IFLScience

Antioxidants Can Make Cancers Worse | IFLScience | Herbs, Medicine and Nutrigenomics | Scoop.it
While many proponents of dietary antioxidants or supplements will claim they have incredible anticancer properties, amongst other things, the literature on these molecules is conflicting and animal and human studies of antioxidants as a potential cancer therapy have been largely disappointing. In fact, some trials have even found that antioxidant supplements can worsen some cancers. For example, vitamin E increases cancer burden and mortality in mouse models of lung cancer.
Victoria Auyeung's insight:

Again, a case in point of how biology is not as intuitive as we tend to think.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Victoria Auyeung from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

International Consortium Builds ‘Google Map’ of Human Metabolism

International Consortium Builds ‘Google Map’ of Human Metabolism | Herbs, Medicine and Nutrigenomics | Scoop.it

Building on earlier pioneering work by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, an international consortium of university researchers has produced the most comprehensive virtual reconstruction of human metabolism to date. Scientists could use the model, known as Recon 2, to identify causes of and new treatments for diseases like cancer, diabetes and even psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Each person’s metabolism, which represents the conversion of food sources into energy and the assembly of molecules, is determined by genetics, environment and nutrition.

 

Doctors have long recognized the importance of metabolic imbalances as an underlying cause of disease, but scientists have been ramping up their research on the connection as a result of compelling evidence enabled by the Human Genome Project and advances in systems biology, which leverages the power of high-powered computing to build vast interactive databases of biological information.

 

“Recon 2 allows biomedical researchers to study the human metabolic network with more precision than was ever previously possible. This is essential to understanding where and how specific metabolic pathways go off track to create disease,” said Bernhard Palsson, Galletti Professor of Bioengineering at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering.

 

“It’s like having the coordinates of all the cars in town, but no street map. Without this tool, we don’t know why people are moving the way they are,” said Palsson. He likened Recon 2 to Google mapping for its ability to merge complex details into a single, interactive map. For example, researchers looking at how metabolism sets the stage for cancerous tumor growth could zoom in on the “map” for finely detailed images of individual metabolic reactions or zoom out to look at patterns and relationships among pathways or different sectors of metabolism. This is not unlike how you can get a street view of a single house or zoom out to see how the house fits into the whole neighborhood, city, state, country and globe.  And just as Google maps brings together a broad set of data – such as images, addresses, streets and traffic flow – into an easily navigated tool, Recon 2 pulls together a vast compendium of data from published literature and existing models of metabolic processes.

 

Recon 2 is already proving its utility, according to Ines Thiele, a professor at the University of Iceland and UC San Diego alumna, who led the Recon 2 effort. Thiele earned her Ph.D. in bioinformatics as a student of Palsson’s and was part of the original Recon 1 team.

 

Thiele said Recon 2 has successfully predicted alterations in metabolism that are currently used to diagnose certain inherited metabolic diseases.

“The use of this foundational resource will undoubtedly lead to a myriad of exciting predictions that will accelerate the translation of basic experimental results into clinical applications,” said Thiele. “Ultimately, I envision it being used to personalize diagnosis and treatment to meet the needs of individual patients. In the future, this capability could enable doctors to develop virtual models of their patients’ individual metabolic networks and identify the most efficacious treatment for various diseases including diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.”

 

As much as Recon 2 marks a significant improvement over Recon 1, there is still much work to be done, according to the research team. Thiele said Recon 2 accounts for almost 1,800 genes of an estimated 20,000 protein-coding genes in the human genome. “Clearly, further community effort t will be required to capture chemical interactions with and between the rest of the genome,” she said.  

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Victoria Auyeung's insight:

Look forward to a future in which we can use the human metabolic network to predict how our diets may affect our health? I certainly do!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Victoria Auyeung from MycorWeb Plant-Microbe Interactions
Scoop.it!

Diet rapidly and reproducibly alters the human gut microbiome

Diet rapidly and reproducibly alters the human gut microbiome | Herbs, Medicine and Nutrigenomics | Scoop.it
Long-term dietary intake influences the structure and activity of the trillions of microorganisms residing in the human gut, but it remains unclear how rapidly and reproducibly the human gut microbiome responds to short-term macronutrient change.

Via Francis Martin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victoria Auyeung
Scoop.it!

Epigenetics in Traditional Chinese Pharmacy: A Bioinformatic Study at Pharmacopoeia Scale

Epigenetics in Traditional Chinese Pharmacy: A Bioinformatic Study at Pharmacopoeia Scale | Herbs, Medicine and Nutrigenomics | Scoop.it
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is an international, peer-reviewed journal that seeks to understand the sources and to encourage rigorous research in this new, yet ancient world of complementary and alternative medicine.
Victoria Auyeung's insight:

"Over a third of herbal medicines...alter our genes or alter enzymes that alter our genetic material" - Case Adams, Herbal Medicine Alters Genes, Cell Mitosis and Epigenome (6/11/2013)

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victoria Auyeung
Scoop.it!

The Working of Herbs: Did Herbal Recipe Ingredients Really Work? |

The Working of Herbs: Did Herbal Recipe Ingredients Really Work? | | Herbs, Medicine and Nutrigenomics | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.