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Patient Advocates Attend American Academy of Nurse Practitioners ...

Patient Advocates Attend American Academy of Nurse Practitioners ... | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it
Here is a guest post written by Kelly Young about her experience at the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners Conference.
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CBO: Health care reform saves money - Examiner.com

CBO: Health care reform saves money - Examiner.com | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it
Examiner.comCBO: Health care reform saves moneyExaminer.comThe Congressional Budget Office released an analysis yesterday of the Affordable Care Act saying that the House repeal bill would actually increase the deficit by $109 billion and, as a result...
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Don’t Get Hit With Fines Under Health Care Reform

Don’t Get Hit With Fines Under Health Care Reform | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it
Of the 500 provisions in health-care reform, more than 40 of these provisions affect the Internal Revenue Code, including incentives and tax breaks to individuals and small businesses to offset health-care expenses.
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Key technologies driving healthcare

Key technologies driving healthcare | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it
We are witnessing a shift in the health sector to the seamless provision of healthcare. Many elements are coming together, such as more cost-efficient care delivery, intelligent analysis of patient information, more price-conscious and scalable software delivery models, and new methods of interaction between individuals and caregivers using mobile devices and social media in a way that has not been known before.

 

This is changing the fabric of healthcare and leading to a paradigm shift – it is no longer just about healing the sick. With more information becoming available, it is now also about prevention. More fundamentally, healthcare is moving from episodic, isolated patient care towards electronic health record-centric or patient-centred care, where the entire continuum of care is not just involved but also accountable for the patient outcome. To this end, healthcare is increasingly using intelligent tools to obtain smarter clinical information to improve patient outcomes.

 

source: http://www.computerweekly.com/feature/Key-technologies-driving-healthcare

 


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Dodging Medicare's Hidden Traps: Know the basics

Dodging Medicare's Hidden Traps: Know the basics | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it

The Medicare website https://www.medicare.gov/default.aspx

provides the details, but it contains so much information that it can be difficult to navigate. Here is the very least you need to know.

 

Medicare Basics

Part A,  =>  no premium, is hospital insurance. has a deductible of $1,156 that covers hospital stays up to 60 days, copayments of $289/ day for days 61-90, and copayments of $578 a day for days 91-150 days.

 

Part B => optional insurance that covers doctors' bills, labs & outpatient care. The basic premium is $99.90/ month (can be as high as $319.70 for an individual earning > $214,000 annually), and deductible is $140/ year. Copays are 20% of Medicare-approved amounts.

 

Part D,  => covers prescription drugs, has a monthly base premium of $32.34 (high-income consumers pay more), in addition to a premium which varies by a plan. Copayments and deductibles also vary by plan.

 

If you receive Social Security, you will be enrolled automatically in parts A & B when you turn 65. If you aren't yet receiving Social Security, you have to apply for Medicare, (can do online)

 

The enrollment period for Part B and D begins three months before you turn 65 and lasts seven months. If you miss this enrollment window, your coverage will be delayed and your premiums will be higher.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Personalized Medicine Will Transform Healthcare

Personalized Medicine Will Transform Healthcare | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it

As healthcare providers incorporate deep analytics and advanced clinical decision support into everyday practice, they'll turn standardized medicine into personalized medicine.

 

Thought leaders in academic medicine have been pushing hospitals and medical practices to adhere more closely to evidence-based clinical guidelines, which some call standardized medicine. But many docs in the trenches complain that when it comes to patient care, the one-size-fits-all rule just doesn't work.


And for good reason. When you work day after day with patients, you quickly realize that while the results of large-scale, randomized clinical trials may apply to the population as a whole, they don't apply to every individual member. That's what makes personalized medicine is so exciting.

 

Personalized medicine's goal is to use a patient's genetic makeup, lifestyle, age, gender, and environment to provide a tailored treatment regimen. And information technology is playing a pivotal role in making that goal a reality.


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Transformational and Disruptive Changes Are Coming to the Delivery System

Transformational and Disruptive Changes Are Coming to the Delivery System | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it
More chronic illnesses, more diseases of old age, consumers demanding more quality and safety, physicians no longer in typical private practice, and high deductible health care polices are each about to cause major changes in the practice of medicine and how it is delivered to patients. Will this come about smoothly or, more likely, with some serious hand wringing?

 

Health care delivery will change substantially in the coming years. This is not because of reform but rather due to a set of drivers that are exerting a great push and pull to the delivery system. Some of these changes will be quite transformational and some will be very disruptive of the status quo. What are these drivers?


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Meet the Nurse

Meet the Nurse | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it
It's not necessarily the “latest” news, however it's certainly worth sharing on Innovative Nurse. I was just talking to a patient's family about the role of a nurse practitioner and how they are being utilized in primary care.
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Health-Care Reform and the Next Recession

Health-Care Reform and the Next Recession | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it
The Motley Fool - Millions of jobs could be under siege. (RT @TMFBiggles: Remember my healthcare job bubble piece?
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Champions of Change « Johns Hopkins Nursing Magazine

Champions of Change « Johns Hopkins Nursing Magazine | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it
Dell and the other health policy students joined nurses from across Maryland to speak with representatives about a bill to increase penalties for patients or family members who are violent toward their healthcare practitioners.
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44,000 uninsured Massachusetts residents paid penalty in 2010

44,000 uninsured Massachusetts residents paid penalty in 2010 | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it

Take Home Message: Since Massachusetts is the state laboratory for the national health insurance program (ACA) and its pesonal mandate for insurance, its encouraging to see that the small penalty ($406/yr) MAY play a role as an incentive to encourage more citizens to become insured through the state insurance exchanges ***************************************** About 67,000 people were fined for not having coverage in 2007, the first year of the penalty. That figure dropped to 44,000 in 2010, according to a state report. Since the recession, the state has waived the fine for more people on the grounds that they could not afford health plans available to them, accounting for ome of the decline.
More than half of those who paid the tax penalty were uninsured for the full year, the ­report said. Most were under age 40.


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U.S.hospitals are scrambling to reduce readmission

U.S.hospitals are scrambling to reduce readmission | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it

Take home message:  Prevention of readmission is good for everyone.  Strategies to reduce readmission involve communication with patients and hosptial & outpatient providers to continue to coordinate care.  These 10 strategies are common sense approaches, but may not be implemented because of cost constraints hosptials are now under.

================================

Hospitals will be penalized for high 30-day readmission and pneumonia in October. By 2014, hospitals with high rates could lose up to 3% of regular reimbursement.

88% of hospitals have implemented some  practices recommended to reduce preventable readmissions in heart failure and acute MI, but only 12% used eight or more and just 3% used all. The overall average was 4.8.

Here is how the 10 measures are used:

1. Universal tracking of 30-day readmission rate (95%).

2. Setting quality improvement teams to tackle preventable readmissions, (CHF & acute MI)  (87%) 

3. Medication management efforts at discharge, including providing patient education about the purpose of each medication and any changes to their medication list (77%)

4. Patients or caregivers receive an emergency plan (65%)
5.  Regularly called patients after discharge to follow-up (63%)
6.  Usually had patients leave with an outpatient follow-up appointment already arranged (54%)
7.  Monitored how amount of patients with follow-up appointments within 7 days of discharge (32%)
8.  Always sent discharge summary directly to PCP within 48 hours  (26%)
9.   Pharmacy technician primarily responsible for obtaining medication history as part of medication reconciliation process (23%)
10.  Pharmacist usually responsible for conducting medication reconciliation at discharge (10%)


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Marked Variation in Angioplasty (#PCI) Prices in California

Marked Variation in Angioplasty (#PCI) Prices in California | health care reform and nurse practitioners | Scoop.it

Prices for the same surgical procedure can be four times higher, depending on where the hospital is located - even if it's in the same city. And often for reasons that are not easily apparent.

For example, hospitals in the San Mateo area charged a median price of $48,000 for a cesarean section in 2010; in San Diego, the same procedure was priced at $20,000. A hip replacement in Alameda County: $133,000; Orange County: $58,000.

Angioplasty
-- Alameda County: $97,000

-- Palm Springs: $87,000

-- Santa Barbara: $19,000

In California, total health care spending in 2009 stood at $230 billion. Hospital costs, at $76.6 billion, account for the biggest slice. In the past 10 years, health care costs in the Golden State have risen 80 percent, and they're still rising.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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