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How the Heart is Like a 'Little Brain': Which Is Really in Control? - The Epoch Times

How the Heart is Like a 'Little Brain': Which Is Really in Control? - The Epoch Times | heart | Scoop.it
How the Heart is Like a 'Little Brain': Which Is Really in Control?
The Epoch Times
“There is a brain in the heart, metaphorically speaking,” said Dr.
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The Next Frontier in Heart Care - Wall Street Journal

The Next Frontier in Heart Care - Wall Street Journal | heart | Scoop.it
The Next Frontier in Heart Care
Wall Street Journal
Two influential heart studies are joining forces to bring the power of genetics and other 21st century tools to battle against heart disease and stroke.
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Heart attack chest pain similar for men and women - NBCNews.com

Heart attack chest pain similar for men and women - NBCNews.com | heart | Scoop.it
New York Times (blog) Heart attack chest pain similar for men and women NBCNews.com A European study found that the symptoms of chest pain experienced by women and men during the early stages of a heart attack (formally called acute myocardial...
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Eat a Healthy Diet and Drink Wisely to Postpone Dying If You Survived a Myocardial Infarction

Eat a Healthy Diet and Drink Wisely to Postpone Dying If You Survived a Myocardial Infarction | heart | Scoop.it

The Mediterranean diet as the most likely dietary model to provide protection against CHD.  Increasing adherence to the Mediterranean diet has been consistently beneficial for prevention of major chronic diseases, including fatal and nonfatal CHD, as well as all-cause mortality.

 In 4098 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study who survived an initial MI.  average dietary quality improved only marginally post-MI among the highly educated health professionals

Nevertheless, for participants who increased the diet/nutrition score, there was a 29% reduction in all-cause mortality and a 40% reduction in cardiovascular mortality. The AHEI2010 diet score used includes 11 components: vegetables, fruits, nuts and legumes, red meat and processed meats, sugar-sweetened beverages, alcohol, polyunsaturated fat, trans fat, omega-3 fat, whole grains, and sodium intake.

Many of the recommendations regarding these foods and nutrients are similar to the traditional Mediterranean diet: high consumption of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables; substantial intake of protein from plant sources (nuts and legumes); moderate intake of polyunsaturated fat; fish as a source of omega-3 fatty acids; and alcohol; and a low consumption of trans fat, meat and meat products, and sugar-sweetened beverages.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, November 25, 2013 5:02 PM

From the Editorial: Patients who survive an MI are likely to receive up-to-date medical care, including cardiac rehabilitation, antiplatelet therapy, statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and β-blockers. These interventions reduce the chances of a second MI, but a sizable residual risk  persists. The message from this study is that MI survivors should eat a healthy diet and drink wisely to further reduce the risk of subsequent cardiovascular death or simply postpone dying.