Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living
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Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living
We are inundated with unhealthy processed foods, fast foods, and soft drinks. Let's turn this deplorable state of affairs around together, for a healthy you!
Curated by Steve Kingsley
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Mothers admit they are failing to give their families a healthy diet as it is revealed that less than a third feed their children the recommended five-a-day

Mothers admit they are failing to give their families a healthy diet as it is revealed that less than a third feed their children the recommended five-a-day | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
The survey suggests that people are finding it difficult to eat healthily with only 21 per cent of people interviewed agreeing they always eat enough fresh vegetables.

Via britishroses
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Even the recommended "healthy diet" is not optimal, to say the least, but it is admittedly better than current eating habits!

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Too much of a good thing? Antioxidants and the cardiovascular benefits of exercise.

Too much of a good thing? Antioxidants and the cardiovascular benefits of exercise. | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
FoodFacts.com has always included information in our blog posts about the benefits of the antioxidants found in natural, fresh fruits and vegetables. There have

Via foodfacts
Steve Kingsley's insight:

The age old roman saying comes to mind: "Everything in moderation" except love - that's added by me.

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foodfacts's curator insight, July 25, 2013 11:58 AM

Could too much of a good thing actually be detrimental to our health? New studies on the interaction between antioxidants and exercise prove that this may be true. 

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How to eat an apple. Odds are you've been doing it all wrong your entire life!

How to eat an apple. Odds are you've been doing it all wrong your entire life! | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
The traditional method of eating an apple is strewn with waste and Foodbeast set about uncovering the best way to eat an apple with a surprising result.

Via Gourmet Guys
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Who would have though?

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Healthy Lunch Box Ideas to Make Your Colleagues Envious! - Lifespan Fitness Blog

Healthy Lunch Box Ideas to Make Your Colleagues Envious! - Lifespan Fitness Blog | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
Whilst we all advance in life, leaving behind childhood friends and education; one thing remains consistent – the ever present lunchbox – only; this time, mum’s at her place, and we’re left with the tedious task of packing!

Via Lifespan Fitness, Barry Kay
Steve Kingsley's insight:

With Mom not around you can actually use these ideas to make your lunch healthy - never mind your colleauges!

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Go Gluten Free ? Most People Shouldn ' t ( Op - Ed ) - LiveScience.com

Go Gluten Free ? Most People Shouldn ' t ( Op - Ed ) - LiveScience.com | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
Go Gluten Free ? Most People Shouldn ' t ( Op - Ed )
LiveScience.com
It's all the rage right now; in fact, you may be thinking of going on a gluten-free diet yourself. Before you do, here are some things to think about.

Via Edible News
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Is there an easy and inexpensive test kit to determine at home if one has celiac disease?

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Edible News's curator insight, June 30, 2013 10:33 AM

A healthy diet and lifestyle for celiacs and gluten sensitive...

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Edible Beauty: Graphic Cakes and Ghetto Pops

Edible Beauty: Graphic Cakes and Ghetto Pops | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it

A book devoted to unique, graphic, and beautiful cakes... A collection of amalgamations straight custom from designer...


Via Edible News
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The title is certainly graphic!

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Fast Food, Fat Profits: Obesity in America

Fast Food, Fat Profits: Obesity in America | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it

Obesity in America has reached a crisis point. Two out of every three Americans are overweight, one out of every three is obese. One in three are expected to have diabetes by 2050.
Minorities have been even more profoundly affected. African-Americans have a 50 per cent higher prevalence of obesity and Hispanics 25 per cent higher when compared with whites.
How did the situation get so out of hand? Josh Rushing explores the world of cheap food for Americans living at the margins.
What opportunities do people have to eat healthy? Who is responsible for food deserts and processed food in American schools?
Watch the full documentary now


Via Sigalon
Steve Kingsley's insight:

I disagree. Cheap/fast foods are not the culprits. We cook at home with  healthy foods, veggies, and other ingredients and it costs LESS - actually MUCH LESS - as we are slim and so healthy we haven't seen a doctor in years.

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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, July 20, 2013 8:46 PM

I disagree. Cheap/fast foods are not the culprits. We cook at home with  healthy foods, veggies, and other ingredients and it costs LESS - actually MUCH LESS - as we are slim and so healthy we haven't seen a doctor in years.

Annette Ferri's curator insight, July 23, 2013 12:29 AM

Obesity and diabetes is on the rise because of hidden toxic chemicals in food and the disgusting way things are grown and manufactured. This epidemic will continue unless people choose organic.

Steve Kingsley's comment, July 27, 2013 12:30 PM
I disagree again... obesity and diabetes are due to: 1) The loss of self-control; 2) Most people choosing junk food EVEN when healthy foods are around.
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It’s Raining Organic

It’s Raining Organic | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it

Trends: With a growing awareness of the benefits of making organic a way of life, most localities in Bangalore now boast an organic store, sometimes even more than one, finds Bhumika K.

It’s there in your vegetables, it’s there in your spices, your tea, even in your sambar powder. It’s in your jam, dal, millet-bread, atta…it’s in your clothes too. But more than ever it’s on your mind. And it’s a word called ‘organic’ that’s becoming a whole new way of life — of benefitting from going back to your roots.

Bangalore is seeing a quick sprouting of organic stores, not just in its large shopping hubs, but also in smaller localities and neighbourhoods. A lot more people seem to be catching on to the organic mantra each day, and as word spreads, and demand increases, there’s a store at an arm’s reach for most people in the city. In late 2012, International Competence Centre for Organic Agriculture (ICCOA) stated that Bangalore had 68 retail shops selling organic produce — including dedicated outlets as well as those which have sizeable space earmarked for organic produce. See any supermarket and you will be sure to find a section dedicated to organic. Even online stores have a separate section of organic products.

While earlier, people only had a Namdhari’s Fresh to turn to for organic veggies, now a lot more effort is going into making daily living as natural and therefore as healthy as possible, turning life safe and chemical-free, leaving a minimal carbon footprint, about caring for the earth that gives you so much. So much so that most daily usage products are turning organic — from milk and meat, to washing powders and floor cleaners. Smart entrepreneurs are using organic ingredients to make readymade food mixes — an organic imagination has taken wing and there’s no end to creatively exploring possibilities of what comes out of the organic magic-bag.

 

“A lot more people are making organic a part of their routine — they know it’s good for them and the planet,” confirms Ami Patel, category head-home, Mother Earth. At their Domlur store, where they have stocked organic products since 2009, food, specially staples, are pretty popular. “Some regular clientele buy their monthly groceries from us, while many others look for specifics.” They have a range of around 200 food products, but they have around 100 non-food products, including house cleaning and personal care items like lotions and shampoos. It’s a slowly, but steadily catching up trend. Vijay Grover, co-founder of Bangalore Organic Store, talks of how they have now diversified into organic clothing, specially innerwear. “People with allergies seem to prefer organic clothing. We have also begun to stock t-shirts,” he says. They initially set up an online-only store. But the demand was such that they had to open up a retail nook as well in Cox Town.

“We realised there is a demand here in Bangalore, among the IT crowd. The younger generation, specially pregnant women and young mothers, are willing to spend on organic products. So we concentrated a lot on baby food and oatmeal,” says Grover. He also points to another trend in the organic market: “People are willing to pay more for branded products because they are certified organic, rather than unbranded, though we source from trusted growers.” People are also suspicious of adulteration in cooking oils, and so cold-pressed organic cooking oils have caught people’s imagination, he offers. A lot of new customers come looking for organic foods, based on a dietician’s recommendations.

Ridhima Peravali, who works for a non-profit organisation, has been in Bangalore two years. She used organic products even while she lived in the U.S.A for three years. “Earlier I shopped at Era Organics near my home in Dollar’s Colony and now I shop at Buffalo Back in Malleswaram, which is on my way back from my workplace. The only thing I find difficult to find on a consistent basis here in India is organic vegetables. They are available only select days a week, and there is actually a queue for them!” Her parents come from an agricultural family in Bihar and they were aware of what kind of pesticides go into crops; she also buys organic sugar because it’s sulphur-free. “Moreover, in India, organic products cost only 1.5 times more than non-organic, while in the West, prices are almost thrice as much.”

The reasons for consumers to go organic may be many. Manjunath Pankkaparambil, owner of Lumiere, an organic restaurant and store in Marathahalli, gives credit to Aamir Khan’s episode on organic food in the Satyameva Jayate TV series, as well as events like BioFach organic exhibitions, in raising consumer awareness about the advantages of consuming organic. “It is not just fashionable to be organic, people are understanding it.” There are many newcomers each day at his store who come on friends’ recommendations. Manjunath says a lot of older customers have the time to understand the concept of organic and have tasted the goodness of it before. Apart from fresh vegetables grown on their own organic farm, Lumiere also sells organic chicken and eggs from their organic poultry farm. They also take orders online — about 50 people order over the weekend.

The Jaivik Krishik Society runs perhaps what is one of the oldest outlets in the city selling organic (since 2006) — surprisingly, it’s a state-run enterprise. It’s an offspring of the State’s horticulture department, with a supply network of over 300 farmers. It also has the advantageous location of being in Lal Bagh. Harish, senior manager at the Jaivik Mall, says their footfalls total 50 every day, mostly from the early morning walkers in the park. “We have a whole variety of rice, wheat, dals, millets and pulses grown all over Karnataka. On Friday and Saturday we have vegetables too. Because it’s grown locally and we purchase directly from farmers, our products are priced much lesser than other branded ones. Yet, new customers ask us why organic is priced so high. But they are convinced when we tell them about the way yield drops when a farmer starts organic cultivation, and how much more effort it takes to raise such a crop.”

 


Via Giri Kumar
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It’s Raining Organic - in India too!
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Susan Sharma's curator insight, March 1, 2014 1:09 AM

Grow your own vegetables organically in your backyard or balcony.   There can be no better certificate for the organic food you consume from your own produce.

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Low-Fat Diet and Avoidance of Vitamin D - Two Health Recommendations You’re Best Off Rejecting

Low-Fat Diet and Avoidance of Vitamin D - Two Health Recommendations You’re Best Off Rejecting | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it

By Dr. Mercola While there are many variations of the Mediterranean diet, its primary hallmark is whole, minimally processed foods.


Via Jolly Green Jane
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Trans-fat and deep-fry free diets are healthy. Taking 1,000 units of Vitamin D a day was proven to prevent and cure cancer in Canadian study conducted with over 22,000 people.

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Organic Growing and Gardening

Organic Growing and Gardening | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
Want to Produce Your Own Organic Food? Read on... sponsored http://t.co/MZg6K4uiKQ

Via Natalia Corres
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The Foodshed Project digital stories are online! - Community of ...

The Foodshed Project digital stories are online! http://vimeo.com/channels/foodshed Storytelling plays a central role in the building of environmental and social justice movements. In The Foodshed Project, digital storytelling is ...


Via Petra Pollum
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Storytelling plays a central role in any movement, family life, etc....

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Building a Garden that Builds Soil | Modern Alternative Kitchen

Building a Garden that Builds Soil | Modern Alternative Kitchen | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it

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Because a healthy soil is a healthy household!

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Kitchen Designs with Personality

Kitchen Designs with Personality | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
Inject your personality into a modern kitchen design with open shelving and artwork.

Via Patrice Gerber
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Easy to keep clean too!

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No-Bake Strawberry Lemonade Bites

No-Bake Strawberry Lemonade Bites | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it

“What are your favorite ingredients to cook and bake with in the summer? For me, it’s fresh, colorful fruits and vegetables like strawberries, zucchini, lemon and bell peppers. I do much more stovetop cooking than hot-oven baking in the summer, though, since firing up my oven during Austin’s scorching summers is low on my list. But with these no-bake bites, I can make my dessert and enjoy it without breaking a sweat!”


Via The New Media Moguls
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Tempting....!

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How to Can Fresh Vegetables (Infographic)

How to Can Fresh Vegetables (Infographic) | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
Growing up in the country, we always had a large garden.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Just make sure if the recipe calls for sugar you replace it with healthy alternatives like Sugarlesse:  http://sugarlesse.com

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"Kitchen Rap " with Louis S. Luzzo, Sr.: Molecular Gastronomy, The Science of Food

"Kitchen Rap " with Louis S. Luzzo, Sr.: Molecular Gastronomy, The Science of Food | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
While watching Iron Chef a few weeks ago, I was intrigued by this particular battle. The ingredient was much less of interest to me than was the complete polar opposite applications applied to it. It was old school classic French technique vs. a complete application of molecular gastronomy. For example, both chefs decided on an ice cream dish, yet while one took the traditional route, classic ingredients put into an actual ice cream maker, the other made an instant ice cream using injected CO'2 and nitrogen. While both presentations were well received by the judges, regardless of the diametrically opposed directions from which they came, it got me thinking. Old school time tested traditional and classic French techniques vs. the 'new garde' and the advanced science of food. This was something that has fascinated me and a subject I needed to explore. So here we are.

Via Ashish Umre
Steve Kingsley's insight:

"Industry Rap:" 20 some years ago practitioners of the art were called food scientists and made a decent living; today they are called "molecular gastronomists" doing the same thing and making a very good living. It's called "title inflation." As a serial food inventor I'm not jelaous, just sick and tired of the aggrandisement and cheapening of values and language.

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5 things you should know about gluten

5 things you should know about gluten | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
Editor's note: Dr. Arthur Agatston is the medical director of wellness and prevention for Baptist Health South Florida.

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Healthy chocolate? The growing evidence for cocoa flavanols

Healthy chocolate? The growing evidence for cocoa flavanols | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
The meteoric emergence of cocoa flavanols as the new 'super ingredient' continues, with many new scientific publications focused on the potential health effects of these special compounds.

Via Edible News
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Here is some additional information, known for decades about epicathetin and flavanols in cocoa:  http://www.caffex.com/ChocoMallows_c_17.html

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Edible News's curator insight, June 26, 2013 11:03 AM

great potential for cocoa flavonoids to positively impact our health...

Dion Taylor's curator insight, July 29, 2013 9:05 AM

Raw Cacao, God's gift to mankind...with super healing atioxidantial properties and flavanols (nitric oxide)...a/k/a really good stuff...found in our Cacao-Incan Berry Biscotti and our Banana-Walnut Granola...eat yourself to good health, it's ok, we've got your back!

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“Food Deserts” in Canadian Cities Prevent Revitalization

“Food Deserts” in Canadian Cities Prevent Revitalization | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
Efforts to attract affluent residents to live in new downtown redevelopment projects are being hampered by a lack of basic amenities - most notable of which is access to grocery stores within walking distance.

“Food deserts” are urban areas with limited access to healthy and affordable foods. Initial research has identified serious food deserts in Saskatoon, Kingston and London, while cities such as Edmonton and Montreal were found to have generally good food access. Food deserts are often tied to low socio-economic income status and are associated with a variety of diet-related health problems.


Via Lauren Moss
Steve Kingsley's insight:

No "food deserts" if you are willing to cook at home....

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Organics and Sustainability: Reflections on my New York Times Misquote

Organics and Sustainability: Reflections on my New York Times Misquote | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
a friend in New York City contacted me on New Year’s Eve to tell me I had been quoted in a front page story. It dealt with important questions about the sustainability of growing organic vegetables in the deserts of Mexico’s Baja peninsula.

 

 

Organics and Sustainability: Reflections on my New York Times Misquote

Posted Jan 24, 2012 by Michael Bomford

The phone rang as I was tying up loose ends for my last day in the office before Christmas. New York Times reporter Elisabeth Rosenthal wanted my thoughts on the sustainability of organic agriculture… a subject that I think about a lot. I gave her my cell phone number and asked her to call back.

She called again Saturday afternoon, as my kids and I returned home from Christmas shopping. I plunked them in front of a video and put her on speaker phone so that I could peel butternut squash for a solstice potluck that evening. We talked for a half hour or so, and she said she’d let me know when her story would run.

I didn’t hear back from her, but a friend in New York City contacted me on New Year’s Eve to tell me I had been quoted in a front page story. It dealt with important questions about the sustainability of growing organic vegetables in the deserts of Mexico’s Baja peninsula. Apparently it had legs. It was the most e-mailed story in the paper for much of the first week of 2012. It contained some of the ideas that I had discussed as I peeled squash, but only one direct quote from me. My heart sank as I read it:

Organic agriculture used to be sustainable agriculture, but now that is not always the case.

That’s not what I had said. It wasn’t even a statement I could agree with. Yet there it was, immortalized in America’s newspaper of record with my name attached to it.

I immediately fired off the following letter to the editor, which has not been published:

I disagree with the statement attributed to me that “organic agriculture used to be sustainable.” Most organic farms remain more sustainable than their conventional counterparts. If we must import produce from Mexico we should support the farmers there that grow it organically.

US produce imports from Mexico have almost tripled since 1990, driven by growing demand for inexpensive fruit and vegetables out-of-season. Most of this supply comes from conventional farms. Sourcing more of it from organic farms will not solve the important sustainability issues Rosenthal addresses, but it makes things better, not worse.

Despite growth in demand for organic products, less than 1% of farmland in the USA or Mexico is certified organic. Organic farms tend to use energy and water more efficiently than conventional farms. They pollute less. Organic farmers are often healthier, and better able to make a decent living from small, diversified farms, such as those that dominate Mexico’s organic sector. Supporting them promotes sustainability.

I have tried to reconstruct my conversation to figure out Rosenthal could have heard me say something I don’t believe. I was trying to explain that sustainability is not a black and white issue. Scientists disagree on how best to measure it, because it incorporates a broad range of environmental, economic and social considerations. When the term was coined by the Brundtland commission in 1987 it was defined as “meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

It’s an ambitious goal, seldom truly achieved. We live in a world where almost a billion people live in hunger, even as we exhaust the reserves of fossil fuels and other non-renewable resources on which we increasingly depend. We spew carbon, pollute our groundwater with nitrogen and our surface water with phosphorus, and melt the ice at the same poles where our persistent pesticides accumulate. We are failing to meet the needs of the present, even as we compromise the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

Our current way of living is clearly unsustainable, and the food system that supports it can’t be sustained indefinitely either. This concerned Sir Albert Howard, the father of organic agriculture in the west. Seventy years ago Howard was fascinated by the fall of civilizations, which he saw as an inevitable result of unsustainable food systems. He looked to the agriculture of long persistent civilizations – like China and India – for examples of ways to feed ourselves sustainably. The “practices of the Orient” that he held up as examples were built on a foundation of small, diverse, labor-intensive farms integrating animal and crop production. Few inputs were needed because resources were recycled on the farm by composting, to build soils rich in organic matter that retained water and nutrients. “Organic farming” evolved into a shorthand description for the type of agriculture that Howard advocated. The term “sustainable agriculture” showed up years later, and often incorporated similar concepts and ideas.

For many years, organic agriculture – like sustainable agriculture – was defined by principles, rather than specific practices. In his 1981 essay, Solving for Pattern, Wendell Berry called for solutions that solve multiple problems without creating new ones. He used an organic farm as an example, saying that it

is not one that uses certain methods and substances and avoids others; it is a farm whose structure is formed in imitation of the structure of a natural system; it has the integrity, the independence, and the benign dependence of an organism.

Berry concluded on a note of caution:

But we must not forget that those human solutions that we may call organic are not natural. We are talking about organic artifacts, organic only by imitation or analogy. Our ability to make such artifacts depends on virtues that are specifically human: [...] A good solution, then, must be in harmony with good character, cultural value, and moral law.

Organic agriculture,to Berry, was a human attempt at moral agriculture. And people have been known to disagree on questions of morality. While a growing cadre of farmers and eaters found inspiration in Howard, Berry, and other eloquent pioneers of organic agriculture, each had a different interpretation of what actually constituted organic farming. Money complicated things further. Growing consumer demand and premium prices for organic products motivated questionable labeling of “organic” food from farms that clearly violated organic principles. People who bought organic food weren’t always getting what they thought they were buying.

In response, organic certifiers began to emerge. They developed sets of organic standards, identifying acceptable practices based on principles, philosophy and ideals of organic agriculture. Most prohibited the use of synthetic fertilizers or pesticides, for example. Organic certification remained voluntary, however, and different certification agencies had different standards. A person who bought a certified organic product from Kentucky could get something grown in a way that would not be allowed by certifiers in Oregon.

Beginning in 1990, the USDA began to develop a single national standard for organic agriculture. The controversial process took more than a decade, but national organic standards became legally enforceable in 2002. They dictated what methods and substances were allowed for use on organic farms, and they made organic certification mandatory.

Organic agriculture had gone from being a fuzzy concept, based on high ideals but open to dramatically different interpretations in practice, to being a clearly defined set of practices. National organic standards drew a line in the sand, transforming shades of grey into black and white, organic and not organic. A colleague of mine compares being an organic farmer to being pregnant… you either are or you aren’t. There’s no part-way about it.

Sustainable agriculture, meanwhile, remains open to all sorts of different interpretations. Systems and practices can be more or less sustainable. When somebody tells me they don’t farm organically but they farm sustainably I have to ask what they mean by that. Everybody means something different. Even when people agree on the goals of sustainability, they can disagree on how best to accomplish those goals, or measure progress toward them.

This is what I tried to explain to the New York Times reporter as I prepared my squash. Organic agriculture and sustainable agriculture are based on similar principles. They both used to be fuzzy ideas, but that is no longer the case for organic agriculture, which became more cut-and-dried with the introduction of national organic standards. Apparently she heard me say that organic agriculture used to be sustainable, but isn’t always anymore.

This bothers me, because it suggests that I think there was a golden age of sustainable organic agriculture, which is now behind us. The New York Times story uses me to bolster its thesis that growth of the organic sector is compromising sustainability. In fact, I think it’s the other way around: Each farm that transitions to organic agriculture makes our food system a little more sustainable. Choosing an organic product over a similar conventional product is a vote for sustainability.

The New York Times article deals specifically with the problem of aquifer depletion beneath the deserts of Mexico’s Baja peninsula. Conventional agriculture is responsible for most freshwater use globally, and must shoulder much of the blame for the fact that aquifers the world over are being drained faster than they are recharged. This is clearly unsustainable. It’s happening in Mexico, but it’s also happening in California, the Midwestern US, India, China, and the Middle East. Just about every country growing irrigated grain is depleting aquifers to do it.

Groundwater depletion in the regions of the U.S.A., Europe, China and India and the Middle East for the year 2000 (mm/year; clockwise from top‐left). From Wada et al., 2010 (Click image to go to source).

Since some of the farms in the Baja Peninsula are organic, the problem is presented as an example of growth in the organic sector promoting unsustainable practices. Ironically, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization recently released a report called Sustainable Options for Addressing Land and Water Problems that identifies organic farming as part of the solution to such problems. Organic standards don’t regulate irrigation methods or acceptable water sources, but they do promote practices that improve water use efficiency, build soils that retain water, and reduce pollution of remaining water resources. The Mexican organic vegetable farms highlighted in the article happen to use trickle irrigation, which uses up to 75% less water than sprinkler or flood irrigation systems. They aren’t required to do so by organic standards, but the fact that the farmers can fetch a premium for their organic produce may have allowed them to invest in more sustainable technology. Michael O’Gorman, who used to manage an organic farm in Mexico, describes the irrigation practices used by organic farmers in the Baja peninsula as “some of the most inventive and advanced water saving systems in the world.”

O’Gorman offers his own perspective on the particular farms highlighted in the New York Times article:

The group doing all of Del Cabo’s production in the southern end of the peninsula is one of the oldest grower-owned organic cooperatives in the world. It is owned by the same 151 families (average acreage less than 10) that were given ownership by organic farming pioneers in the early 1980s. It was started, and remains, as a social enterprise to give Mexican farmers a dignified alternative to waiting on tables and cleaning any of the nearly 500,000 luxiorious hotel rooms that American and European tourists inhabit daily[...] In fact the reason why organics developed in this part of Mexico is because the big conventional growers had no interest in the small fields that were owned by Mexican families. Del Cabo growers are religious about organics.

Americans like tomatoes. We eat — and import — more of them every year. In 1981 the average American consumed about a pound of tomatoes each month, of which just 3 ounces were imported. Today the average American eats more than a pound and a half of tomatoes monthly, and a half pound of that is imported, mostly from Mexico. Even our American-grown tomatoes are mostly tended by farm laborers from Mexico and other Latin American countries, who often work in indentured servitude to bring us cheap fruit. The brutal environmental and social costs of America’s conventional tomato industry are detailed in Tomatoland (2011), by award-winning investigative journalist Barry Estabrook:

Fields are sprayed with more than one hundred different herbicides and pesticides. Tomatoes are picked hard and green and artificially gassed until their skins acquire a marketable hue. Modern plant breeding has tripled yields, but has also produced fruits with dramatically reduced amounts of calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C, and tomatoes that have fourteen times more sodium than the tomatoes our parents enjoyed. The relentless drive for low costs has fostered a thriving modern-day slave trade in the United States.

Those who tend our crops suffer the health effects of direct exposure to herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and fumigants, whether they are in Mexico or the USA. In the 1990s a team of anthropologists led by Elizabeth Guilette studied effects of pesticides on children from farming families in the Yaqui valley and foothills of northwestern Mexico. Families in the valley used conventional farming practices with numerous pesticide applications; those in the foothills practiced traditional farming without pesticides. Children from conventional farming families in the valley had much poorer motor skills, less endurance, and worse memory than those who grew up in the foothills without pesticides. Evidence of the effects Guilette and her team observed included representative drawings by her four year-old subjects:

Representative drawings of a person by 4-year-old Yaqui children from the valley and foothills of Sonora, Mexico (Guillette, 1998. Click image to go to source). Valley children are exposed to pesticides; those in the foothills are not.

As a father of young children, I find these images heartbreaking. I want to be able to choose healthy foods for my kids without hurting other kids in the process. Thankfully, I can grow my own tomatoes, or rely on local farmers to grow tomatoes for me using low-input season extension technology, for about half the year. If I must have fresh tomatoes in January then I can choose organic to support farmers — wherever they are — who step off the pesticide treadmill. This won’t fix all of the problems of our industrial food system, but it can make it a little more sustainable.

Originally published at Organic Kentucky

 

 


Via Giri Kumar
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Organic farmers, in general, are much better at utilizing sustainable technologies and practices - which unfortunately price their products out of the mass markets.

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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, July 20, 2013 8:35 PM

Organic farmers, in general, are much better at utilizing sustainable technologies and practices - which unfortunately price their products out of the mass markets.

Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from Annie Haven | Haven Brand
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GardenChef.com | For the Pleasure and Education of Growing and Cooking with Organic Edibles

GardenChef.com | For the Pleasure and Education of Growing and Cooking with Organic Edibles | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it

Mushroom Cheesy Strudel


Via Haven Brand | Manure Tea
Steve Kingsley's insight:

This strudel looks easier to make than most of the other strudels I'm familiar with....

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Say Hello to the 100 Trillion Bacteria That Make Up Your Microbiome

Say Hello to the 100 Trillion Bacteria That Make Up Your Microbiome | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
Medicine used to be obsessed with eradicating the tiny bugs that live within us. Now we’re beginning to understand all the ways they keep us healthy.

Via The BioSync Team
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...and the biosphere that interacts with them!

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The BioSync Team's curator insight, May 15, 2013 5:41 PM

From the article:  It is a striking idea that one of the keys to good health may turn out to involve managing our internal fermentation. But absolute control of the process is too much to hope for. It’s a lot more like gardening than governing.

Read More:  http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/19/magazine/say-hello-to-the-100-trillion-bacteria-that-make-up-your-microbiome.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

AnnesHealthyKitchen's comment, May 16, 2013 8:07 AM
We are actually "made of" a lot of bacteria; maintaining our gut flora is essential (the goal is to have more beneficial than harmful bacteria).
lissacoffey's comment, September 12, 2013 7:08 AM
http://www.scoop.it/t/all-about-health-sports-fitness-dietkart
Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from Sustainable Living
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The Best Edible Flowers: Organic Gardening

The Best Edible Flowers: Organic Gardening | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it
Edible flowers add a special touch to salads. And they make wonder edible bouquets too. Try growing Edible flowers in your organic garden. Edible flower arrangements make wonderful gifts, too.

Via Natalia Corres
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Have seen them mostly used in teas for their visual effect, at least in the US.

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Natalia Corres's curator insight, June 12, 2013 12:53 PM

For those of you who moan about "only" growing vegetables...try add edible flowers to your garden.  :-)

Steve Kingsley's comment, June 29, 2013 10:54 AM
Splendid suggestion, Natalia!
Annette Ferri's curator insight, July 13, 2013 2:17 PM

Organic is the only way to go.

Rescooped by Steve Kingsley from Your Food Your Health
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Deep fried foods can cost your health - The Standard Digital News

Deep fried foods can cost your healthThe Standard Digital NewsThese foods also tend to trigger chronic health conditions, including acidity problems and irritable bowel syndrome, writes Joyce Gathu. Different types of fat.

Via Steven Redhead
Steve Kingsley's insight:

Especially the ones that are fried in continuously reused oils!

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Future Innovation: Ingenious and unique concept Tree Kitchen

Future Innovation: Ingenious and unique concept Tree Kitchen | Healthy Recipes and Tips for Healthy Living | Scoop.it

Amazing Tree Kitchen will become the heart of homes. The modern day kitchen will comprise of an induction cooker with touch pad control, electric oven, sink, dish-washing machine and a refrigerator. Apart from this, it will also have a temperature regulation system and LCD-Internet-TV-home networking system.


Via Peter Verschuere
Steve Kingsley's insight:

I'd leave the internet and TV parts out for the sake of proper digestion!

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