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Eating your greens is good for you! - News

Eating your greens is good for you! - News | healthy living1 | Scoop.it
Eating your greens may be even more important than previously thought, with the discovery that an immune cell population essential for intestinal health could be controlled by leafy greens in your diet.
Ethan Shum's insight:

     Eating your greens may even be more important than ever in discovery that immune cell population is very important for intestinal health and can be controlled with leafy greens in your diet.

 

     the immune cells called innate lymphiod cells are found in the lining of the digestive system and protect the body from bad bacteria that enters it. Greens are very important in controlling inflammatory diseases and obesity, and may even prevent the development of bowel cancers.


     Molecular Immunology division have discovered the gene T-bet is essential for producing a population of these critical immune cells and that the gene responds to signals in the food we eat. ILCs which is a newly discovered cell type that protects the body against infections entering through the digestive system.proteins in green leafy (cruciferous) vegetables are known to interact with a cell surface receptor that switches on T-bet, and might play a role in producing these critical immune cells.ILCs produce a hormone called interleukin-22 (IL-22), which can protect the body from invading bacteria.LCs help to maintain a ‘healthy’ environment in the intestine by promoting good bacteria and healing small wounds and abrasions that are common in the tissues of the gut.


citation:http://www.virtualmedicalcentre.com/news/eating-your-greens-is-good-for-you/18456

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4 Good Reasons to Eat Kale (And One Reason Not To) - AARP News (blog)

4 Good Reasons to Eat Kale (And One Reason Not To) - AARP News (blog) | healthy living1 | Scoop.it
AARP News (blog)
4 Good Reasons to Eat Kale (And One Reason Not To)
AARP News (blog)
The dark green leafy vegetable is everywhere, from upscale restaurant menus to the grocery store snack food aisle (think kale chips).
Ethan Shum's insight:

     A reason one should not have so much intake of kale is because of the vitamin k which is called the "clotting vitamin" so if your taking blood thinners like warfarin; you should cut back on the kale.

 

     Kale is one of the greatest vegetables out there because it is very high in vitamin k which is really good. kale is also high in  high in lutein and zeaxanthin, phytochemicals found in the retina (part of the eye), which could help reduce the risk of macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in older people. Kale is rich in vitamin A or beta carotene which is a powerful antioxident which may boost your immune system health which can protect you from cancer and chronic diseases. Kale is one of the few vegetables with decent percentage amount of calcium; but it is very high in magnesium which which helps prevent osteoporosis, it also works with vitamin D to help absorb the calcium into your body. vitamin K also contributes to bone health as well. foods like Kale have natural antioxidents that are very good for your heart.

 

p.s. kale is hard on the digestive system for "kale newbies" so don't go overboard on it.

 

citation http://blog.aarp.org/2013/03/25/hail-kale-why-you-should-or-shouldnt-eat-it/

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Omega-3s Prolong Life: Harvard Study

Omega-3s Prolong Life: Harvard Study | healthy living1 | Scoop.it
Just how much eating fish is good for you has been a question of debate for some time, and now a new study adds some more data to the pile.

Via Demarcio Washington
Ethan Shum's insight:

     I wonder how much fish you have to eat to for it to have long term health benefits; recent studies have come up.

 

     older adults that have high amounts of omega-3 fatty acids (such found in seafood), " may be able to lower their overall mortality risk by 27% and there mortality risk from heart disease by 35%"

 

     researcher found out that poeple who eat fish often are bound to live 2.2 years longer than an person who does not eat fatty seafoods.

 

     everyone that has a brain knows fish is apart of a healthy diet. but few studies have assesed blood omega-3 levels and total deaths in older adults. Omega-3 fatty acids are important to cardiovascular health and suggest that it would extend the reamaining years of your life. 

 

     this was the first study to compare omega 3 acids to specific mortality rates. National geographic upadated there seafood users guide to tell you levels of mercury and omega 3 acids that are contained in the fish.

    

citation: http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2013/04/02/omega-3s-prolong-life-harvard-study/#.UWLGxUjSC_Q.twitter

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