Healthcare Trends 2014
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Exploring Hospitals’ Use of Facebook: Thematic Analysis #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Exploring Hospitals’ Use of Facebook: Thematic Analysis #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

Background: Although health care organizations such as hospitals and clinics have widely embraced social media as a means to educate the community on health topics and increase patient loyalty and satisfaction, little is known about the content these organizations actually share when using social media channels.

Objective: This study aimed to explore the types of content US hospitals post on their Facebook pages and how hospitals’ Facebook activities differ with regard to content types.

Methods: We collected and thematically analyzed more than 1700 Facebook posts made over a 3-month period by 17 US hospitals. During the first phase, the 2 researchers coded a set of 159 posts and created an initial thematic web of content. During the second phase, the researchers coded the remaining posts and then revised, refined, and validated the initial web of content accordingly. Coding consensus was achieved on 1184 of the 1548 analyzable sampled posts (76.49%).

Results: We identified a list of 13 unique health social media post themes and classified those themes into 3 thematic groups that included announcing, sharing, and recognizingactivities. The most frequently used theme was sharing health information, which appeared in 35.81% (424/1184) of the posts analyzed. Such posts sought to provide health tips and advice to community members. Recognizing special days and recognizing employees were the second and third most frequently used themes, respectively, with 14.95% (177/1184) and 11.82% (140/1184) of the posts containing those themes. The frequency of these themes was surprising as the content was geared more toward stakeholders internal to the organization, although most previous literature has focused on social media as a tool to connect with external stakeholders. In addition, we found many of the posts involved more than one theme, and selected sets of themes co-occurred frequently. For example, 25.4% (45/177) of the posts recognizing special days also included content to share health information, and approximately 38% (32/85) of the posts announcing research activities also included content to share health information. Finally, we found similarities and differences between the sampled hospitals in terms of the types of content they posted more frequently on their Facebook pages.

Conclusions: Hospitals use Facebook as an inexpensive way to educate people on health and wellness topics and to communicate different types of information and news to the public audience. Hospitals and clinics that are expanding their social media activities or are starting to embark on social media strategies can use the results of this study to better formulate their activities on Facebook.


Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Giuseppe Fattori
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What First Time Entrepreneurs Need to Know about the Lean Startup — get greenlit

What First Time Entrepreneurs Need to Know about the Lean Startup - get greenlit - Medium
An amazing idea — it’s what experienced founders and first time entrepreneurs alike live for.
Via Oliver Durrer, Freesource, WordHead
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What First Time Entrepreneurs Need to Know about the Lean Startup — get greenlit

What First Time Entrepreneurs Need to Know about the Lean Startup - get greenlit - Medium
An amazing idea — it’s what experienced founders and first time entrepreneurs alike live for.
Via Oliver Durrer, Freesource
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The drivers behind digital health apps

The drivers behind digital health apps | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

There has been an explosion of digital health startups in recent years. The market is expected to reach $233.3 billion by 2020, with the primary driver coming from the mobile health market.

Companies are springing up to offer solutions for theescalating costs of health care, wellness, physician shortages and the need for improved prevention and management of expensive chronic conditions.

A quick browse of your local Best Buy store will reveal a wide range of fitness trackers and wearable health sensors. There also is a selection of “on-demand” scheduling services for thehealth conscious. Now, patients can even access virtual consultation and telemedicine platforms, such as VirtuMedix and eVisit, at their fingertips.

While the high-tech, quick-fix approach may generate substantial buzz in the media, the question remains: Are these really delivering value to the medical ecosystem and improving healthoutcomes?

 


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Digital Neck-and-Neck with TV Ad Spend in the US - eMarketer

Digital Neck-and-Neck with TV Ad Spend in the US - eMarketer | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it
Nearly two-thirds of US digital ad spending in 2016 will go toward mobile
WordHead's insight:
Is most of your ad spending devoted to TV advertising buys? Current trend projections suggest that digital ad spending will surpass TV by 2020; how will your business respond?
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3 ways to harness the ROI of customer reviews

3 ways to harness the ROI of customer reviews | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

As a result of this industry shift, online reviews have become a primary marketing tool. Between January and November 2015, Trustpilot (my employer) measured a 25-percent increase in customer content posted to its online review community — 5.8 million reviews in total. In 2016, if this trend continues as expected, more than eight million reviews will be published, and millions of new brand impressions will be made.


With these numbers in mind, below are three ways your brand can harness the voice of its customers and start interactive conversations with its audience:...


Via Jeff Domansky
WordHead's insight:

Columnist Jordan Garner discusses the power of reviews and other user-generated content in fostering transparent two-way relationships between brands and customers.

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Carolina Gorosito's curator insight, March 29, 2016 7:00 AM

Columnist Jordan Garner discusses the power of reviews and other user-generated content in fostering transparent two-way relationships between brands and customers.

BSN's curator insight, March 29, 2016 8:09 AM

Columnist Jordan Garner discusses the power of reviews and other user-generated content in fostering transparent two-way relationships between brands and customers.

BSN's curator insight, March 29, 2016 8:11 AM

Columnist Jordan Garner discusses the power of reviews and other user-generated content in fostering transparent two-way relationships between brands and customers.

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3 Content Marketing Tips to Optimize Engagement and Connect with Influencers #influencermarketer

3 Content Marketing Tips to Optimize Engagement and Connect with Influencers #influencermarketer | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it
Content marketing drives brand messaging, showcases your propositions and thought leadership. The tricky part about content marketing is that is we're all selfish content consumers - your audience isn’t interested in your problems; they’re interested in their problems; you engage and grow your audience with content that's meaningful and relevant to the issues they're concerned with. But you shouldn’t be the only voice in your social channels. Most marketers recommend sharing other people’s content 80% of the time, and your own 20% of the time. So, if you’re doing things right, you’re sharing a lot of content. The difficult thing is, not all content is worth sharing, and even less may be relevant to your audience.
 
So what do you do?

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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Jonny Russell's curator insight, March 14, 2016 12:07 PM
Marketing experts are constantly working to optimize the output of their marketing efforts. The ability to generate great online content isn’t enough anymore the superior social media marketers are beginning to take it a few steps further by pairing their great content with their great followers. What do I mean by this? Experts suggest that once a company has managed to generate online marketing content that has been successful in opening lines of communication with the business and its consumers; the company must re-use or maximize the benefits from this content. Once a company has identified their most popular or successful content they must re-share that content to ensure that a majority of their online consumers have been exposed to it. Research shows that almost 80% of any company’s online content is user-generated and user-generated content always has a greater influence on similar users. If a company is successfully able to identify their strongest content whether it be user generated or not and recycle it back through their social media presence the content will have exponentially more impact as it will be seen my more and more consumers each time. A key to making sure that recycling content is continuously improving the image of a company is by connecting with your consumers who have a great social media presence and therefore have influence in their online community. If a company is able to connect personally with a user who is always sharing content and has a low of followers on their social media pages then one post about a company from this user will be hugely beneficial compared to any marketing content generated by the company. Online users are more likely to be influenced by someone who they believe to be their peer rather that an advertisement or piece of marketing content being thrown at them by the company itself.
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Most Mobile Marketers Are Using Location, But How Do You Do It Right?

Most Mobile Marketers Are Using Location, But How Do You Do It Right? | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

The cat is definitely out of the bag regarding location-based mobile targeting. This post from Marketing Land’s Greg Sterling encapsulates the trend well: Most mobile marketers are usinglocation-based targeting, and they’re using it as a proxy for audience segmentation.

 

Although I think this trend needs to go from “most mobile marketers” to “all mobile marketers” sooner rather than later, I won’t focus on that. Instead, I’d like to share some tips from the front line: caveats, insights and more gleaned from our client campaigns, ranging from midsize to Fortune 500 companies.

 

Whether you’re new to location-based mobile targeting or looking for a way to refine yours, you’ll want to pay attention. (And note that some of these tips may look familiar; they’re pretty tried-and-true digital tenets with surprising resonance in the mobile realm.)...


Via Jeff Domansky
WordHead's insight:

With so many marketers using location-based mobile targeting, it's time to either jump on board or step up your strategy. Columnist Craig Weinberg offers some tips to help you fine-tune your efforts.

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imaginetsa's curator insight, March 2, 2016 9:30 AM

With so many marketers using location-based mobile targeting, it's time to either jump on board or step up your strategy. Columnist Craig Weinberg offers some tips to help you fine-tune your efforts.

Angela Watkins's curator insight, March 2, 2016 8:06 PM

With so many marketers using location-based mobile targeting, it's time to either jump on board or step up your strategy. Columnist Craig Weinberg offers some tips to help you fine-tune your efforts.

Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, March 3, 2016 2:36 PM

With so many marketers using location-based mobile targeting, it's time to either jump on board or step up your strategy. Columnist Craig Weinberg offers some tips to help you fine-tune your efforts.

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Nurses and Social Media: 5 Pitfalls to Avoid - Nurseslabs

Nurses and Social Media: 5 Pitfalls to Avoid - Nurseslabs | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, blogs, chat apps – social media have changed the way we interact daily with friends and coworkers as well as how we keep up to date with news and developments in nursing, health, politics and whatever else interests us. Social media has been used effectively in nursing education, the work setting, and patient care. However, as a nurse you need to present yourself as a professional and also think twice about what you share with your 500 friends on Facebook. Nurses are governed by a code of ethics as well as laws on patient confidentiality. A quick, thoughtless post can cause years of heartache if it costs you your job or even loss of licensure and career.

1. Breach of patient confidentiality and invasion of privacy

There have been numerous incidents worldwide of nurses facing disciplinary action or being dismissed for posts which violated patient confidentiality. Some posts were clearly unprofessional such as nurses sharing an image of a patient dying in ER after severe trauma. Most are however due to not considering ethical boundaries such as a nurse sharing a photo of a patient with a former coworker who had nursed the patient in the past.

Confidentiality and protection of the patient’s privacy are a core concept in all codes of ethics for nurses and also covered by laws in most countries. Social media with its instant and widespread communication has opened a new territory which must be negotiated with care. Keep in mind that there is no privacy once something is online. Even if you post on a closed forum or in a group, you have no control over what others do with the information once it is out there. Even if a post is deleted, it can be retrieved later for use in a court of law.

You must avoid posting any information or image which might identify a patient unless you have his or her express permission. As with verbal communication in the health care setting, information about the patient may be shared only with members of the team and then only if it is in the interests of patient care.

2. Tarnishing the reputation of coworkers or an institution

A Canadian nurse posted on Facebook that the some of the nurses were not “up to speed” in caring for her dying father, also naming the institution. A case of professional misconduct was opened against her by the relevant nurses’ registration authority after the nurses laid a complaint at the institution. The case was widely reported on in the media.



    
A bored nurse posted this online and got fired.



While the nurse in question felt that she was commenting on an advocacy role to open discourse about professional standards, the nurses at the institution argued that their professional reputation, as well as that of the institution, had been tarnished within the community.

Avoid posting negative comments about your workplace, co-workers, or even other health care organizations and nursing professionals – even on your own page. When discussing professional issues on member’s only forums, you should also avoid disclosing the institution or unit where you work.

3. Breakdown in relationships in the health team

Negative comments about a colleague or supervisor, even on your own profile page with a privacy setting or in a private message, can lead to unforeseen consequences. While you may be communicating with only one other person, the information could accidentally be seen by or be shared with others. Such comments can affect your reputation, that of a co-worker as well as the working relationships within the team.

The best way to prevent this from happening is never immediately to post about something that has upset you. Rather talk it out with someone than create a permanent record.

4. Putting your own reputation on the line

You might feel that what you do in your own time is your business. Keep in mind, however, that to be respected as a professional you have to maintain a professional image at all times. The interests, attitudes, values, social and personal interests, habits and behaviors you display on social networking sites are there for the world to see, analyze and judge. This can create a positive professional image or have an adverse impact on your reputation and even job opportunities.

Potential employers can and do check up on applicants on these sites and make judgments based on what they see. The same applies to co-workers and supervisors, especially those you have befriended in a new work setting.

Our patients can also search for us on social media pages. Unprofessional behavior and comments can affect the relationship of trust between the nurse and the patient.

Especially if you are a student nurse or new graduate, you should search your name on the web and make sure that what comes up displays a professional image. Also, consider cleaning up your Facebook page posts and removing the images which do not support your professional role.

5. Blurring of personal and professional life

While spending so much time together, we tend to make friends with our coworkers and then connecting with them via social networks. This practice can lead to a blurring of our personal and professional boundaries, at some point affecting either our personal life or relationships within the working environment.

It is also wise not to extend or accept friend requests from patients or former patients as this might violate the patient-nurse boundary and set back the therapeutic relationship.

6. Embrace the benefits

The nursing profession has always adapted to change, and you needn’t shy away from using social media which are likely to play a significant role in nursing education, nursing management as well as patient care in the future.

You can avoid potential problems as long as you consider your professional image and the ethical codes of practice. Apply the principles of patient confidentiality and privacy, respect for employers and other members of the health team, as well professional-patient boundaries in the use of social media just as you would in the health care setting.

Know your employer’s policy on the use of social media or, if they do not have one yet, you can advocate towards having a policy developed.

Some nursing organizations, including the ICN and ANA, have also issued guidelines for nurses’ use of social media, and you might want to print out and share the following handy tip card published by the ANA.



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Digital media vs. HIPAA violations: Risking your reputation in healthcare

Digital media vs. HIPAA violations: Risking your reputation in healthcare | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

Healthcare providers might be in for a rude awakening in 2016.

This year is quickly shaping up to be the one in which digital media moves from having an ancillary impact on healthcare organizations, to one in which it plays just as central a role as it does in other industries.

Blatant warning signs started to crop up in late 2015, but thankfully, there are ways to prepare.

One provider’s (very public) mistake

Before the age of digital and social media, the repercussions around HIPAA violations were somewhat limited in terms of reputation.

Of course, public notification was required, but most concerns stopped after a few traditional media announcements. Today though, the reminders of slip ups and mishaps around patient privacy can resonate indefinitely.

Take the case of the New York City-based doctor whose office accidentally attached the records of 15,000 patients to an email.

The recipient of the email filed a complaint with the Department of Health, notifying them that they had received a spreadsheet that included addresses, appointment dates, and social security numbers of thousands of patients.

Once the leak was reported to the public, patients and even individuals who had never visited the office took to the online review site, Yelp, to document the breach, and even include links to news reports covering the issue.

 

Those one star-reviews and detailed comments are open for anyone to see.

This might sound somewhat trivial — after all, most people use review sites to find shopping centers and avoid poor restaurant experiences — but that’s quickly changing.

A shift in digital media

Changes in the healthcare industry, ranging from the Affordable Care Act (ACA/Obamacare), to a general cultural shift toward more commercialization, are revolutionizing the way patients engage with the entire system.

While most of the biggest upsets come from internal sources, much of the outside world is adjusting to help patients better navigate an increasingly complex healthcare environment.

Yelp itself recently announced a free new feature (facilitated by a partnership with nonprofit news organization, ProPublica) in which users can look up provider-specific data from its review pages.

The initial data included 4,600 hospitals, 15,000 nursing homes, and 6,300 dialysis clinics across the country and is scheduled to be updated quarterly.

Visitors are now able to look up:

Fines paid by nursing homes;Hospital ER average wait times;Readmission frequency due to treatment-related infections or other issues.

This new informational pipeline also flows both ways. ProPublica will also have direct access to healthcare review information as research for news stories, greatly amplifying the reach of the consumer voice in organizational brand images.

Prior to this, the same information was available on Medicare’s Hospital Compare site, but the partnership with Yelp represents a dramatic shift toward the consumerization of patient engagement in healthcare, and it’s one that doesn’t appear to be slowing down.

Additionally, sites like Angie’s List have added review services for health insurance providers, reflecting the fact that patients are beginning to engage with healthcare much in the way they connect with other industries.

The Journal of the American Medical Association recently released a study in which 65% of respondents questioned were aware of online physician ratings.

Of those who did use ratings sites, 35% reported that they selected their physician based on positive reviews, while another 37% indicated they avoided physicians based on negative reviews.

Many providers around the country are proactively addressing the shift in the industry. For example, North Shore LIJ Medical Group, one of the nation’s largest multi-specialty group practices, began posting patient reviews of it physicians in 2015.

Medical organizations who are not making strategic plans to keep up with changes in the industry are risking their future well-being and ability to attract new patients and patient populations.

How to move forward

While examples like these might sound like cautionary tales (and to an extent, they are), smart healthcare organizations will look at these changes in patient engagement as opportunities to listen to patient concerns, as well as inform healthcare consumers of their strengths and specializations.

Doing this effectively will require a strategic and practical management of reputation and risk in a developing environment of healthcare digital media.

 


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Infographic: Cardiologists have their fingers on the pulse of social media

Infographic: Cardiologists have their fingers on the pulse of social media | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

Three in five use some kind of technology to communicate with their patients. Also, video is among the branding trends these specialists prefer.


Via Philippe Marchal, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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5 Unconventional Examples Of Content Marketing

5 Unconventional Examples Of Content Marketing | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it
The secret is out—content marketing is an integral part of SEO.

As more marketers pile on the content marketing bandwagon, it’s increasingly important to make your content stand out from the crowd. Simply writing a blog post, hitting “publish”, and hoping for results won’t cut it. More and more, content marketers need to devise clever, insightful, thoughtful, and compelling ways to craft and distribute their content.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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4 Ways to Stretch Your Infographic Content | Killer Infographics

4 Ways to Stretch Your Infographic Content | Killer Infographics | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it
In today’s multimodal world, there’s no such thing as one size fits all. When you have a great idea that demands recognition, why not use every possible avenue to make sure your message gets heard?


Traditionally, infographics have been the end-medium for repurposing content, and though this is a tried and true method to broaden your reach, it’s really only the beginning of what you can do with that content once it’s an infographic.


This post will explore a few methods for repurposing your infographic into other media....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 11, 2016 11:28 PM

Here's how to repurpose your infographic content to stretch your marketing budget and increase results.

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Doctors are growing to like digital health tools, says the AMA

Doctors are growing to like digital health tools, says the AMA | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it
Notwithstanding the head of the AMA recently referring to digital health technologies as “snake oil,” it appears that one-half of physicians is keen on digital health. And scale, not age, matters when it comes to doctors using digital health tools.The American Medical Association surveyed physicians on their use of digital health tools, finding that primary care physicians and doctors working in larger and more complex practices tend to be more digital.
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How Social Media Support Groups Enhance Patient Experience

How Social Media Support Groups Enhance Patient Experience | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

Internet use and social media have become mainstays in everyday life, changing the way we interact with loved ones or entertain ourselves. But can the internet influence the patient experience? According to one research team, it could.

In a recent study, a team led by Matthias Alexander Kirch, MS, examined how cancer patients use the internet to collect health information, improve their patient engagement, and interact with other patients.

 

Kirch and colleagues found that internet use improves the patient experience. Following a survey of nearly 1,300 cancer patients at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, the researchers found that nearly 85 percent of patients have access to the internet and use it at least weekly. Of those patients, a majority reported a positive experience.

The researchers uncovered one group of users who have a notably more positive experience: patients who engage with other patients via social media or internet support groups. These patients – who either read other patients’ experiences, share their own, or both – are referred to by the researchers as “social producers,” and see many positive effects of internet use.

Beyond having an added layer of support from their internet-using peers, nearly 60 percent of social producers reported feeling reassured in their healthcare decisions andmore empowered to ask their providers more detailed questions about their treatment plans.

Social producers also saw benefits when it came to their own individual healthcare research. While 67 percent of all surveyed patients reported using the internet for personal cancer research, over 80 percent of social producers said their research was useful or somewhat useful.

Kirch and colleagues explained that these results may indicate the internet’s best function. While it serves as a resource for a vast amount of health information, the internet’s best quality is its ability to connect individuals with shared experiences. In this case, it is cancer patients who are fighting similar illnesses.

“Social producers and patients engaged in formal support networks reported that the Internet provided them with the greatest social support as well as information about their diagnosis, suggesting that the real social benefits come from sharing personal experiences,” Kirch and colleagues reported.

The research team found that these kinds of social media habits are becoming more popular. While only 11 percent of patients reported belonging to a formal online support group, many more reported exchanges with their peers over alternative social media websites.

Twenty-one percent of respondents said they had read about other patient experiences online as a form of support, while 37 percent said they had also shared their own stories.

Understanding how to improve patient experience for cancer patients has proven a necessary task. Earlier this year, CancerCare released a survey showing that patient engagement and education has been left wanting in cancer care plans.

While the survey did find high patient satisfaction levels, it also revealed that patients lacked information about their treatment plans. CancerCare suggested that lacking patient-provider communication may be to blame, and that increasing these supports may be helpful.

While establishing a better relationship between the patient and the provider could help improve patient experience in cancer treatment, these new results from Kirch and his colleagues shows another avenue for improving patient care.

Going forward, providers may want to help their patients explore online support communities. In encouraging patients to seek out support online support groups, providers may potentially boost patient satisfaction and patient morale. All of this may culminate in whole-person care, rather than just the treatment of different illnesses or controlling of symptoms.


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Four expert tips for social media marketing as pharma finally embraces the new norm

Four expert tips for social media marketing as pharma finally embraces the new norm | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

Social media was once scary territory for the heavily regulated pharma industry, but today it’s becoming old hat, according to Tamara Littleton, CEO and founder of London social media agency Emoderation. Big Pharma players have realized they can no longer ignore the space where many of their target audiences--patients, families, physicians and even payers--congregate.

“Social offers pharma brands a way to connect with their market over the longer-term. It is also where their customers are and whether they engage or not, or are able to on certain posts, they will be talked about," Littleton told FiercePharmaMarketing by email.

In a column for Econsultancy earlier this month, Littleton pointed out some good examples of pharma companies using social media. She highlighted GlaxoSmithKline’s Twitter account, which focuses on its company values of leadership and research, and Johnson & Johnson’s overall social media presence, which emphasizes its values around the importance of family.

Of course, just because drugmakers are more readily joining social media doesn’t mean using it has become any easier--or that it now requires less vigilance. The job of professional pharma social media managers is demanding, and it requires a particular skill.

So how, then, can pharma social media managers field a successful strategy? Read on for Littleton's thoughts.

Be engaging. Health products may not be as central to a person’s identity as his or her car or clothing brands, but pharma’s social media voice can still make a difference. “People may not build their identities around their chosen brand of painkiller in the same way that they do with their choice of gaming console or favorite clothes brand, but a friendly, engaging social media presence can go a long way to keeping the brand at the forefront of people’s minds,” she wrote in the column.

Share content around the values of the company. Like the J&J and GSK examples Littleton cites, pharma companies can connect with patients and families by highlighting their values and the efforts their people and corporate initiatives make to fulfill those values.

Monitor content to stay in line with advertising guidelines and FDA regulations. That means keeping current on regulations and ensuring pages are constantly monitored so that “any user-generated content posted that contravenes the regulations is removed as soon as possible,” she told FiercePharmaMarketing.

Create an adverse event reporting and escalation process.  Pharma brands active on social media have a dedicated resource to manage their social media presence--whether it’s an internal person or team, or a specialist agency--but they should also have a process for reporting any problems. Littleton noted the need to report an adverse event to the FDA within 24 hours. If pharma companies don’t have a process in place to flag incidents, that one-day clock can pass quickly.


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55 of Our Favorite Digital Marketing Tools for 2016 | Snap Agency

55 of Our Favorite Digital Marketing Tools for 2016 | Snap Agency | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

From my perspective, digital marketing is all about the thinking involved rather than just the tools. But tools these days are making it increasingly easier toimplement those creative ideas, connect with more people, do research quickly and get your content out there.


So without further ado, here are a list of some of our favorite digital marketing tools for 2016....


Via Jeff Domansky
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nonagonstoic's comment, July 19, 2016 5:00 AM
Great
cowbirdroutine's comment, July 19, 2016 5:55 AM
Great
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 19, 2016 5:14 PM

Many potential tools for your social media toolbox.

 
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8 Must-Know Trends For SEO In 2016

8 Must-Know Trends For SEO In 2016 | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it
Google cares about quality... So to win at SEO in 2016 you need to understand these 8 trends and adapt your strategy accordingly.

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Google Knowledge Graph, AMP ... do you know what those terms mean? If not, you might want to take a few minutes and read this from Jeff Bullas. 

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Annie Sisk's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:16 AM

Google Knowledge Graph, AMP ... do you know what those terms mean? If not, you might want to take a few minutes and read this from Jeff Bullas. 

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Ultimate Collection of Free Content Marketing Templates

Ultimate Collection of Free Content Marketing Templates | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

I joined HubSpot in September 2011 as a blogger. At the time, I needed to know how to write and educate through my writing.


Flash forward to today. My content role has evolved eons beyond what I could ever have imagined. To conquer lead gen, I mastered ebook production. To help spread data, I learned how to create infographics. When I write blog posts, that typically means designing a SlideShare or other visual element to accompany the posts.


It's been fun, but it certainly hasn't been easy. These days, content means so much more than just writing. And for those of you who understand that content marketing is a critical component of inbound success, content will need to mean more than just writing for you, too.


Download our full collection of free content marketing templates here. But rather than panic about the endless content formats you need to go master, we're here to make it easy for you. In this post, you'll find what I wish I had once upon a content marketer's dream: a full collection of 386+ free, customizable, content creation templates. Let's take a look at what's inside....


Via Jeff Domansky
WordHead's insight:

Discover 386+ templates that can help you improve all facets of your inbound marketing efforts -- from content planning to infographic design. A super resource from HubSpot. Recommended reading. 10/10

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Mike Allen's curator insight, March 27, 2016 8:21 AM

Discover 386+ templates that can help you improve all facets of your inbound marketing efforts -- from content planning to infographic design. A super resource from HubSpot. Recommended reading. 10/10

imaginetsa's curator insight, March 27, 2016 1:41 PM

Discover 386+ templates that can help you improve all facets of your inbound marketing efforts -- from content planning to infographic design. A super resource from HubSpot. Recommended reading. 10/10

Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, March 29, 2016 4:34 PM

Discover 386+ templates that can help you improve all facets of your inbound marketing efforts -- from content planning to infographic design. A super resource from HubSpot. Recommended reading. 10/10

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How to Identify Social Media Influencers | Sprout Social

How to Identify Social Media Influencers | Sprout Social | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it
If you hang around a social media marketer long enough, you’re bound to hear the term social media influencers tossed around in conversation. This is because social media influencers are the bread and butter to marketing strategies to help build valuable relationships on social media platforms.

For beginners, most social media managers prize their social media influencers because they drive engagement, discussions and word of mouth for your brand. However, you can’t simply deem someone an influencer just because they talk about your brand. Instead you need to clearly define the characteristics of your influencer, know where they’re going to be and how they can drive more value to your brand.


Via Kamal Bennani, Giuseppe Fattori
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How disease outbreaks drive digital health innovation

How disease outbreaks drive digital health innovation | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

To what extent do disasters and disease outbreaks drive developments in digital health? And as the WHO and other national and global health agencies get to grips with the Zika virus outbreak, what lessons can be learned from the 2014 Ebola epidemic?

 

John Edmunds, Dean of the Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, described how, in the early days of the Ebola outbreak, clinicians wearing protective outfits struggled to write up notes by literally shouting through a wall to colleague, which was both time consuming, error-prone, and labour intensive.

Paper notes leaving high risk treatment zones posed too high an infection risk. Necessity proved to be the mother of invention. Sterilisable data collection (pictured above) co-developed by aid agency MSF and Google provided waterproof tablet devices linked to a local server the size of a postage stamp. The devices could withstand Sierra Leone’s high humidity levels and used batteries could easily be recharged.

 

But Edmunds, addressing UCL’s Festival for Digital Health in London this week, said such hardware cannot always be easily mothballed for use in future outbreaks such as Zika virus. Storage can be expensive, kit goes out of date, technical platforms are constantly refreshed. And staff trained to use the devices move on to other jobs. Such issues, he concluded, mean “paper and Excel aren’t going out of business any time soon.”


Via Alex Butler
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People with epilepsy invited to share seizure data via app for research| Epilepsy Society

People with epilepsy invited to share seizure data via app for research| Epilepsy Society | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

The app helps users manage their epilepsy by tracking their seizures and possible triggers, medications and side effects. Although the app is not an alarmed seizure detection device, it does allow users to send a message to caregivers to let them know when the user is tracking a seizure.The EpiWatch allows users to contribute their to epilepsy research by sharing their personal health and seizure data with Johns Hopkins researchers. The researchers conducting the study are exploring whether a future app could potentially detect seizures, estimate their duration and contact caregivers, all using Apple Watch.


Via Alex Butler
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6 Steps to Updating Your Social Media Profiles During a Rebrand 

6 Steps to Updating Your Social Media Profiles During a Rebrand  | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it
Do you need to update your social identity?

Are you looking for a simple way to make sure all your social channels are consistent?

In this article you’ll discover a checklist that will help you rebrand your social media profiles.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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77 Tools to Build a Website or App Without Code

77 Tools to Build a Website or App Without Code - Life Learning - Medium
Here's a list of the best website & app builders

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Jeff Domansky
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Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, February 19, 2016 12:12 PM

Weebly is my favorite, but there are loads of good resources on this list. 

John Shank's curator insight, February 26, 2016 3:57 PM

Nice list!

Philippe Trebaul's curator insight, March 20, 2016 4:32 PM

Long list, several gems.Weebly has new templates and is easy to use.

Rescooped by WordHead from #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial
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Who doctors ACTUALLY follow – February 2016

Who doctors ACTUALLY follow – February 2016 | Healthcare Trends 2014 | Scoop.it

Readers of this blog are already familiar with my disdain for unscientifically generated “top 100” style lists (except when I’m on them, of course). So in the spring of 2014, we published a series of posts looking who doctors follow on twitter. No subjectivity to it; just a list based on how many US doctors followed an individual twitter account.

In spite of Twitter’s recent financial woes, it is still THE go-to social media channel for physicians, reporters and many others in the online health ecosystem. Smart healthcare companies have known for years that online physicians are the unseen force that drives opinion & news in healthcare (Reference: Missing the Forest for the Trees: The change in physician roles that the healthcare industry missed | Measles Outbreak Story Broken by Doctor, Not Media | Online Physicians Fight Against Bad Science in the Media), so who they follow online is actually a pretty good indicator of who’s doing work that matters in healthcare. So when we have the ability to look at tens of thousands of validated physician accounts and see who they collectively follow the most, it can give us a pretty good read on what these online bellwethers of health really care about. Here are some of the things we found when we looked at the 1,000 twitter accounts that are most followed by a custom panel of US doctors (see detailed notes on methodology at the bottom of this post).

 


Via Giuseppe Fattori
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