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5 Ways To Bring Data And Design Into The Battle Against Diabetes

5 Ways To Bring Data And Design Into The Battle Against Diabetes | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Diabetes is one of the most alarmingly large health epidemics in the U.S.--a whopping 25.8 million people Americans live with the disease. That’s 8.3% of the population. Sanofi US aims to impact that group (outside of its diabetes drugs) with the Data Design Diabetes challenge, an effort to bring human-center design and open data to the diabetes community. This week, Sanofi announced the five semi-finalists.

 

Last year, the open innovation challenge brought a number of data-driven products for diabetes out of the woodwork, including Ginger.io, an app that analyzes phone usage data to detect when patients are feeling down. Since its win, Ginger.io has raised $1.7 million in seed funding.

 

This time around, the challenge did things a little differently: Instead of just asking people to submit ideas on how to drive innovation in delivery of diabetes care, Sanofi first polled the public to find out what mattered most in terms of quality, delivery, and cost of diabetes care in the U.S. "They said they wanted to create tools that could make people feel in control, recognize that people want to be well and not just have symptoms addressed, and understand that diabetes is a disease that affects families, friends, and close communities," explains Michele Polz, head of patient solutions, U.S. diabetes at Sanofi. After going through over 70 entries, the judges whittled them down to these semifinalists:

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3 Reasons Why Social Networking Is Not a Waste of Time for Health Professionals : Health in 30

3 Reasons Why Social Networking Is Not a Waste of Time for Health Professionals : Health in 30 | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Social networking allows doctors, nurses and other health professionals to deeply connect and engage with the community and their colleagues.

 

“We are standing at the precipice of a new online revolution in health care. As more and more health experts embrace the Internet and increase their social media activity, health information seekers will undoubtedly benefit in profound ways.” [Source: Mashable]

 

Dynamic health and medical professionals engaged in social networking, using Twitter, Facebook, Blogs and YouTube are on the front-line of new modern medicine.

 

Today’s modern medicine is all about the patient. Participating, partnering and developing a professional relationship is paramount.

 

While many health consumers are searching the web for support, reassurance and specific health news and information; doctors and nurses continue to question the value of the internet for patients.

Social networking sites such as Twitter, Facebook, and Blogs are not a waste of time for health professionals because it offers value.

 

Social networking sites and blogs are a powerful and phenomenal platform to educate patients, raise awareness of health issues and it offers a forum to collaborate and connect. It gives a voice to patients and it allows for the conversation to get started with their doctors and other health care professionals.

Doctors, nurses and other health professionals can help validate what is important for patients.

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Sloppy EHR Implementation Could Threaten Patient Safety

Sloppy EHR Implementation Could Threaten Patient Safety | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

A study of health IT implementation at seven Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals shows that when information systems are implemented without proper planning and management, problems can occur and threaten patient safety. These problems are not unique to VA hospitals, and other institutions will undoubtedly encounter them as they roll out their own electronic health records.


Published in the American Journal of Managed Care, the study was based on interviews with nurses, pharmacists, physicians, IT staff members, and managers. The interviews were conducted several years after the introduction of the VA's computerized patient record system (CPRS) and bar code medication administration (BCMA) system.

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Personal v Professional Physician Social Media

Personal v Professional Physician Social Media | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Almost 90% of physicians use at least one site for personal use and over 65% for professional purposes.

 

Personal use surpasses professional use when it comes to physicians on social media. Today, more doctors use two or more social media platforms for personal purposes compared with social sites used for professional purposes.

 

As a profession, doctors have a significant interest in the potential applications of social media to patients and other clinicians. They illustrate interest in online physician communities and patient communities that may facilitate doctor-patients interactions.

 

A small group of “connected clinicians”, use multiple social media platforms for both personal and professional use.

 

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Pharma's iPad attraction marks tech adoption shift

Pharma's iPad attraction marks tech adoption shift | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Tech companies have often struggled to crack the code for appealing to drugmakers and healthcare companies, which have been notoriously resistant to many of the latest trends in IT.

 

But there's mounting evidence that drug companies are changing the way they consume new tech, and one prime example of this shift is the industry's well-documented affection for Apple's ($AAPL) iPad. Pharma companies are buying the tablets by the thousands, doling them out to sales reps and executives, some of whom probably already own the popular devices.

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Create health care news outlets for your patients

Create health care news outlets for your patients | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Give your patients information sound, reasonable information to read.

 

Here's social media strategy that, at first glance, may appear to be contradictory or, at the very least, not a good use of hospital resources.

 

I suggest that as the availability of online health care news becomes more prevalent and the number of patients searching the Internet seeking health care news increases, hospitals should become more involved in aggregating and creating health care news outlets for their patients.

 

For example, I am suggesting that a cancer center aggregate and create a newsfeed, blog, Facebook page, Twitter feed or other news distribution mechanism.

 

Why the extra step when patients can simply Google "cancer news" and have current information at their fingertips? In a word: uncertainty.

Uncertainty creates problems for chronically ill patients

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Social media an outcomes listening post for pharma

Social media an outcomes listening post for pharma | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

FDA issues may deter drugmakers from engaging in social media, but that's no excuse to ignore what audiences are saying on these platforms, say pharma and device firms.

 

“You cannot put your head in the ground like an ostrich and pretend dialogue is not happening, because it is,” said Pat Choumitsky, senior manager, consumer marketing, UCB Pharma.

 

Speaking Monday at the Pharmaceutical Marketing Research Group (PMRG) 2012 Annual National Conference in Orlando, Choumitsky said UCB listens to patient-reported outcomes on PatientsLikeMe.com. Being involved in the online patient community has helped the firm, which focuses on epilepsy and immunology, to shape its clinical trials and messaging. “It's important that we're listening and not afraid of adverse events.”

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Why Facebook should be a template for electronic medical records

Why Facebook should be a template for electronic medical records | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

It sounds like Facebook would make a great starting template for a vast interconnected medical records system. But the reality is that the electronic medical record (EMR) industry is still stuck in the era of the BBS.

 

The similarities between modern EMRs and the BBS system are striking. Like many old Bulletin Board Systems the vast majority of EMR systems do not communicate with each other (nor even the outside world). Not only are they often incapable of communicating with another EMR or computer but even in 2012 most new EMRs don’t even have an option for sharing information with other systems! This is one of the biggest paradoxes and failures of almost all EMRs. Designed for an industry where the sharing of medical information among different facilities and health care providers is critical to the timely, effective, and safe delivery of medical care, the majority of these systems are designed to share information only within the limited confines of the specific facility or health care system that they serve. EMRs are essentially information islands cut off almost completely from direct contact with the rest of the interconnected world.

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Social Media in Medical Education

Slides from presentation to University of Utah School of Medicine faculty on the usefulness of social media in medical education.

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Are Smartphones Distracting Doctors?

Doctor, what do you think? Doctor? Doctor?

 

These are words uttered by a number of patients today as doctors use an increasing number of “screens” while simultaneously interacting with their patients.

 

These screens offer access to mobile devices such as touchpads, smartphones, and laptop computers. During the already restricted time that patients have with doctors, they are now being asked to compete with such devices.

 

The question for researchers, clinicians, hospital administrators, and most importantly patients is: does this integration of new devices distract doctors or enhance the care they provide to patients?

 

This article reviews this issue and prospects for future research.

 

The Article : http://www.imedicalapps.com/2012/04/smartphones-distracting-doctors/

 

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Why Would Government Launch an Open Source EHR Community?

Why Would Government Launch an Open Source EHR Community? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Last summer, the US Department of Veterans Affairs launched OSEHRA, the central governing body of a new open source software community focused on electronic health records. The community is growing rapidly, with more than 750 members from industry, government, and academia so far. VA has contributed its VistA EHR software, and many community members are engaged in everything from refactoring VistA code to working out the architecture of future EHRs.

 

The care and feeding of OSEHRA’s new open source community will be the subject of a case study at the upcoming Open Source Think Tank.

 

But why would a government agency start down this untrodden path to begin with?

 

VistA, is central to the quality of care that VA delivers to Veterans at 152 hospitals and more than 900 outpatient clinics. It was designed by clinicians for clinicians and embodies the patient-centric clinical workflow that supports VA’s models of care.

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My Health Checklist 2012 app contains evidence based preventative health advice for patients

How low should my cholesterol be? Should my father be screened for prostate cancer?

Does my daughter need the HPV vaccine?

 

Should my wife be screened for ovarian cancer?

 

Do any members of my family need folic acid, and if so, how much?

 

These are just several examples of the many questions and concerns that adults may have about preventive health and health maintenance for themselves and their loved ones.

 

The US Department of Health and Human Services provides the AHRQ-ePSS App (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality – electronic Preventive Services Selector) for healthcare professionals, but today we review an analogous app that seeks to provide non-healthcare professionals with information on preventive health and health maintenance.

 

Targeted primarily towards non-healthcare professionals, the My Health Checklist 2012 App comes to us from Proven Health Ways.

 

Its trademark is this website developed by Dr. Paul Hartlaub, a preventive medicine physician, to provide consumers with reliable information on “what really works to prevent disease.”

 

Browsing the Proven Health Ways website reveals a dedication to evidence-based recommendations, including reliance on the reputable United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

 

More at http://www.imedicalapps.com/2012/04/health-checklist-2012-app-review-preventative-health-advice-evidencebased/ ;

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RxEOB: Mobile soon to be necessary part of ‘meaningful use’ | mobihealthnews

RxEOB: Mobile soon to be necessary part of ‘meaningful use’ | mobihealthnews | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

So far, incentive program for “meaningful use” of electronic health records has not required any mobile component, nor may it ever, but mobility is fast becoming a de facto necessity for achieving meaningful use in many clinical settings.

 

“I’m not sure how [physicians] do that without having access to [EHRs] wherever they are,” Robert Oscar, CEO of RxEOB, a Richmond, Va., company that makes Web-based and mobile applications mostly to help consumers understand the pharmacy benefits of their health insurance, says in an interview with MobiHealthNews.

 

Doctors will use their mobile devices to view and update the EHRs in their practices as well as connect to the hospitals they practice at and admit patients to. “They’re going to need mobile apps,” Oscar says. “The concept that they’re going to carry around a laptop or sit at a desk all the time just doesn’t seem feasible to me.”

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U.S. Physicians Hesitant About Health IT

U.S. Physicians Hesitant About Health IT | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

American doctors have a curious attitude toward health IT: Most agree with physicians around the world that technology provides better access to quality data for clinical research, improves coordination of care and reduces medical errors.

 

But U.S. physicians are at odds with their international colleagues about technology’s value in improving diagnostic and treatment decisions and treatment outcomes – most American doctors doubted technology could help.

 

Why would American physicians be less inclined than others to be pro-technology? It’s not because they avoid digital tools – 30 percent of U.S. physicians use a tablet device, compared to 5 percent usage by American consumers. But like the rest of the population, doctors may find the endless debates about which manufacturer has the best product for the job just as frustrating as those trying to choose between an iPhone and an Android.

 

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Data breaches of small businesses, including doctor offices, on the rise

Data breaches of small businesses, including doctor offices, on the rise | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

A report says cyber criminals are seeking what they consider easy targets.

 

Small organizations, including physician practices, represented the largest number of data breaches in 2011, according to Verizon’s annual Data Breach Investigations Report.

 

The report examined 855 breaches across the globe that accounted for 174 million compromised records in 2011. The analysis found that cyber criminals are responsible for a large number of breaches globally, and small organizations are considered easy targets.

 

One of the reasons breaches at small health care organizations are on the rise is that automated attacks searching for remote Internet access services combined with weak passwords “were successful against smaller health care businesses, such as physicians’ offices and clinics,” said Marc Spitler, senior risk analyst of RISK Intelligence for Verizon.

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Healthcare Basics: Continuity of Care, It Takes an Empowered Patient To Make it Happen

Healthcare Basics: Continuity of Care, It Takes an Empowered Patient To Make it Happen | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Patients are increasingly seen by a wide array of providers in a number of different locations, often raising concerns about fragmentation of care. When patients are most ill and need to be hospitalized, they are seen, not by their PCP who knows them well and who they trust, but by hospitalists and specialists who they have often never met. The way the system is now structured, the level of acuity of hospitalized patients has gone up drastically because insurance companies are increasingly refusing to pay for patients with lesser illnesses to be treated in the hospital. The hospitalist, who has day by day experience with in-patient care becomes the lead doctor.

 

According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, it is an obligation of physicians to provide continuity of care to their patients in all settings, both directly and by coordination of care with other health care professionals. Continuity implies a sense of affiliation between patients and their practitioners and the passing off of all necessary information..

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The Truth Between Patients and e-Patients

The Truth Between Patients and e-Patients | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

e-Patients, otherwise known as internet patients, are health consumers who use the web to find information about certain medical conditions.

 

ese savvy surfers also use electronic communication to source information for family, friends and their own ailments.

 

e-Patients are equipped, enabled, empowered, engaged, equals, emancipated and experts.

 

e-Patients report two outcomes of their health information searches ::

 

better health information and services

 

different [not always better!] relationship with their doctor

 

 

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7 Tips for Marketing a Physician Practice Online and Healthcare IT Social Media

Develop a Social Media Plan

 

Remember, the Goal is to Connect

 

Understand Your Community

 

Take Control of Your Online Presence

 

Start Your Own Blog

 

Don’t Be Afraid of Making Mistakes

 

Find a Good Partner

 

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The Healthcare Marketer’s Role in Innovation

The Healthcare Marketer’s Role in Innovation | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Scan any health system strategic plan these days and you’ll see the word “transformation.” It’s a top of mind issue for healthcare executives trying to restructure, position and prepare their organizations for success in the new world. Changing economics are front and center, and require new ways of thinking about care delivery, market growth, risk management and customer engagement

 

But transformation does not happen without innovation. Customer orientation, creativity, and culture are key leverage points for chief marketing officers (CMOs) to drive innovations in brand activities, service offerings, packaging, customer experience, customer engagement, channel management, pricing, and strategic partnerships that strengthen competitive performance.

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How does a Website help Promote a Gynaecology practice

How does a Website help Promote a Gynaecology practice Examples of Features on Websites by Gynaecs which help Patients, enchant visitors and ensure they get more visibility

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5 Ways to Engage Patients with Social Media

5 Ways to Engage Patients with Social Media | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The success of any social media campaign can be summed up in one word: engagement. An engaging post will generate conversation, is more likely to be shared and can open your social network to more viewers—and potential patients!

 

Here are our 5 favorite ways to engage patients with social media:


1. Host a contest:
Hosting a contest is one of the most popular ways to engage your social media fan base. If there’s a strong incentive to “like” your page, you’ll not only acquire more fans, but have more fans checking back on a regular basis.

Before deciding to host a contest, you may want to take a look at Facebook’s promotion guideline.

A simpler, less time-consuming alternative to hosting a contest is asking your audience trivia questions. Even if you’re not offering an incentive, trivia questions are likely to get a response.

 

2. Ask questions:
Asking for tips and questions from your audience is a great way to get patients involved. Ask them to share their healthiest recipe or favorite fitness routine. This will generate conversation that leads back to your social network!

 

3. Share information in terms fans and followers can understand:
It’s essential to understand your target patient. Knowing how they communicate is important when composing your posts. Using terms your patients can comprehend is crucial in engaging them, because if they don’t understand, they won’t get involved!

 

4. Publish guest blog posts by patients:
Something perhaps more out of the ordinary is reaching out to your past and present patients and asking them to share their stories on your blog or social networks. Publishing these posts by patients can be extremely successful in appealing to readers. The chance of them emotionally relating to another patient is more likely than them relating to you as their healthcare provider.

 

5. Designate time to answer questions:
Make yourself available at the same time daily or weekly to answer questions. Other options to consider are creating tweet chats about designated topics with easy to follow hashtags, e.g. #HighBloodPressure, or even Google+ Hangouts. Google+ Hangouts provide a more interactive forum to connect with patients. You can video chat with numerous users at one time to answer questions and talk healthcare!

 

What types of posts do you find are most engaging to your patients?

 

 

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Do's and Dont's for Physicians on Facebook

Do's and Dont's for Physicians on Facebook | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

So finally Social Media has hit the spot with doctors. Its the first form of technology which Doctors have adopted worldwide on their own( without pressure, incentives or kickbacks.)

 

Recent statistics show that while 87% of the physicians surveyed reported using Social media for personal purposes, a significant 67% also claimed to be using it for Professional use. Social Media has ushered healthcare into an exciting world of free expression and multi faceted communication

 

There have also been some unfortunate cases coming to light, where doctors have been penalized for overdoing it on Social Media. Also 45 % of the organizations surveyed claimed to have no policy for Social Media. In this article we'll look at some do's and don'ts for Physicians so that they can use Facebook safely and not let it cause legal problems for themselves in the future.

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Digital revolution takes on medical records

Digital revolution takes on medical records | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

For decades, technology has advanced the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of patient illnesses and diseases in the medical field.

 

Yet the documentation of patient care has remained mired in the archaic process of handwritten notes — until now.

 

A 2009 law aimed at creating electronic medical records and linking the information to key parties also provided some $20 billion in funding to get doctors and hospitals to convert from handwritten to electronic records.

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Physicians and Blogging

Physicians and Blogging | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

So why should a Physican blog? What can a Physician Blog about ?

 

Physicians as professionals, learn something unique and interesting everyday. They should blog because they have experiences which are fascinating and stories which are unique; that people want to hear.

 

They should blog so that medical students and the younger upcoming physicians learn from their experiences. They should blog because if they don't, they will be wasting an opportunity that is available today to archive the information they possess.

 

A Physician can blog to educate, to share their vision, to market themselves and their practices, or simply show that they have a human side ...

 

A Blog can help you build a physicians online presence faster than any other method today. Its the natural extension to a website and due to its sticky nature, helps create an engaging presence

 

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Is It Time for a Health App Store?

Is It Time for a Health App Store? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

In these cash strapped times, we’re all looking for money whenever we can find it. And few organizations have been hit harder than charities and Not for Profit organizations. So we try and make a point of highlighting “win-win” propositions that help out worth organizations while also helping consumers.

 

Case in point, we received information from the American Diabetes Association about their new Facebook App, a Diabetes Risk Test that helps raise awareness about the risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. The test is easy and free (heck you don’t even have to leave Facebook to take it). And best of all, the ADA receives $5 from a corporate sponsor for every test that’s taken. What worthy organization is helping the ADA with their funding, you ask? Why Boar’s Head delicatessen meats, of course.

 

Say what? With all the efforts being undertaken by Pharma companies when it comes to Diabetes education, Boar’s Head was the only partner the ADA could find? That seems pretty bizarre. especially when the next suggested step after taking the test is to participate in a program called “CheckUp America” which is partially sponsored by Janssen. You know the same Janssen that our pal John Mack was chastising for getting out of the Facebook business a couple of weeks ago. In fact, John’s blog has been full of initiatives by Roche, Sanofi and others to improve diabetes education using digital technology.

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