healthcare technology
124.4K views | +0 today
Follow
healthcare technology
The ways in which technology benefits healthcare
Curated by nrip
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

How providers impede their chances for smooth-running EHR systems

How providers impede their chances for smooth-running EHR systems | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The move from paper-based records to Electronic Health Records (EHR) marches relentlessly on and is becoming an increasingly widespread requirement.

 

Some EHR systems are easier to implement than others. But even when a health facility chooses a good system that’s appropriate for the size and type of facility, sometimes EHR systems are poorly implemented and become a headache to clinic employees, patients, and even the providers themselves.

 

This article explores why putting an EHR system into place such that it satisfies site-specific everyday requirements can sometimes go wrong, and how to avoid these pitfalls.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

HRS: Play where the puck is by adopting EHR tech

HRS: Play where the puck is by adopting EHR tech | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Digitization with an EHR will provide the foundation necessary to take medicine to the next level while improving operational efficiencies and workflow, which then may improve quality of care and outcomes, stated Amit J. Shanker, MD, of Bassett Healthcare at the New York Presbyterian Health System in Cooperstown, N.Y., on May 9 during the 33rd annual scientific sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society.

 

“While promises abound, our feet must remain on the ground,” Shanker said, mentioning that some physicians have compared adopting an EHR to repairing or building an airplane.

Shanker stated that until 2007, EHR adoption has been somewhat lackluster with only 25.9 percent of medical practices having some form of EHR. Even then, most of the information exchange was rudimentary.

 

Noting the U.S. is behind other countries like the Netherlands, New Zealand and the U.K. where EHR penetration exceeded 80 percent, Shanker stated that the time for adoption is critical. Hesitations to adoption include funding, anticipation of implementation difficulty, process workflow redesign and lack of support of medical staff within the group.

 

“What’s interesting is these hesitations for EHR adoption are universally found in the adoption and internalization of any novel technology regardless of sector,” Shanker said. “[Technology change management] requires the support of the people involved in implementation and use of the system. As such, mechanisms need to be in place that provide real-time communication and feedback so an organization can progress from one stage to the next with the ultimate goal of institutionalization of a technology within an organization.”

 

Smartphone and EHR collaborations already are being leveraged, he reported. In 2011, the telecom industry reaped $2 billion in revenue from mobile-to-mobile (m2m) technology so “it will be increasingly important for your practice to play where the puck is going to be, which underscores the importance to adopt EHR,” Shanker noted.

He said that the m2m market is set to hit $8 billion by 2017. “Products and services are coming out each week.”

 

For example, he mentioned a system in Sacramento, Calif., that increased compliance to check blood sugars and take medication 80 percent at five months using automated reminder texts to diabetic patients.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

HIPAA changes could put health IT companies on the hook

Changes expected to become law in coming months would make high-tech companies that deal with health care data – including those in the fields of biometrics, health IT and even cloud hosting services that have health care organizations as clients – liable for data breaches under the federal HIPAA statute.


The federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was first passed in 1996 to set standards for electronic health care transactions, as well as severe penalties for breaches of identifiable patient data.

 

Proposed modifications to the HIPAA Privacy, Security, Enforcement and Breach Notification Rules - part of the so-called HITECH Act - were sent to the federal Office of Management and Budget in March, the final step in the new rules becoming final.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

EP Social Networks: Are We There, Yet?

EP Social Networks: Are We There, Yet? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
What practice-changing medical research have you come across on Facebook? What amazing EM career opportunities did you discover on LinkedIn? What enlightening medical conversations have you had on Twitter? There’s a good chance the answers are none, none and none. When it comes to meaningful physician-physician interaction, online social networking has yet to really take off. Sure, doctors use Facebook like everyone else, but – by and large – they haven’t tapped into the educational potential that online social networks offer.

 

In a world where Facebook is valued at about $100 billion, and spends $1 billion on Instagram (a photo-sharing network that never made a dime) it’s a good idea to ask, what exactly is a social network? In the article “Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship,” UC Berkeley’s Danah Boyd offers a useful definition:

 

“a web-based service that allows individuals to (1) construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system, (2) articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system.” These criteria filter out a number of online media sites that simply allow physicians to create profiles and post contributions, such as Student Doctor Network and Medscape’s Physician Connect, as well as those that generate and display physician profiles for rating purposes, such as Vitals.com and HealthGrades.com.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Social Media and Meaningful Use

Social Media and Meaningful Use | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Social Media seems a total disconnect from criteria for meaningful use of electronic medical records and the ability to qualify for incentive funding by Medicare. Well, guess again. One of the Meaningful Use, stage II requirement is digital inclusion of patient involvement in access to electronic portals, and medical data.

 

Not only does Stage II of Meaningful Use call for patient portals and the like, it will require enticing patients to use them.

 

This is where Social Media becomes almost essential to a medical practice. “The ‘empowered patients’ respond to this type of marketing – they don’t even pay attention to traditional media. They are the influencers. As Stage 2 of Meaningful Use comes out and providers are required to activate patients online, they’ll need to grab the empowered patients they already have and turn those folks into evangelists.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Physicians and social media: Follow the money

Physicians would not be well advised to use social media to connect with patients, said family physician Dike Drummond in a recent commentary posted to KevinMD.com--one of the top social media sites for doctors.

 

His view is evidently similar to that of the majority of his colleagues: while 84 percent of physicians use social media for personal reasons and 67 percent for professional purposes, few of them communicate with patients on Facebook, Twitter, or other social sites.
Some experts say that physicians are reluctant to use Facebook or Twitter for patient contact because of privacy or malpractice issues--and that's undoubtedly true in many cases.

 

But Drummond observed that physicians are not paid for going on social media sites with patients unless they have concierge practices. Furthermore, he pointed out, studies show that a third of physicians feel burned out on any given work day.

 

So the extra time and effort required to interact with patients on social media might be the straw that breaks the camel's back, he argued.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

A new study shows some physicians use social media inappropriately.

A new study shows some physicians use social media inappropriately. | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
Back in college, a friend of mine was seeing a therapist. It was a small school, and the therapist was always in the commons drinking coffee and smoking with the students, including my friend.

 

t was a little sketchy even back then, but she was sure it would end after college. It hasn’t: More than 20 years later, the shrink is all over Facebook. She’s “liked” my friend’s business Facebook page, she frequently comments on the alumni page, and she’s become Facebook friends with other classmates. My friend is not happy that this ex-therapist—someone with whom she shared deeply personal issues from a difficult time in her life—has taken advantage of easy online access to her, even if it’s virtual. Old classmates you never liked all that much lurking on your page are one thing, but a medical professional who knows your inner secrets is a whole other level of invasion. In my friend’s words: It’s creepy.

 

Here’s the problem: Doctors are learning social media nuts and bolts by trial and error. As recently as 2010, only 10 percent of medical schools had social media policies, according to an article in Medical Education Online. Some—like those of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine—go beyond the general guidance offered by most by including a colorful list of concrete examples of what not to do, such as posting a photo of a baby discharged from the hospital without getting the parents’ permission. Other guidelines, such as those put out by the American Medical Association, advise doctors to be careful when posting and to always maintain patient privacy, but these recommendations—instead of popping up as screen savers on exam room computers as regular reminders—are buried in websites.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

The emergence of mHealth has highlighted the importance of digital sharing and collaboration

The growth in internet and social media networking has introduced a new era in healthcare.

This growth in mobile health, or “mHealth”, will have a number of implications, which can be broadly defined as a new opportunity for health professionals to explore, listen and engage with both patients and colleagues.

 

In order to maximize the advantage of connected care solutions, we must first identify how advances in social media and mobile technologies have shifted the paradigm for consuming health information online. By engaging patients online regarding information and issues affecting them, doctors can incorporate the availability, flexibility and mobility inherent in mHealth approaches to care in order to make healthcare more accessible.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Virtualization Gets a Second Opinion from Health Care IT

Virtualization Gets a Second Opinion from Health Care IT | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
Virtualization hasn't really taken the health care industry by storm, but in the past few years it's becoming increasingly commonplace for organizations large and small to either jump or dabble in storage, server and desktop virtualization by using software to divide physical servers and desktops into multiple virtual environments.

 

Nearly every health care provider over 150 beds has some form of virtualization in its IT ecosystem, according to Jeff White, a principal at Aspen Advisors, a health care consulting firm. That movement has picked up steam as health care executives-and vendors-have gotten over the FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) of trading physical iron for software to run key operations, he says.


"A few years ago many executives worried about the reliability of a virtualized environment, and many of those fears were based on health IT vendors being reluctant to support their applications in the environment," White says. "But the benefits of it in terms of management and controllability have really proven out, and virtualization has really started being embraced the past couple years."


The reason for that change of heart of the C-level and HIT vendors wasn't based on an epiphany, but a reality: The stunning and accelerating growth of electronic data that needs to stored and processed makes purchasing physical servers to keep up a suicidal financial decision.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

How To Ease EHR Frustration

How To Ease EHR Frustration | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

EHR systems are getting better; no one can deny that. Vendors continue to improve functionality and add useful features. Systems let clinicians connect remotely via tablets and smartphones. Most EHRs have basic business intelligence capabilities to help healthcare providers collect the data they need to qualify for Meaningful Use financial incentives.


But doctors still complain about one shortcoming: These tools can impede their productivity, reducing the number of patients they can see each day.


In a survey posted by American EHR Partners, a collaboration between the American College of Physicians and software vendor Cientis Technologies, one respondent complained, "It takes twice as long to complete a patient's visit, and I see 75% of the patients now as compared to before EHR." Another survey respondent--a young, computer-savvy doc--griped about having to click too many times and switch among multiple screens: "The EHR makes every aspect of the work involved with patient care take MUCH longer than it did before."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Doctors' love-hate relationship with EHRs

Doctors' love-hate relationship with EHRs | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
As with anything new, most physicians go into implementation of an electronic health record system with certain expectations. Sometimes those expectations are exceeded, sometimes they are not met — for better or worse.

 

Many likes and dislikes about EHRs are consistent in the physician community. Implementation will, no doubt, change a practice. But knowing what to expect will help determine how physicians handle the changes.

 

There are some changes with EHR implementation that physicians dislike but learn to live with. There are others that force the physicians to switch vendors altogether. Knowing the pain points, as well as the things physicians really like about EHRs, doctors still in the market may have a better idea of what to look for — or at least a better idea of what to expect.

 

“The computer is always a good and a bad story if you ask me,” said Dean F. Sittig, PhD, professor of biomedic informatics at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Biomedical Informatics. “It’s a hugely important new tool for your clinic, and you have got to learn to use it. It’s not a simple thing. It’s not like a new kind of stethoscope. It’s a whole new way of doing something.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Use of Social Media by Western European Hospitals: Longitudinal Study

Use of Social Media by Western European Hospitals: Longitudinal Study | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
Background: Patients increasingly use social media to communicate. Their stories could support quality improvements in participatory health care and could support patient-centered care. Active use of social media by health care institutions could also speed up communication and information provision to patients and their families, thus increasing quality even more. Hospitals seem to be becoming aware of the benefits social media could offer. Data from the United States show that hospitals increasingly use social media, but it is unknown whether and how Western European hospitals use social media.


Objective: To identify to what extent Western European hospitals use social media.
Methods: In this longitudinal study, we explored the use of social media by hospitals in 12 Western European countries through an Internet search. We collected data for each country during the following three time periods: April to August 2009, August to December 2010, and April to July 2011.


Results: We included 873 hospitals from 12 Western European countries, of which 732 were general hospitals and 141 were university hospitals. The number of included hospitals per country ranged from 6 in Luxembourg to 347 in Germany. We found hospitals using social media in all countries. The use of social media increased significantly over time, especially for YouTube (n = 19, 2% to n = 172, 19.7%), LinkedIn (n =179, 20.5% to n = 278, 31.8%), and Facebook (n = 85, 10% to n = 585, 67.0%). Differences in social media usage between the included countries were significant.


Conclusions: Social media awareness in Western European hospitals is growing, as well as its use. Social media usage differs significantly between countries. Except for the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, the group of hospitals that is using social media remains small. Usage of LinkedIn for recruitment shows the awareness of the potential of social media. Future research is needed to investigate how social media lead to improved health care.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Telemedicine forecast: Mobile and clouds with a strong chance of video

Telemedicine forecast: Mobile and clouds with a strong chance of video | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

Telemedicine applications for healthcare providers can be seen in how some corporations provide care for their workers. Consider how Cisco Systems [2] (NASDAQ:CSCO [3]) offers employees healthcare on its campuses on opposite ends of the country.

 

Cisco, which is self insured, funds all of the company’s healthcare resources including a clinic and pharmacy at its Silicon Valley headquarters. Patients with skin conditions, for example, can take advantage of teledermatology options that give Cisco employees access to skin specialists without needing to leave campus, said Ash Shehata [4], Cisco’s senior executive director of healthcare business transformation for the Americas. These health IT capabilities mean diagnosis is done through video and the specialist’s opinion is sent to the patient’s primary care provider.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

EMR Blueprint: Future State Workflow; Design, Build and Validate; User Testing

Quick story to illustrate how one word, misunderstood and untested, can lead to tremendous challenges:


In a specialty practice, providers dictated their notes. They were assured that post-implementation, they would still be able to dictate. This made the providers happy. After go-live, providers dictated their notes as they always had, into portable tape recorders, and dropped the tapes off to be transcribed with the front desk assistant.

 

Providers grew very frustrated when, after a few days, their transcribed notes were not appearing in patients’ charts. After multiple help desk calls, visits from IT staff, some yelling and a few threats to unplug every machine here (that is a quote!)...still no resolution. The IT staff came to test the providers' computers and make sure that audio was working, sound files could be heard. Since they could, it was determined that it wasn’t an IT problem. Help desk ticket closed...those spoiled doctors...insert eyeroll here.

 

The problem? The IT understanding of dictation (speaking into a microphone attached to a PC so that a .wav file is created) and the providers understanding of dictation (speak into a separate recording device and have information transcribed) were very different. No one had validated the proposed workflow for dictation, agreed upon it and had it tested by those who would be using it. When IT tested it, it worked - for what they thought would happen. Providers were not given the opportunity to test, only placated and brushed aside.

 

It may sound obvious, but it is imperative to get users involved in the documentation of workflows and testing because they are the people who will be most impacted when misunderstandings arise. While it may be tempting to do whatever is necessary to make end users smile in the short term (or get them off your phone/out of your inbox) it is better for the organization in the long run to take the time to confirm and test the proposed workflows.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

New ONC guide explains EHR privacy, security to providers

Privacy and security take center stage in a new instructional guide unveiled by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT this week. The guide--a collaboration of ONC's Office of the Chief Privacy Officer and the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) Foundation--is designed to teach healthcare professionals about the roles of privacy and security in the use of electronic health records (EHRs) and in Meaningful Use.


The 47-page "Guide to Privacy and Security of Health Information" includes sections on Meaningful Use, security risk analysis, and working with health IT vendors, as well as a privacy and security action plan. In addition, it includes lengthy explanations of the HIPAA privacy and security rules.

 

The manual explains in detail the two core Meaningful Use Stage 1 requirements related to privacy and security. The first is the requirement that patients who request it be supplied with an electronic copy of their health information within three business days. This access is mandated by the HIPAA privacy rule, which is imbedded in the Meaningful Use criteria.


Providers who want government incentives for Meaningful Use of electronic health records also must conduct a security risk analysis of their EHRs, as required by the HIPAA security rule. The guide defines a security risk analysis and shows how to conduct it.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Imperfect Pediatrics

Pediatric practices are imperfect. With the help of technology, here's a list of what I envision in a more perfect pediatric practice.

 

Perfect Pediatrics Looks Something Like This:


Availability: I have open appointments in my schedule every single day for acute medical issues for patients that consider me their pediatrician. I imagine perfect availability boosted by easy access to scheduling (no sitting on hold for 20 minutes). I see it like this: a parent can wake up, realize that they need their child to be seen, go online to book an appointment or chat with a nurse, and come in to see me (or my nurse partner) the same/next day.


Online Advice & Content: I have an up-to-date online repository of health information for families to browse and review pediatric health information when necessary. This would include videos and written content on every single vaccine we give, developmental milestones for every wellness check we do, information on every medication I prescribe, links to AAP, CDC, or leading health institutions’ health guidelines, and parenting content that helps families navigate the web intelligently. There would be directions to credible websites on buying car seats or finding coupons to do so, buying diaper cream, using and dosing anti-fever medications, and stories from wise families detailing how they made decisions raising their children. We’d highlight disease-specific groups where families can connect with other families challenged by similar circumstances or similar medical conditions. And there would be stories from my practice panel that could be shared: we all want parent “pearls”–clips from families looking back at the things they would do if they did it all again–so those would be there, too. Instead of sharing this content over and over and over again each day, it would be produced over a series of months to fill the need for families and avoid redundancy for clinicians.


Team: My patients would be cared for by a team committed to them. Nurses, schedulers, lab technicians, and medical assistants who know them, care for them at each visit, and coordinate their care between visits or with specialists. Many visits for preventative pediatrics can be completed by someone other than me, and my patients would have access to the same set of of team when they needed a nurse visit, a school form completed, a growth check, or a reminder to return for a booster shot. The team would all have access to the family’s email or cell phone so they could reach families in opted to be contacted. This team would galvanize sincere partnerships between health care and family.


E-Visits, Video-visits & Two-Way Communication: A practice where all of my patients have access to me at reasonable intervals of time from the comfort of their home. I imagine functionality where families can stream 1-minute question videos asking for guidance or diagnoses, and where I can respond with 1-2 minute video answers. Further, I imagine a practice where follow-up care is completed online or by phone or Skype-type encounters. Where teens can follow-up on their depression from their smart phone and where they can get their HIV results by text. I imagine visits where we value each others’ time and geography appropriately.


Payment: A perfect practice has payers and insurers valuing what is most precious in a medical home–expertise, personal care, time, and follow-up. Perfect includes support for content online–where advice for prevention is paid for upon completion or in global billing charges, where a visit that takes 15 minutes by phone is reimbursed at the same rate as one that takes 15 minutes in the office. More generically, a payment structure where as a physician I’m incentivized to provide professional, efficient care at the highest quality. And where I’m not incentivized to bring patients into the clinic when unnecessary. Where I am incentivized to reach my patients in ways they prefer. Even more perfect, a system that values the time it takes to communicate and utilizes the technologies of our time to make it happen rapidly.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Social media and health care – Battle of the ages

Social media and health care – Battle of the ages | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
See which age groups are most likely to talk about their health care experiences on a social media channel.

 

As we are all becoming aware, there is not a place to hide when it comes to social media. Even if your organization isn't using social media, people are having conversations about you…without you. The health care industry is no exception, even though there continues to be a patient privacy issue within platforms like Facebook and Twitter.

 

In a recent study released by PricewaterhouseCoopers surveying 1,060 U.S. adults, 42 percent of consumers have used social media to access reviews of treatments or physicians while 25 percent have posted about their health experience.

 

When broken down by age, 54 percent of people between the ages of 18 and 24 and 41 percent of people between the ages of 25 and 34 post about their health care experiences on a social media channel, while only 14 percent of people aged 35 to 44 use social media to communicate about their health care experiences.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

How can doctors curb digital distractions?

It’s been said that losing weight is much harder than kicking cigarettes or alcohol. After all, because one doesn’t need to smoke or drink, the offending substances can simply be kept out of sight (if not out of mind). Dieting, on the other hands, involves changing the way a person does something we all must do everyday.

 

It’s no surprise, then, that reports of problematic doctor interactions with social media are popping up with metronomic regularity. When it comes to the smorgasbord of information coursing through those Internet tubes, increasingly, we all have to eat. And that makes drawing boundaries a challenge.

 

While most early reports on the perils of social media concerned inappropriate postings by physicians, a new hazard has emerged recently: digital distraction. On WebM&M, the AHRQ-sponsored online patient safety journal that I edit, we recently presented a case in which a resident was asked by her attending to discontinue a patient’s Coumadin. As she turned to her smart phone to enter the order, she was pinged with an invitation to a party. By the time she had RSVPed, she had forgotten about the blood thinner – and neglected to stop it. The patient suffered a near-fatal pericardial hemorrhage.

 

In a commentary accompanying the case, the impossibly energetic John Halamka, ED doctor and Harvard Med School’s Chief Information Officer, described all of the things that his hospital, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, is considering to address this issue.

 

It’s not easy: whereas the hospital owns the Electronic Health Record and can manage access to it, the vast majority of mobile devices in the hospital today – at BI and everywhere else – are the personal property of the users. So Halamka is testing various policies to place some digital distance between the personal and professional, including blocking personal email and certain social networking sites while on duty.

 

He’s even investigating the possibility of issuing docs and nurses hospital-owned mobile devices at the start of shifts, collecting them at the end.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Myths and Facts of EHRs

Myths and Facts of EHRs | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

As electronic health records (EHRs) and new online sharing and storing databases have become more widely implemented, there have been ongoing concerns regarding patient privacy. In a recent study from the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions, entitled Physician Perspectives About Health Information Technology, 22 percent of surveyed physicians cited privacy concerns as a barrier to EHR adoption.

 

According to a Wall Street Journal/Harris Interactive poll, the majority of Americans surveyed believe EHRs have the potential to improve U.S. healthcare and that the benefits outweigh privacy risks. Benefits such as improved care coordination and cost savings for patients should be taken into account.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Patient Engagement: The Pivotal Role of the Caregiver

Patient Engagement: The Pivotal Role of the Caregiver | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

“Patient engagement is more than patient satisfaction. It is patient involvement in every aspect…The patient engagement process consisted of my wife (the patient), myself (the caregiver) and our medical team. All worked hand-in-hand throughout. Rather than telling us what we would have to do, they explained our options.” -Rob Harris

 

So much has changed since 1990 when I first enlisted to be the primary caregiver to my wife.

I can personally attest that a different mindset has engulfed the medical universe.

 

As a “baby-boomer”, my parents raised me well. I learned to respect authority and my elders. I did not question those in charge. My parents, considered to be members of the “traditionalist” age group, grew up during the World War II era, when the military was not quite worshiped, but certainly revered.

 

Amongst their populations, authority was never to be questioned. Doing so would label the one doing so as a malcontent.

 

As a caregiver and a person in 1990, I believed in treating everyone with respect, which I still adhere to today. In 1990, I rarely, if ever questioned someone in authority. To me, those in the medical community stood side-by-side with our country’s political and spiritual leaders, military officers, and corporate executives.

 

The result? I did what I was told and did not question decisions made by those in charge. In other words, if I didn’t like what I was told, I learned to live with it.

 

Today, the Generation X and to a lesser extent, the Generation Y populations of younger leaders are influencing and reshaping society in significant ways.

 

Today’s generations grew up with computers, where vast amounts of knowledge are but a keystroke or two away. Hence, if they did not believe what they were told, they could go online and conduct research to determine the validity or legitimacy of the issue at hand. This next wave of professionals, we find, adheres to the philosophy, “Your title doesn’t impress me. Your knowledge and abilities are what will convince me to believe and follow you. If I don’t like what you have to say, I’m going to contradict you or, I’m going to check out and go elsewhere.”

 

Are they being disrespectful?

 

Not as far as I’m concerned. What they are being is “confident” and “independent thinkers.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

Enabling Patients to Be Part of Their Care

Enabling Patients to Be Part of Their Care | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

CMS now proposes that in 2014, hospitals receiving the billions of dollars of Stage 2 federal EHR incentive payments must provide patients with electronic access to their hospital discharge information within 36 hours of leaving the hospital.

 

CMS is not only asking hospitals to give patients reasonable access to their own current and actionable health information, but it’s also trying to help patients and families address the wasteful and dangerous rates of hospital readmission and failures in continuity of care that haunt American healthcare. But the American Hospital Association is arguing that “Establishing a web portal or other mechanism to provide patients online access to this magnitude of data is unrealistic and premature.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

IMPROVED PATIENT CARE WITH EMR…REALLY?

IMPROVED PATIENT CARE WITH EMR…REALLY? | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
Physicians are always seeking means to provide better care for their patients. Can an EMR actually help you do that? Yes, but I must offer one caveat. Unfortunately, EMR systems that fail to clear the efficiency hurdle sacrifice quality patient care as well as productivity. If you’re taking shortcuts just to get through the day because you EMR slows you down so much, then you’re probably not serving your patients as well as you would like. However, a well-designed user interface that allows you to work with efficiency can pave the way for better patient care because of the incredible information processing power of a computerized record system.

 

Access to information: Have you ever been forced to make a clinical decision without having access to patient data that might have made a difference in that decision? In a world where information is king, the ability to access clinical data electronically is a fantastic advantage. Electronic data is instantly accessible and is never lost or filed incorrectly.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

EHR Companies Need to Change, Fast

EHR Companies Need to Change, Fast | healthcare technology | Scoop.it

The first thing I noticed when I walked into the physician’s office were the tall cabinets filled with manila folders, tabbed with names and organized alphabetically. There were three of these cabinets, taking up the entire length of the back wall, filled with hundreds upon hundreds of patients’ records.

 

“I see you still have paper records. Do you plan on implementing an EHR anytime soon?” I inquired.

The doctor paused for a moment and said, “No, not really.” Surprised, I inquired why.

 

“Well, there are a couple of things holding me back. The first is cost. There’s an initial set-up fee, a maintenance fee, a technical support fee, a hardware and software fee. The fees just keep piling up and it isn’t sustainable for a small practice like mine. Second is compatibility. The local hospital here uses Epic, but we use an Allscripts based system for logging in patients. It’s not a full-fledged EHR, but the point is that it isn’t the same as Epic. There’s a lot of training involved in using all these programs, which means you need time to learn – time I don’t have.”

 

I shadowed him for the rest of the day, watching as he spent a good five minutes writing down pertinent information after every patient encounter. By the end of the day, I realized in the four hours that I had shadowed him, nearly an entire hour had been dedicated to writing. Wouldn’t an EHR (electronic health record) system make his workflow a lot smoother?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

The Electronic Medical Record Doesn’t Tell You the Story

The Electronic Medical Record Doesn’t Tell You the Story | healthcare technology | Scoop.it
Things are different now that we have the EMR, the electronic medical record. After two months of use, we’ve learned to our sorrow that these records don’t tell us stories that make cognitive sense. They offer information in endless lists.

 

Before the written word, people told stories. In every culture, around hearths and on journeys, they remembered and retold tales of great deeds, romance, and tragedy.

 

When we were medical students, we learned to present each case on rounds by telling the patient’s story. The story had well-defined elements: the current complaint, the background of genetics or misfortune that led up to the present, the investigation that might clinch the diagnosis, and the plan of action.

 

The best stories almost told themselves. The business executive fresh from a transatlantic flight presented with shortness of breath; VQ scan revealed a pulmonary embolism. The young woman with Marfan’s syndrome began exercising one morning and developed severe chest pain radiating to her back; the echo demonstrated aortic dissection.

 

Now, however, we have lists.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by nrip
Scoop.it!

5 reasons why mHealth isn’t “telemedicine without wires”

“mHealth’s potential continues to grow, but roadblocks exist” is a Destination ATA editorial by Jeff Rowe that highlights a common misunderstanding of mHealth that I’m noticing amongst professionals with eHealth and Telemedicine expertise:

 

“But despite the seemingly daily introduction of new gadgets – and new uses for those gadgets – those who have been involved in telemedicine in recent years can be forgiven for viewing mHealth as essentially telemedicine without wires“

 

Here’s 5 reasons why I think mHealth isn’t just Telemedicine without wires:

 

> In the vast majority of instances Telemedicine was never personal

 

Typically it didn’t belong to the patient (eg. they were loaned it) or the Healthcare Professionals (eg. it was owned by their employer). In 2012 watch a Doctor or nurse at work and they’re looking or picking up their mobile every few minutes. Patients are more likely to leave their home without their keys or wallets than their mobile.

more...
No comment yet.

Would you like me to help you?

Please fill this short form and I will get in touch with you