The Future of Wellness & Healthcare
8.1K views | +1 today
Follow
The Future of Wellness & Healthcare
Where WELLNESS meets INNOVATION!
Curated by Art Jones
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Health care needs more physician CEOs like Atul Gawande

Health care needs more physician CEOs like Atul Gawande | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
To cure what ails health care, we need more physician CEOs like Atul Gawande who have an insider's familiarity with the medical world.
Art Jones's insight:

Excerpt: Dr. Atul Gawande, of Brigham and Women's Hospital, just started as CEO of a new health venture from Amazon, JPMorgan Chase, and Berkshire Hathaway.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

'It's going to create a revolution': how AI is transforming the NHS | Technology | The Guardian

'It's going to create a revolution': how AI is transforming the NHS | Technology | The Guardian | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
Technology is making impressive inroads into cancer treatment, saving lives and money
Art Jones's insight:

Excerpt: 

“Until we define where the tumor is and have defined the healthy tissues we want to protect, we cannot start the treatment,” says Jena. “This is the bottleneck. The quicker you get this done, the quicker you can get the patient into treatment.”

 

With artificial intelligence (AI), the painstaking task can be completed in minutes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Virtual Reality Neurosurgery

Virtual Reality Neurosurgery | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
A major hospital system is putting familiar 3D virtual reality technology into the hands of its pediatric neurosurgeons to help saves lives.
Art Jones's insight:

Virtual reality tools are helping surgeons simulate and plan complicated surgeries.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Art Jones from HEALTHCARE & SOCIAL MEDIA
Scoop.it!

How Social Media is Changing Medicine  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

How Social Media is Changing Medicine  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it

It is hardly news anymore to say that online communities like Facebook and Twitter are changing how the world works, but it may surprise you how these social media platforms are improving the health care that you receive. We often think that our physicians live in ivory towers that operate in a rarified atmosphere of intellectualism and rationality, but like all people they often have differences of opinion. When these arguments appear on social media, they can not only help advance the field of medicine but also provide valuable insights into how the medical community really thinks.

In most situations, physicians want to appear authoritative and assured. After all, it rarely helps patients to get medical advice from someone who seems uncertain about how best to proceed with their case. So, doctors rarely present more than one side of an issue, at least, in a clinical setting.

Unfortunately, only providing one opinion may help reassure patients, but it may not be the best way to treat a health condition. Like any field of study, medicine is constantly advancing and undergoing revision. What may have been rock-solid advice last year may be debunked by the latest investigative study. That is why listening to a wide range of medical experts on a particular topic of interest is so important—and one of leading forums for medical debate in the 21st century is social media.

How Twitter Has Changed the Medical Landscape

Before the advent of the internet, the medical community primarily reserved their spirited differences of opinion to private lounges, medical conferences and esoteric research journals. However, with new social media platforms that can bring together medical professionals from around the globe, many of these heated debates are entering a very public sphere. No longer can physicians pretend that they are a monolithic community speaking in one voice.

vmargineanu/BigStockPhoto.com

It may not seem like the ideal forum to discuss highly sophisticated medical matters with its limited character input and highly publicized interactions, but Twitter has become the platform of choice for medical debates. Like others in elite professions, the lure of abbreviated remarks easily punched in on a smart phone has made Twitter highly appealing, and like most Twitter discussions, those involving highly opinionated medical experts who are eager to tout their version of the “facts” often lead to denigrating the arguments of their adversaries—as well as them personally.

Although the language used by clinician and researcher participants may be more egalitarian than the pedestrian Twitter feud, the emotions are very similar. After being selected, trained and promoted for their intellect and passion for medicine, most physicians naturally have strong opinions on many health-related issues. That passion may translate into exceptional care in a clinical setting, but online it can be as rancorous and petty as any barroom confrontation.

Is Social Media a Viable Platform for Medical Debate?

There is considerable concern about the use of Twitter and other social media apps to discuss life and death issues that make up medicine. While many argue that these forums lower the level of debate by encouraging personal attacks and “trolling,” but there is also the undeniable fact that in the 21st century, online debate is the forum of choice for the majority of the public. It is true that much of the behavior would be considered unacceptable in other venues, but these digital spaces allow an unprecedented level of participation that foster unconventional input and honest dialogue.

Since launching in 2006, Twitter has exploded in popularity. In 2018, the total number of users on Twitter reached 336 million worldwide. While that is not as large as Facebook with it 2.2 billion users in 2018, Twitter offers real-time engagement that promotes honest and compelling discussion. This aspect of Twitter enables physicians and medical authorities from around the world to participate in emerging conversations and really influence important debates.

Doctors no longer have to travel to medical conferences to learn about the latest research or engage with prominent medical figures. Live tweeting allows speakers to disseminate their knowledge to all corners of the globe instantly and obtain feedback from the global medical community just as quickly. This can generate critical analysis in a fraction of the time it once did, as well produce cooperation on a global scale.

TeroVesalainen/BigStockPhoto.com

The Downside of Twitter

While many important discussions about medicine are being conducted on Twitter, there is some concern that social media is damaging the medical community. Many of the more spirited discussions can expose fault lines in the community that may center on sexism, ageism or other underlying issues. These issues have always been present in the medical community, but the advent of social media has shone an unflattering spotlight upon them. While it may color some medical professionals as biased, consciously or unconsciously, the medical community as a whole may benefit from publicly airing some of these taboo issues.

Another troubling issue related to Twitter of other social media is that people may say virtually anything. For the typical person who doesn’t have advanced degrees in medicine or biology, it is easy to become confused and walk away with the wrong message about a pressing health matter. Often this results in ignoring a physician’s advice or taking time away from a busy doctor’s schedule when they have to correct a mistaken impression. This may even lead to serious health complications if a patient is unwilling to listen to reason.

Finally, there is the concern with patient privacy. Many patients are eager to obtain medical advice online and may divulge sensitive information in an effort to get it. This may lead to privacy infractions by a responding physician which could prove problematic if it violates HIPAA or other regulations. There is also the concern that any advice provided online may be misinterpreted by other patients, putting their health at risk and putting the advisor in legal jeopardy.

To learn more about how the medical community is using social media, please contact Boost Health Insurance and speak with a licensed health insurance agent.


Via Plus91, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Art Jones's insight:

Is Social Media a Viable Platform for Medical Debate?

Excerpt: Listening to a wide range of medical experts on a particular topic of interest is so important—and one of the leading forums for medical debate in the 21st century is social media.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

3D-printed artificial heart beats just like the real thing

3D-printed artificial heart beats just like the real thing | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
​The devices currently used to pump blood around the body in lieu of a healthy heart have their drawbacks. With this in mind, scientists have now developed a silicone heart that beats much like the real thing, something that could provide a safer and more comfortable way to keep the blood pumping. ​
Art Jones's insight:

The best thing is listening to someones heartbeat, and knowing it is beating because of you. Anonymous

 

Excerpt: In testing the device, the researchers used a fluid with similar viscosity to human blood and found that fundamentally, it functioned in a similar way to a human heart. There is one pretty serious limitation, however, in that the material can only withstand around 3,000 beats which equates to around 30 to 45 minutes of usage. With that said, the team says this proof of concept shows a possible path forward when it comes to artificial hearts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Next-gen population health: mHealth, social determinants, prescriptive analytics

Experts share insights about where pop health technology and tools are headed in the immediate future.
Art Jones's insight:

Population Health

 

Excerpt: “There are now scientifically supported smartphone apps to help manage type 2 diabetes, asthma, clinical depression and other disorders,” he said. “Provider organizations that do their homework and separate the digital snake oil from apps that are supported by good evidence will find the right apps will help them provide more cost-effective care across at-risk populations in their care.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Rx: Zucchini, Brown Rice, Turkey Soup. Medicaid Plan Offers Food As Medicine

Rx: Zucchini, Brown Rice, Turkey Soup. Medicaid Plan Offers Food As Medicine | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
A small group of insurers offers some members with serious illnesses medically tailored meals to improve their health.
Art Jones's insight:

Improving Patient Outcomes = Food As Medicine

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Strength training builds more than muscles

Strength training builds more than muscles | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
Most of us know that strength training (with free weights, weight machines, or resistance bands) can help build and maintain muscle mass and strength. What many of us don't know is that strong muscles lead to strong bones. And strong bones can hel
Art Jones's insight:

Numerous studies have shown that strength training can play a role in slowing bone loss, and several show it can even build bone. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Taking the Pulse of Innovation in Healthcare

Taking the Pulse of Innovation in Healthcare | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
We hear the term digital transformation everywhere these days it seems. Its meaning has extended far beyond a term used to describe a shift in processes, to become a new way of thinking and conceiving fresh possibilities.
Art Jones's insight:

Healthcare in the Cloud

Excerpt: Despite much fear-mongering “the shift to the healthcare Cloud is inevitable and rapidly taking shape” says research firm Markets and Markets. Their findings show the global healthcare cloud computing market is forecast to reach $9.48 billion by 2020, up from just $3.73 billion in 2015.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

The Strategic Lies of Oncologists - The New York Times

The Strategic Lies of Oncologists - The New York Times | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
Is it ethical to break cost-controlling rules for a patient’s benefit?
Art Jones's insight:

What would you do?

 Excerpt:  What does the scant literature on the phenomenon of falsification tell us? A 1999 study, “Lying for Patients: Physician Deception of Third-Party Payers,” argues that it has characterized medicine, inside and outside cancer care, for some time.

 

The authors document doctors’ willingness to dissemble in areas ranging from coronary bypass surgery to mammography screening. “Many physicians sanction the use of deception to secure third-party payers’ approval of medically indicated care,” they wrote.

 

Physician subterfuge, the article concludes, reflects friction between “the traditional ethics of patient advocacy and the new ethic of cost control that restricts patient and physician choice in the use of limited resources.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

How heavy use of social media is linked to mental illness - Daily chart

How heavy use of social media is linked to mental illness - Daily chart | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it

Roughly a quarter of British adults have been diagnosed at some point with a psychiatric disorder, costing the economy an estimated 4.5% of GDP per year.

Art Jones's insight:

Social Media induced fear of missing out (FOMO) can cause a host of wellness & health related challenges. Youngsters report problems with anxiety, depression and sleep.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Violence Against Women and Girls: Let's Reframe This Pandemic | Alice Han | TEDxBeaconStreet

Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is a global pandemic that threatens their health. Yet health systems worldwide often do not recognize VAWG as
Art Jones's insight:

Reframing the conversation

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Gaming addiction classified as mental health disorder by WHO | Reuters

Gaming addiction classified as mental health disorder by WHO | Reuters | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
LONDON - Many parents already have concerns, but some may now have a new argument for limiting their children's 'screen time' - addiction to video games has been recognised by World Health Organization as a mental health disorder.
Art Jones's insight:

Excerpt: The WHO’s International Classification of Diseases (ICD), a reference bible of recognized and diagnosable diseases, describes addiction to digital and video gaming as “a pattern of persistent or recurrent gaming behavior” that becomes so extensive it “takes precedence over other life interests”.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Make the Hospital Come to You – NEO.LIFE –

Shirley, an elderly woman with chronic lung disease, had just returned home after a month in the hospital and a rehab facility following hip surgery. Her two daughters who’d been caring for her were…
Art Jones's insight:

Being in the hospital isn't the only way to receive 24 x 7 care.

 

Excerpt: 

It says a lot about the economics of operating a hospital that this model can make sense even with the costs of transporting people and equipment in and out of patients’ homes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Record-Breaking $3.4B Fuels Digital Health in First Half of 2018 | Healthcare Analytics News

Record-Breaking $3.4B Fuels Digital Health in First Half of 2018 | Healthcare Analytics News | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
Why investors are committing to healthcare’s digital transformation.
Art Jones's insight:

Digital health funding is set to reach 6.9 billion for the year 2018

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Art Jones from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Importance of Social Media in Healthcare, Healthcare companies

Importance of Social Media in Healthcare, Healthcare companies | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it

Over time, the Internet and social media have had a great impact on healthcare and medicine. It is now being used by individuals and businesses to communicate, stay connected, and even market or buy/sell products or services. The use of social media in healthcare has skyrocketed in the recent years. Healthcare companies are now turning to social media platforms to promote awareness, encourage patient engagement, and enhance accurate health messaging. Some of the social media platforms available to healthcare companies include social networking sites, wikis, blogs, microblogs, media-sharing sites, and VR and gaming environments. Here are some of the ways that social media in healthcare is helping healthcare managers enhance their services and stay connected with the patients:

Information sharing

One of the main motives of social media is to help users access information quickly and communicate with one another easily. The use of social media in healthcare is helping healthcare companies in sharing general healthcare tips and information with patients. Sharing news regarding outbreaks or health hazards is an effective way for healthcare facilities to provide accurate information to patients Healthcare companies can also use social media to reply to customer queries. Relying on social media in healthcare is also helpful to keep the public updated on the latest medical technology, deliver generic pre- and post-operative care information, and introduce new doctors on social networks.

Quality benchmarks

Setting benchmarks is an essential step in measuring and improving the performance of any company. Medical professionals can leverage the use of social media in healthcare to evaluate competitors and gain insights into the services they offer.  By taking a look at different practices and their social media involvement, companies in the healthcare industry have the ability to mimic these methods to enhance their own. Furthermore, the use of social media in healthcare can provide doctors and physicians with immediate or real-time responses from individuals to help understand common reactions to medications, as well as an overall consensus from patients on innovations in the healthcare industry

Training

Several healthcare companies have begun to utilize social media channels as a part of their training process. Trainees are encouraged to use particular hashtags on Twitter or join certain groups to engage one another during training sessions. This makes the training process more enjoyable and interactive. These training techniques provide trainees with a central location to ask questions and receive prompt responses. Social media gives participants the power to provide the trainers with immediate feedback on training sessions.

Communicate in crisis

In times of crisis, social media in healthcare can help provide minute-by-minute information to consumers. Through social media, hospitals and other medical organizations can deliver real-time updates on hospital capacity, operation status, and emergency room access. Moreover, having a strong and active social media presence facilitates healthcare companies to pass along information shared by organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control, the Red Cross, and or communicate with news outlets.


Via Plus91
Art Jones's insight:

Excerpt: Healthcare companies are now turning to social media platforms to promote awareness, encourage patient engagement, and enhance accurate health messaging. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Why Neuroscience Is Trending in Business

Why Neuroscience Is Trending in Business | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
Neuroscience is trending in business as neuroscientist Jordan Amadio helps start the world's first neurotechnology accelerator, NeuroLaunch.
Art Jones's insight:

The global neuroscience market is expected to reach $30.8 billion US dollars by 2020 according to estimates from Grand View Research. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Layoffs at Watson Health Reveal IBM’s Problem with AI - IEEE Spectrum

Layoffs at Watson Health Reveal IBM’s Problem with AI - IEEE Spectrum | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
Axed engineers say IBM isn't always smart about artificial intelligence
Art Jones's insight:

Hello Watson, Hang in there. We expect big things from you!

 

Excerpt:  “IBM Watson has great AI,” one engineer said, who asked to remain anonymous so he wouldn’t lose his severance package. “It’s like having great shoes, but not knowing how to walk—they have to figure out how to use it.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Is Public Engagement A Duty for Scientists?

Is Public Engagement A Duty for Scientists? | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
Do scientists have a responsibility to make their work accessible to the public? “Public Engagement”, broadly speaking, means scientists communicating about science to non-scientists. Blogs are a form of public engagement, as are (non-academic) books. Holding public talks or giving interviews would also count as such. Recently, it has become fashionable to say that it …
Art Jones's insight:

Excerpt: Not all scientists find themselves in a position where they can safely and effectively speak up on issues of public importance, and that’s OK. I think those who are in such a position have a responsibility to speak out, but I would not characterize this as a duty for ‘public engagement’. I would say it’s a more basic human responsibility: if you know about something that affects peoples’ lives, you should share it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Google’s Masterplan for Healthcare

Google’s Masterplan for Healthcare | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
The search engine’s parent company, Alphabet takes its move into medicine seriously. We looked at it thoroughly what Google in healthcare looks like.
Art Jones's insight:
My Apple health chatbot referred me to the Amazon hospital where I got Google drugs
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Spinach leaves can carry blood to grow human tissues

Learn more: http://wpi.today/spinach-yt-17 | WPI research team shows spinach leaves stripped of plant cells can become a vascular network to deliver blood
Art Jones's insight:

Wow, Just Wow!

 

Excerpt: Researchers from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) have transformed a spinach leaf into functional heart tissue. The team’s goal was to recreate human organ tissue down to the fragile vascular networks of blood vessels it can’t survive without. Scientists had previously attempted to 3D print intricate vascular networks without success. This breakthrough could mean that the delicate vascular systems of plants are the key.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Medical Internet of Things and Big Data in Healthcare

Medical Internet of Things and Big Data in Healthcare | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
A number of technologies can reduce overall costs for the prevention or management of chronic illnesses. These include devices that constantly monitor health indicators, devices that auto-administer therapies, or devices that track real-time health dat
Art Jones's insight:

Excerpt: A new category of "personalized preventative health coaches" (Digital Health Advisors) will emerge. These workers will possess the skills and the ability to interpret and understand health and well-being data.

 

They will help their clients avoid chronic and diet-related illness, improve cognitive function, achieve improved mental health and achieve improved lifestyles overall. As the global population ages, such roles will become increasingly important

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Lisa Russell (Film director): Responsible storytelling & changing the narrative of global health

At the ISNTD Festival 2018, Lisa Russell, film director at Lisa Russell Films, speaks about her experiences in global health storytelling and her innovativ
Art Jones's insight:

The Power of Multi Dimensional Storytelling & Global Health

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Ellen Pao on the Perverse Incentives Helping Incels Thrive at Tech Companies

Ellen Pao on the Perverse Incentives Helping Incels Thrive at Tech Companies | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
Incels are well-represented at tech companies, raising challenging ethical issues for leaders who want to create a safe workspace.
Art Jones's insight:

Is the INCEL movement becoming a mental health challenge?

 

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Art Jones
Scoop.it!

Why the Medical Research Grant System Could Be Costing Us Great Ideas - The New York Times

Why the Medical Research Grant System Could Be Costing Us Great Ideas - The New York Times | The Future of Wellness & Healthcare | Scoop.it
Funding is harder to find in general, and the current approach favors low-risk research and proposals by older scientists and white men.
Art Jones's insight:

The State of Medical Research

The current approach favors low-risk research and proposals

more...
No comment yet.