Healthcare Marketing
30 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Marketing Masters from Pharma Marketing
Scoop.it!

ePharma Summit: Health Care Pros Staying Informed Through Social, No Matter How Skeptical

ePharma Summit: Health Care Pros Staying Informed Through Social, No Matter How Skeptical | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it

Via COUCH Medcomms
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marketing Masters from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Four Trends for Social Media in Healthcare in 2014

Four Trends for Social Media in Healthcare in 2014 | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it

Have you sent a Tweet to your local hospital yet? Don’t laugh – 64% of hospitals are already using Twitter.*

Many of the trends that healthcare is seeing in Twitter and other social media platforms will become more mainstream in 2014. The payoff will be great - hospitals and doctors will be able to build stronger relationships with their customers.

These are four top trends I think will emerge in 2014 and beyond for social media in healthcare.

Patient engagement – 41% of patients say that social media affects their choice of provider in some way*. More providers will realize this and use social media to do a better job of communicating with patients with things like ER wait times, community crisis information and even live Tweets of medical procedures.DIY Health Sites – More patients are taking a do-it-yourself approach to their treatments, and looking to connect with sites that can offer guidance. Health care providers will step in to this role increasingly in 2014.

“Edutainment” sites - There is also a growing trend of online sites that offer health and wellness tools, or “edutainment.” These sites put a fun spin on steps we can take to keep healthy, like tracking exercise or diet. More healthcare providers will roll out their own sites so they can better connect with their patients. It’s a $1.7 billion industry that’s projected to reach $6 billion by 2015*.

Predicting Trends – The next big thing will be predictive analytics. In the not-too-distant future, healthcare providers will be able to use people’s conversations online to predict large scale health events, like flu outbreaks. By having this knowledge available, health systems will be better able to prepare with staffing and supplies before their clinics become swamped with sick people.


Via Plus91
more...
Homeopath Doctor's curator insight, April 1, 2014 2:14 AM

pre-menstrual syndrome Treatment :: homeopathy doctor in jaipur, homeopathic Therapic Qualities, B.H.M.S  Specialist, Homeopathic charitable dispensary, Homoeopathic  hospital and research center.

Rescooped by Marketing Masters from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social Media in Healthcare: a Prescription for Success

Social Media in Healthcare: a Prescription for Success | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it

As social media became an accepted communications tool in recent years, it’s safe to say that the healthcare industry has been slower than most to adopt it, in spite of all of its intrinsic benefits. 

Why? There can be many factors, but Christina Thielst, a social media consultant and editor of a book from HIMSS entitledApplying Social Media Technologies in Healthcare Environments said the problem primarily can be attributed to media reports about security breaches and personal health information being leaked inadvertently via social media. 

Knowing that healthcare puts a lot of necessary emphasis on privacy and security, as outlined by HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act), it’s no wonder the industry was a little spooked. I think most industries were rattled initially, or at least they didn’t take social media seriously at first. I can remember thinking, “Is this really going to be something more than what teenagers use to communicate with one another?” (C’mon, you know you had the same thought in social media’s nascent stage.) 

However, now the healthcare industry has embraced social media, and as Thielst pointed out in a Healthcare IT News article entitled “Social Media Taking Hold in Healthcare,” there are three main reasons why. 

The most regular users of healthcare systems are, well, older, and they are finally getting used to social media tools. Most have gotten used to using them on a personal level, and now recognize that those same tools can be used beyond that application. Since marketing through more traditional outlets (such as newspaper advertising) has become more expensive and challenging with reduced audiences, hospital administrators have realized the advantages to social media.Media stories about social media have gotten better. And, organizations like the American College of Healthcare Executives and HIMSS have been putting a lot of effort into teaching healthcare executives the value of social media and how to use it.

One key area that social media has proved to be an invaluable tool in healthcare is in the patient-provider relationship.

Healthcare providers are seeing the advantages to a blog with helpful content that helps patients inform themselves and make decisions about their care. Or, using Facebook and YouTube to answer questions from the community or conduct live chats with experts from the healthcare organization, or to post a video about the right way to wear a bike helmet to prevent injury if involved in a bike accident. 

The possibilities are endless and healthcare providers are now understanding how it allows them to connect with their patients in an efficient and effective way.

Sometimes, it can help in a traumatic situation in which response time is crucial.  According to a US News & World Report article, when the Boston Marathon bombing occurred: “After reading about the marathon bombings on Twitter, trauma teams in Boston last year were able to ready themselves for surgery much sooner than they would have if they'd had to wait for a traditional news report.”

Some healthcare organizations have their nurses create professional Facebook and Twitter accounts separate from their personal accounts. Once their patients friend and/or follow them, the connection has been made. It allows them to have a personal connection with their patients beyond their stay or office visit, and a level of trust and respect is a natural result. 

In some cases, social media in healthcare in this sense can literally save a life. Ruthi Moore, director of nursing at the Navy-Marine Corp Relief Society, tells of an instance in that sameUS News article when one of her nurses saw a post from a veteran who was thanking everyone, and she became suspicious he was going to be doing something he shouldn’t. Instead of the standard phone call, she went right to his home explaining that she was in the neighborhood anyway. Her hunch proved right as when she got there, the man had a gun in his hand.  She was able to get him to give her the gun and remove the bullets.  Had she not found his post on Facebook, he might have committed suicide.

Though not always this dramatic, the benefits of social media are numerous in healthcare, and I think we have only seen the tip of the iceberg in terms of how it will continue to enhance the patient-provider connection. And, since providers are so time-strapped when you are in their presence, social media will allow them to extend their caring demeanor beyond the office visit or hospital stay. A true prescription for success.

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marketing Masters
Scoop.it!

As Pharma Slowly Opens Up, Patients Are Engaging Themselves

As Pharma Slowly Opens Up, Patients Are Engaging Themselves | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
Influential patients are reaching critical mass. What cant they do
Marketing Masters's insight:

“If patient engagement were a drug, it would be the blockbuster drug of the century and malpractice not to use it.”  Leonard Kish, chair of the marketing and communications group for the Collaborative Health Consortium, made this profound statement.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marketing Masters from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Patients, providers take innovative approach to social media

Patients, providers take innovative approach to social media | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it

Although some physicians and hospital leaders utilize social media platforms, many healthcare executives still express considerable skepticism. As a physician who uses various social media services to keep up on industry trends, I'm continually impressed by how innovative healthcare leaders and consumers use these tools in new and imaginative ways.

In late April 2014, Twitter announced it will allow researchers to data mine its archives of hundreds of million tweets to try to discover actionable correlations that can be of clinical utility.

According to the Health Informatics Forum, the following projects are now being conducted:

Boston Children's Hospital will explore how tweets can be used for foodborne gastrointestinal diseasesThe University of Twente in the Netherlands will study early detection of cancerA joint study by the University of California, San Diego and the City University of New York will try to establish the overall happiness of Americans in selected cities

 

Taking advantage of America's obsession with the March Madness college basketball single-elimination tournament, the physicians at eAJKD, the official blog of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases, invented a month-long game called NephMadness.

They aimed to:

Increase nephrology knowledgeBring more people into the kidney disease communityIncrease interest in nephrology by providers and patients

The teams in NephMadness were comprised of nephrology concepts that were developed and described by content experts. The field was divided into eight regions, each with a physician champion:

Toxins: Warren KupinMHypertension: George BakrisRenal replacement therapy: Glenn ChertowRegeneration: Stuart ShanklandAcute kidney injury: Sarah FaubelElectrolytes: Helbert RondonKidney stones: David GoldfarbBiologics: Jonathan Hogan

Players signed up to predict which concept would win each match up by filling out their brackets. Editors preselected the winners, and with each winner more medical content was posted to explain why one concept was more important than the other. For example, one game featured the JNC8 blood pressure guidelines versus the KDIGO guideline, with the JNC8 guideline from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute coming out on top.

NephMadness attracted 260 participants and resulted in numerous discussions on twitter. For the record, the player with the most accurate bracket was Carlos Machado.

Patients and families are also exploring new ways to use social media to cope with serious diseases. For example, University of Texas Linebacker Dalton Santos (@Daltonsantos78) used Twitter to raise more than $30,000 to help pay for his uninsured mother's aortic aneurysm surgery.

Another example of a patient's family using such crowdsourcing techniques raised serious ethical questions. When seven-year-old Josh Hardy suffered viral infections associated with his weakened immune system, Chimerix refused to allow his doctors to use their unapproved anti-viral drug brincidofovir. About 20,000 people signed an online petition and Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III tweeted to his 1.12 million followers under the hash tag #savejosh. The child eventually received the drug.

The Josh Hardy case sparked a spirited debate on social media. One person commented, "It's really not fair to the thousands of others that were turned down just because they didn't make a big public outcry."

Arthur Caplan, director of medical ethics at New York University's Langone Medical Center, summarized the situation by saying, "You couldn't get a more troubling and impossible-to-resolve moral dilemma than this one. It's a trade-off between the public good versus self-interest."

It looks like social media is here to stay, and its applications by providers and patients will be many and innovative. It also appears there are both benefits and unintended consequences, which will challenge all of us to rethink our ethics, curriculum, policies and laws.

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marketing Masters
Scoop.it!

Rep access continues to shrink

Rep access continues to shrink | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
Sales reps are experiencing even more limited physician access, according to a report by Chicago consultancy ZS Associates.
Marketing Masters's insight:

Sales reps are experiencing even more limited physician access, according to a report by Chicago consultancy ZS Associates.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marketing Masters
Scoop.it!

What's next in healthcare marketing: 6 trends to empower patients and drive loyalty

What's next in healthcare marketing: 6 trends to empower patients and drive loyalty | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
We’re more than halfway through 2014 and if your marketing plan isn't hitting the KPIs you put in place, maybe it’s time for a little refresh. Today’s healthcare consumer looks a little different
Marketing Masters's insight:

We’re more than halfway through 2014 and if your marketing plan isn't hitting the KPIs you put in place, maybe it’s time for a little refresh.

Today’s healthcare consumer looks a little different than say five years ago. Changes in healthcare delivery and insurance have fostered an environment for the healthcare consumer to take control of how and where their healthcare dollars are spent. Patients are searching for information and measuring services and providers on quality, cost and brand reputation much like any retail product or service. Marketers have to be prepared to translate their brand story into relevant two-way communication that supports the consumer’s habits.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marketing Masters
Scoop.it!

Pharma, tablets and e-detailing - a prescription for physician engagement - PMLiVE

Pharma, tablets and e-detailing - a prescription for physician engagement - PMLiVE | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
- PMLiVE
Marketing Masters's insight:

It's taken a while for our industry to get on board, but it appears that tablet detailing has finally arrived. One in three details is conducted via an iPad or similar device, according to Hall & Partners research, and of our clients that have yet to embrace this evolution most say they plan to do so soon.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marketing Masters
Scoop.it!

Apple makes its big Health move - PMLiVE

Apple makes its big Health move - PMLiVE | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
New iPhone and iPad app complemented by HealthKit tools for developers
Marketing Masters's insight:

From portable ECG readers to a multitude of fitness apps the iPhone has long been home to other companies' health tools, but now Apple finally has made its own big play into the health space.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marketing Masters
Scoop.it!

Social Media Meets Healthcare

Social Media Meets Healthcare | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
Today marks the official launch of HealthWorksCollective, our tenth community at Social Media Today. We're proud to take on another big, and globally significant business conversation: How to deliver quality healthcare to as ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marketing Masters
Scoop.it!

Social Media and Healthcare

Adventis Health: Making social media work for you in pharmaceuticals.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marketing Masters from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

How Physicians can Leverage Online Tools to Improve Marketing Strategies

How Physicians can Leverage Online Tools to Improve Marketing Strategies | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it

In today’s technological savvy world, it is not enough for a physician to rely on referrals or word of mouth to build a patient base. Running a private practice is a business, just like any other, and marketing is a key part of creating a connection not only with potential patients, but also with networking partners and collaborates. Consider some ways a physician can leverage online tools to expand his or her reach.

Hospital Websites

Becker’s Hospital Review points out a website is a critical business tool for hospitals. The relationship between a medical facility and a physician is symbiotic. Doctors can use this to their advantage when planning marketing strategies. The “Find-a-Doctor” database allows you to become part of the hospital community. You should check regularly to ensure your name appears in the hospital directory. Consider creating listings under the doctor’s name and name of the practice to increase the odds of a hit, too.

Physicians can use the hospital website to gain exposure in other ways, as well. Query the hospital administrator about guest blogging or writing an article for the newsletter. Volunteer for a social media Q and A. The more people who see your name in connection with the hospital, the better. Ask about paid ads either online or as part of the newsletter, too.

Directories

Add your name and practice to online databases such as Healthgrades.com or ZocDoc.com. These sites target searches to connect patients with physicians in their area. While you are at it, add a posting to business directories, as well. Google MyBusiness, for example, puts your name and practice on local maps. Other options include:

Yellow PagesMD.comYelpFoursquare

Social Media

Becker’s also states that patients between the ages of 18 and 24 rely on information from social media sites. Leveraging this form of communication will increase your access to lifelong patients and emerging families. Facebook and Twitter are obvious choices, but expand your social media horizons to include video options.

Film short discussions on current health care issues and post them to your YouTube channel. For example, a quick blurb about controlling blood pressure through diet or summer eating habits provides helpful information on a topic you can cover quickly. Ecommerce University suggests that videos under two minutes get the most views on YouTube. Tip: If the video is shorter in length, transcribe the video in the notes section for better SEO results.

Once you have videos uploaded, use your other social media and website assets to promote them. You can embed a video directly onto the practice’s Facebook page. Create discussion groups or a video blog with a comments section on the website to talk about current issues covered in the videos, too. The more personal you make it, the stronger the impact.

Don’t lose sight of the big picture when planning your marketing campaigns. The goal is to connect. Doctors can leverage a number of online tools to make that happen. Improving communication options though patient portals, dedicated social media pages and videos are practical, cost-effective approaches to physician marketing.

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marketing Masters from PHARMA NEWS, MULTICHANNEL & CROSSCHANNEL MAKETING
Scoop.it!

Pharmaceutical Field - eDetailing and how it affects you

We’ve all heard about it,but what exactly is it? And how will it impact the work of medical representatives? Dr Andree K Bates takes a detailed look at the various forms of eDetailing.
eDetail...

Via eMedToday, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marketing Masters
Scoop.it!

Should companies in the healthcare sector use social media ...

Should companies in the healthcare sector use social media ... | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
For some industries like travel, beauty and fashion, the advent of social media has been a marketing match made in heaven. Brands have cashed in on the narcissistic post and boast culture we now live in, offering endless ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marketing Masters
Scoop.it!

Pharma Rep Access Down 33 Per Cent Since 2008

Pharma Rep Access Down 33 Per Cent Since 2008 | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it

The steady decline of pharmaceutical sales representative access to physicians is spreading to previously rep-friendly specialties, says the ZS Associates spring 2014 AccessMonitorT report.

Marketing Masters's insight:

Overall access to physicians has declined by 33 per cent since the first report in 2008. Approximately half (49 per cent) of physicians in the U.S. placed moderate-to-severe restrictions on visits from pharma sales reps in 2014.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marketing Masters
Scoop.it!

What Does E-Detailing Entail? How E-Detailing is Shaping the Pharmaceutical Industry | Pharmafile

Pharmafile.com is a leading portal for the pharmaceutical industry, providing industry professionals with pharma news, jobs, events, and service company listings.
Marketing Masters's insight:

E-detailing has come at a time of great change in the pharmaceutical industry. The economic recession hit hard with pressure from shareholders, insurance companies and regulatory bodies on pharmaceutical firms to constrict their spending across the board. This unfortunately meant the lay-off of many sales reps who were once the backbone of the sales force. Today, although the future still looks grim for sales reps, e-detailing is a much needed solution for pharmaceutical firms looking to connect with physicians in a more efficient manner.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marketing Masters
Scoop.it!

Communiqué to sales reps: With today's docs, it's the medium and the message

Communiqué to sales reps: With today's docs, it's the medium and the message | Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
Marketing Masters's insight:

Almost half of doctors bar their doors to pharma sales reps some way, somehow. What with all the talk about rep access to physicians, that state of things may seem quote-unquote normal. But it's not. Just 6 years ago, the numbers were quite different.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marketing Masters
Scoop.it!

The Future of Healthcare: Where will we be in 2023?

Predicting the future of healthcare is virtually impossible. However, we're leading the way in areas like intelligent and regenerative medicines, personalize...
more...
No comment yet.