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Partners Healthcare links mHealth data to its EMR | mHIMSS

Partners Healthcare links mHealth data to its EMR | mHIMSS | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it

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Sam Stern's curator insight, June 22, 2013 10:51 AM

Excellent News.

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The Consumerization Of Digital Health Care | TechCrunch

The Consumerization Of Digital Health Care | TechCrunch | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it

In this week's episode of Ask A VC, Mayfield Fund Managing Director Navin Chaddha sat down in the hot seat to answer reader questions. 

In particular, Chaddha addresses a trend he calls the “consumerization of health care,” in which technology is empowering patients to become consumers of their medical and health care. Mayfield has invested in a number of startups in the space, including dental services marketplace Brighter, wearable health tracking device developer Basis, and health network HealthTap.


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7 Healthcare IT Roles That Are Transforming Tech Careers

7 Healthcare IT Roles That Are Transforming Tech Careers | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
Healthcare IT is becoming one of the fastest growing areas in the job market as health service providers rush to get compliant and adopt new technologies.

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Rita Lagana's curator insight, November 2, 2013 1:42 PM

Interesting IT Careers in Healthcare industry.

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IBM's Watson closes its first piece of healthcare business

IBM's Watson closes its first piece of healthcare business | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it

IBM’s Watson first role in frontline healthcare will be to serve as a combination lung cancer specialist and expert in the branch of health insurance known as utilization management.

 

Thanks to a business partnership among IBM, Memorial Sloan-Kettering and WellPoint, health care providers will now be able to tap Watson’s expertise in deciding how to treat patients.

 

Pricing was not disclosed, but hospitals and health care networks who sign up will be able to buy or rent Watson’s advice from the cloud or their own server. Over the past two years, IBM’s researchers have shrunk Watson from the size of a master bedroom to a pizza-box-sized server that can fit in any data center. Processing speed has been improved by 240%. Now what was once was a fun computer-science experiment in natural language processing is becoming a real business for IBM and Wellpoint, which is the exclusive reseller of the technology for now. Initial customers include WestMed Practice Partners and the Maine Center for Cancer Medicine & Blood Disorders.

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The Promise of Big Data in Healthcare - Intel Communities

The Promise of Big Data in Healthcare - Intel Communities | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
There's little doubt that large amounts of relevant information put to good use and analyzed—otherwise known as clinical analytics—has the potential to improve both the delivery of care and the health and wellness of ...
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Technology Adoption Trends by Medical Practice Size | Physicians Practice

Technology Adoption Trends by Medical Practice Size | Physicians Practice | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
How does your technology use compare to practices of similar sizes? Here's your chance to find out.
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Healthcare IT professionals you should follow on Twitter - eHealth

Healthcare IT professionals you should follow on Twitter - eHealth | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
My focus in tweeting is health IT, health care social media, mHealth and apps, innovation in healthcare, conferences I attend, articles I read (newsletters and journals) and some notable Cleveland Clinic news.
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Healthcare IT market destined to boom in the coming five years - ZDNet

Healthcare IT market destined to boom in the coming five years - ZDNet | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
Healthcare IT market destined to boom in the coming five years
ZDNet
Healthcare IT isn't one monolithic market, though.
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HIMSS Analytics Reports Maturation in EMR Solutions Market - HealthTechZone

HIMSS Analytics Reports Maturation in EMR Solutions Market - HealthTechZone | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
HIMSS Analytics Reports Maturation in EMR Solutions Market
HealthTechZone
According to a study recently released by HIMSS Analytics, 65 percent of physicians do not plan to purchase, replace or upgrade their ambulatory EMR solutions.
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How mHealth tools help one facility provide faster, better care - FierceHealthIT

How mHealth tools help one facility provide faster, better care - FierceHealthIT | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
How mHealth tools help one facility provide faster, better care
FierceHealthIT
Here at Montefiore Medical Center we incorporate leading-edge healthcare technology systems.
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Bizarre things we could do with medical technology but probably ...

Bizarre things we could do with medical technology but probably ... | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
It made me think that there are many things already here or around the corner that medical technology could do, but probably shouldn't. Let's start with living a thousand years. I'm not sure that I would really want to.
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Systems should put focus on best outcomes, not high-tech equipment - ModernHealthcare.com

Systems should put focus on best outcomes, not high-tech equipment ModernHealthcare.com When it comes to deploying advanced technology—the latest imaging machinery, ever more precise radiation beams, tiny cameras that peer into the inner workings...
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Infographic: See how eHealth aids in home health care

Infographic: See how eHealth aids in home health care | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it

In the US, 70 percent of residents over age 65 will need long-term care in their lifetimes. The good news is that eHealth can help in monitoring health conditions. The bad news is that home-based-care staffing and turnover issues jeopardize the care these patients need—things such as help bathing, dressing, eating, using the bathroom.


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eMedToday's curator insight, June 22, 2013 7:39 PM

There a huge over hang of health care needs and costs with the babyboomers. Clearly, mhealth can have a major impact in this area. Hosptials need to organize a support function that connects to the home for the old population

rob halkes's curator insight, July 15, 2013 3:29 PM

..

 

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Study finds increasing mHealth demand

Study finds increasing mHealth demand | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it

More and more Americans are keen on the idea of using mobile devices to better monitor their health, according to new survey findings released Tuesday.   

 

The survey, conducted by Harris Interactive and HealthDay, revealed that one-third of Internet-using adults expressed interest in using smartphones or tablets to make doctors appointments, receive medical test results of communicate with their doctors. 

 

Similar numbers of respondents were eager to use mobile phones and tablets for actual healthcare services, including monitoring blood pressure (38 percent) or blood sugar (32 percent). Out of all age groups from 18 through 65 and older, individuals aged 25-29 expressed the most interest in obtaining diagnostic tests using mobile devices. 

 

"This poll shows us that the public is interested in using these apps," said Titus Schleyer, head of the Center for Biomedical Informatics at Regenstrief Institute, in a press statement. "But the healthcare system has to make it easier for them to do it."  

 

Right now, many of these phone and tablet apps for these type of diagnostic tests are either just gaining traction or not yet available to consumers, researchers said.

 

Despite more than one-third of Internet users indicating an interest in using mobile devices to manage their health, the majority remain unconfident in the privacy capabilities of mHealth devices, specifically with protected health information.

 

Out of the 2,000 survey respondents, only 13 percent said they were very confident in the privacy of their medical information online. More than one-third indicated they were not very confident or not at all confident regarding mHealth privacy.    


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Healthcare shift spurs innovation | Healthcare IT News

Healthcare shift spurs innovation | Healthcare IT News | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
Healthcare shift spurs innovation | Healthcare IT News: Mary Mosquera is a Washington, D.C.-based Senior Edito... http://t.co/Wo38VgRluw

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Google Glass in the OR and in Medical Education: Becoming a Disruptive Technology

Google Glass in the OR and in Medical Education: Becoming a Disruptive Technology | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
It's not the first time I say Google Glass can be the biggest hit in medical technology this yeas, and now as the number of good examples is still rising, it's becoming more and more evident. Here ...
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Utilizing Collaboration for EMR Implementation

Utilizing Collaboration for EMR Implementation | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
Visual collaboration technologies can help connect geographically dispersed members of the Care Connectivity Consortium and enhance the collaboration experience.
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Attracted By Usability, Mobility, And Value, Over 4000 Medical Providers Have ... - Healthcare Technology Online (press release)

Attracted By Usability, Mobility, And Value, Over 4000 Medical Providers Have ...
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The internet of you: How wireless medical implants will change medicine - GigaOM

The internet of you: How wireless medical implants will change medicine - GigaOM | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
The internet of you: How wireless medical implants will change medicine GigaOM Giovanni de Micheli, director of the Institute of Electrical Engineering at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale in Lausanne, Switzerland, said safety concerns are already...
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My Top 7 Trends in Healthcare Technology (Part 1) | Albert Mo

My Top 7 Trends in Healthcare Technology (Part 1) | Albert Mo | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
I present to you my list of the Top 7 Trends in Healthcare Technology based on my personal experience on the field. I predict that these trends will be a driving force behind the innovation in healthcare technology for the ...
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Affiliation planning - Healthcare IT News (blog)

Affiliation planning - Healthcare IT News (blog) | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
Affiliation planning Healthcare IT News (blog) Many healthcare organizations are discovering that accountable care reimbursed via global captitated risk contracts requires more primary care physicians and a more tightly coupled delivery network...
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How Smartphones Are Trying to Replace Your Doctor (But Can't Yet)

How Smartphones Are Trying to Replace Your Doctor (But Can't Yet) | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it

For most of time medicine was a guessing game. Doctors, or witch doctors, or shaman would inspect a patient, stir a potion and hope it would work. With some notable exceptions, modern medicine isn't so different. The data collection—blood pressure, heart rate, weight, reflexes—is largely rudimentary. We're getting by, but technology can take us so much further.

 

Even technology that fits in your pocket.

 

In the past year or two (or three) iPhones and iPads have been a fixture in doctors' offices around the world. Why carry a clipboard when you could pull up records via Wi-Fi and type the information directly into the patient's medical record? Perhaps even more powerful is the idea that these devices can be collecting data all the time.

 

Smartphones are incredibly powerful tools for anything as simple as data mining to something so sophisticated as measuring a patient's sleeping pattern. There are apps that can help regulate your mental health, apps that can help you keep track of what and how much you eat. There are apps that can take your blood pressure and you blood sugar. There are even apps that help you cope with aging.

 

While an app can't cure a disease, some of the newer, more experimental medical apps can do truly extraordinary things. This technology can not only help you feel better; it can prevent illness by spotting symptoms early on.

 


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nancygabor's comment, June 5, 2013 1:07 PM
Collecting data is one thing, understanding what it means and when to bring concerns to your doctor is another. if the smart phone is the glove, the hand is health literacy... they have to go together. Early adopters are likely to have better health literacy early on, but to gain the full benefits of sensor technologies in mobile consumer devices, we need to make interpretive information available to patients. We also need to reimburse physicians for the time they spend trawling through patient data. Dominique is an unusual leading thinker... most docs don't trawl without a real incentive.
nrip's comment, June 6, 2013 5:44 PM
Tools made from data are helping doctors, patients and healthstaff who are willing to be helped. With time tools will improve as those who are building them will mature in their techno-medical skills. As doctors learn to accommodate these tools in their practices, they will mature in their understanding of how tools can be used to improve outcomes as well as improve paradigms of care.
IT-Lyftet och IT-Piloterna's curator insight, June 17, 2013 2:53 AM

Kan "smarta prylar" ersätta doktorer? Nä, naturligtvis inte, men det finns mycket att vinna på att rutinmässiga undersökningar kan utföras med hjälp av små, tekniska hjälpmedel, och utvecklingen går snabbt framåt.

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Healthcare IT: seeking better outcomes through smarter security ...

Healthcare IT: seeking better outcomes through smarter security ... | Healthcare IT Magazine | Scoop.it
If you examine the breaches of unsecured protected health information since late 2009, as reported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, you can see that more than 17,000 records have been exposed ...
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Siemens Healthcare Adopts EHR Developer Code Of Conduct - Healthcare Technology Online (press release)

Siemens Healthcare Adopts EHR Developer Code Of Conduct Healthcare Technology Online (press release) About Siemens Healthcare Sector The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world's largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter...
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