Healthcare Informatics
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Medicine's 4th Paradigm: The $100 Genome: Preparing for the Personalized Medicine Revolution

Medicine's 4th Paradigm: The $100 Genome: Preparing for the Personalized Medicine Revolution | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it
The $100 #genome in two years or less.Preparing for the #personalizedmedicine revolution http://t.co/SWcPjQ3k #HIT #bioinformatics #EMR...
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“Oh, what exactly is informatics?”

“Oh, what exactly is informatics?” | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it
by: Sue Brown, Director Clinical Informatics, CVS Caremark MinuteClinic A recent review on social media caught my attention. The book’s title? No One Understands You, And What...
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Perthera's unique approach to Personalized Medicine

Perthera's Chief Data Officer, Subha Madhavan, PhD describes in detail, what makes the Perthera process so unique.
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Using data to better predict the healthcare needs of the U.S. population could save between $300 and $450 billion

Using data to better predict the healthcare needs of the U.S. population could save between $300 and $450 billion | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it

Dr. Data is IN…

The U.S. spends more on healthcare than any other nation: around $9,000 per person in 2012. Can data scientists help?

The technology that’s already increased retail revenues and made law enforcement more effective could enhance healthcare providers’ business, by improving patient outcomes and lowering costs.

What’s the future of big data in healthcare?

According to the McKinsey Global Institute, using data to better predict the healthcare needs of the U.S. population could save between $300 and $450 billion.

One of those at the forefront of the industry, with over 20 years’ experience of developing clinical analytics, is John McDaniel, practice leader for the U.S. Healthcare Provider Market at NetApp. He sees four key trends:

 

1. The Patient Data Warehouse
By 2015, the average hospital will have two-thirds of a petabyte (665 terabytes) of patient data, 80% of which will be unstructured data like CT scans and X-rays.

“It’s eye opening that the human body needs so much storage,” McDaniel told me. When it comes to streamlining healthcare, the important thing is to find a way to manage that data.

Already, Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) allow scans and X-rays to be shared seamlessly across departments. For example, when my husband broke his finger, the diagnostic X-ray taken at one hospital was automatically available at the specialist unit at the hospital where he went for treatment.

According to McDaniel, a lot of that patient data is currently moldering in silos, because healthcare professionals lack the means to share it effectively. As big-data techniques become commonplace, it’s becoming easier to navigate these masses of data, and so cut down on the number of repeated tests and treatments.

 

2. Predictive Medicine
Our grandchildren will view personalized medicine the way we view antibiotics. It’ll be impossible—terrifying even—to imagine a time when patients were treated with a “one size fits all” drug for cancer, diabetes or heart disease because we didn’t know the risks from our genes and lifestyle.

Big data is ushering in an era of personalized medicine. In the realm of cancer treatment, we already know who should receive what drug for certain types of breast tumor, based on genetic markers.

According to McDaniel, monitoring the genomic markers that predict expensive diseases will soon allow healthcare providers to provide earlier treatment to mitigate or even totally eradicate the risk of some cancers and other chronic or deadly diseases.

 

3. Wellness Maintenance
It doesn’t end there. Big data can unlock the patterns of risk factors—both genetic and behavioral—that lead to higher rates of some diseases in some people, and guide them to make the lifestyle and medication changes that will keep them well.

For example, McDaniel is working with a concierge practice to deliver a groundbreaking wellness-maintenance service. By keeping a close eye on markers for the “big ticket” illnesses like diabetes, congestive heart failure, and dementia, the practice can ensure that the patient is staying healthy through diet, activity and preventative medicine:

“If a patient with one of these illnesses carries on down an unchecked path then the cost will be between $1.5 and $3.5 million per patient.”

Accountable care organizations are leading the push towards more proactive, personalized health management—going so far as to help their customers to not get sick. According to the McKinsey Global Institute, better targeting of preventative healthcare messages to the right population at the right time could save $70-100 billion.

 

4. Just-In-Time Medicine
Obviously, treating patients at the wrong time and in the wrong place is costly. Scheduled care is much cheaper than unscheduled care. Today, the industry works hard to “maximize production,” but improved big-data analytics across the industry can help optimize it further.

 

Click the image to see how your body is a source of big data

Optimizing patient discharge timing could save up to $70 billion according to McKinsey. For example, hospitals have always struggled to find the right discharge time for patients. Too late, and the patient ties up valuable bed space; too early, and patient outcomes suffer (not to mention the costs of readmission via the emergency room).

McDaniel told me that big data can help here too. As well as clinical analytics, healthcare providers are increasingly looking towards analytics to manage patient throughput, triage cases, and make predictions at a population level. This allows providers to fine tune their resources so that they can provide what he calls “just in time medicine.”

As Dr. Ari Robicsek told Beckers Hospital Review recently: “We compute a patient’s risk of being readmitted. … A user can look at a panel of patients to see which patients are at risk—high, medium or low—of being readmitted in 30 days.”

Big data also promises to set benchmarks, ward to ward and state to state. The cost of everything from appendectomies to X-rays becomes transparent, improving competition and driving down costs. It’s estimated that there’s another $100 billion of savings possible here, too.

The Bottom Line
A hundred-billion here, a hundred-billion there: Pretty soon, you’re talking serious money.

With possible savings of 10% of the entire U.S. medical bill, insights from big data could be the prescription for better care, lower costs and higher productivity. Says John McDaniel:

 

“There’s no question. This is the future of healthcare.”

By Emma Byrne

 


Via Chatu Jayadewa
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Art Jones's curator insight, April 19, 2013 10:43 AM

Whats the future of BIG DATA in HEALTHCARE?

Gail Worthington-Eyre's curator insight, April 22, 2013 9:59 PM

Is Data the answer? Accountable care organizations are leading the push towards more proactive, personalized health management—going so far as to help their customers to not get sick. According to the McKinsey Global Institute, better targeting of preventative healthcare messages to the right population at the right time could save $70-100 billion. The future of healthcare really is CDC at all ages according to this report.

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Surge in healthcare data security spending drives search for lower cost data center site selection

Surge in healthcare data security spending drives search for lower cost data center site selection | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it
Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology,Health care information technology & IT strategy news for CIOs, CMIOs & clinical informaticists. Learn about EMR EHR, ARRA HITECH, wireless technologies & meaningful use policy.
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Personalised Medicine: Better Healthcare for the Future - A Rational Approach ... - Nature.com

Personalised Medicine: Better Healthcare for the Future - A Rational Approach ...Nature.comMary Baker – European Brain Council, María Berdasco – Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Stephane Berghmans – EMRC, Maurizio Botta –...
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Genetic Tests to Generate $25 Billion a Year, UnitedHealth Says

Genetic tests may become a $25 billion annual market in the U.S. within a decade, highlighting the need to identify which exams work the best, insurer UnitedHealth Group Inc. said.
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KLAS: EMR Functionality Gaps Examined

KLAS: EMR Functionality Gaps Examined | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it
Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology,Health care information technology & IT strategy news for CIOs, CMIOs & clinical informaticists. Learn about EMR EHR, ARRA HITECH, wireless technologies & meaningful use policy.
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Stepping Up to the Cloud

Stepping Up to the Cloud | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it
Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology,Health care information technology & IT strategy news for CIOs, CMIOs & clinical informaticists. Learn about EMR EHR, ARRA HITECH, wireless technologies & meaningful use policy.
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Precision Medicine Flourishes with Healthcare Big Data Analytics - Health IT Analytics

Precision Medicine Flourishes with Healthcare Big Data Analytics - Health IT Analytics | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it

Precision medicine is on the rise thanks to a number of initiatives and research projects harnessing healthcare big data analytics.


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The Ethics of Personalised Medicine

The Ethics of Personalised Medicine | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it
This book presents the views of leading researchers from across Europe and North America, from both normative and empirical disciplines, in the multidisciplinary debate on the current state of research on the ethical, legal and social implications...
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This Boston Startup Detects Your Demographics in Less Than a Second While You Shop

This Boston Startup Detects Your Demographics in Less Than a Second While You Shop | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it
Imagine if every time you strolled across a shop entrance on Newbury Street, your personal attributes – age, gender, race and more – were recognized and documented?
Relax. Sure, it’s a...

Via Carla Gentry CSPO
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Carla Gentry CSPO's curator insight, August 13, 2014 6:31 PM

You can try it out for yourself, using Google Chrome and a webcam, here.

“It’s not quite facial recognition but facial detection,” DeFilippi clarified. That being said, Jorge Torres, the company’s CTO and co-founder, had dabbled in the space prior to the spawning of the startup. DeFilippi, Torres and the third founder Adam Carrigan met at business school in Australia in 2011.

Ultimately, Real Life Analytics aims to sell its technology to retailers in monthly subscription packages. Chain stores and small boutiques alike could use the data to garner a better picture of their customers. Retailers could get a grasp on what type of consumer actually makes it to the point-of-sale, and which shoppers merely enter the shop to browse. That information might have an effect on how shops go about ordering their inventory.

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First volume of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia made public

First volume of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia made public | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it
The goal of cancer treatment is to match the right drug to the right target in the right patient.
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Can Personalized Medicine Improve Drug Safety? - InformationWeek

Can Personalized Medicine Improve Drug Safety? - InformationWeek | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it
Can Personalized Medicine Improve Drug Safety?InformationWeekSocial media, including sites such as PatientsLikeMe, can also be helpful for consumers sharing experiences about their bad--and good--outcomes related to medical treatments.
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Computational Intelligence in Bioinformatics (Studies in Computational Intelligence) – Arpad Kelemen download, read, buy online | e-Books

Computational Intelligence in Bioinformatics (Studies in Computational Intelligence) 8211 Arpad Kelemen download, r..
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Study: Small Medical Offices Adopting EHRs at Fast Rate

Study: Small Medical Offices Adopting EHRs at Fast Rate | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it
Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology,Health care information technology & IT strategy news for CIOs, CMIOs & clinical informaticists. Learn about EMR EHR, ARRA HITECH, wireless technologies & meaningful use policy.
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Demand for Clinical Informatics Growing Among Health Professionals: PwC - Health Care IT - News & Reviews

Demand for Clinical Informatics Growing Among Health Professionals: PwC - Health Care IT - News & Reviews | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it
A report by PwC reveals that health care organizations believe clinical informatics is a valuable tool for improving patient care.
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Health Professionals Demanding Clinical Informatics: PwC - Latest News

Health Professionals Demanding Clinical Informatics: PwC - Latest News | Healthcare Informatics | Scoop.it
A report by PwC reveals that health care organizations believe clinical informatics is a valuable tool for improving patient care.
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