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Researchers: Use of mobiles for health has not been fully explored

Researchers: Use of mobiles for health has not been fully explored | Healthcare | Scoop.it

“Mobile technology, with its diffusion and characteristics, holds a great potential for health care applications. However the use of mobile phones in health care delivery has not been fully explored, and the diverse outcomes of mHealth have barely been documented,” says a studyappearing in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

 

“Although some literature reviews cover one part or the other of the field, an overall picture is still missing, possibly due to the field’s constant evolution,” according to a team of Swiss researchers.

 

“Studies are becoming more theoretically sound,” corresponding author Maddalena Fiordelli, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute of Communication and Health at the University of Lugano, Switzerland, tells MobiHealthNews. “On the other hand,” she adds, “it seems that research is not keeping up.”

 

The volume of scientific research about mobile healthcare technology has grown as the field itself has exploded, but the quality and focus of academic studies has not kept pace with the speed of innovation, a review of 10 years’ worth of published literature suggests.

 


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Chanfimao's curator insight, June 4, 2013 4:40 AM

“Mobile technology, with its diffusion and characteristics, holds a great potential for health care applications. However the use of mobile phones in health care delivery has not been fully explored, and the diverse outcomes of mHealth have barely been documented,” says a studyappearing in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

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How Smartphones Are Trying to Replace Your Doctor (But Can't Yet)

How Smartphones Are Trying to Replace Your Doctor (But Can't Yet) | Healthcare | Scoop.it

For most of time medicine was a guessing game. Doctors, or witch doctors, or shaman would inspect a patient, stir a potion and hope it would work. With some notable exceptions, modern medicine isn't so different. The data collection—blood pressure, heart rate, weight, reflexes—is largely rudimentary. We're getting by, but technology can take us so much further.

 

Even technology that fits in your pocket.

 

In the past year or two (or three) iPhones and iPads have been a fixture in doctors' offices around the world. Why carry a clipboard when you could pull up records via Wi-Fi and type the information directly into the patient's medical record? Perhaps even more powerful is the idea that these devices can be collecting data all the time.

 

Smartphones are incredibly powerful tools for anything as simple as data mining to something so sophisticated as measuring a patient's sleeping pattern. There are apps that can help regulate your mental health, apps that can help you keep track of what and how much you eat. There are apps that can take your blood pressure and you blood sugar. There are even apps that help you cope with aging.

 

While an app can't cure a disease, some of the newer, more experimental medical apps can do truly extraordinary things. This technology can not only help you feel better; it can prevent illness by spotting symptoms early on.

 


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nancygabor's comment, June 5, 2013 1:07 PM
Collecting data is one thing, understanding what it means and when to bring concerns to your doctor is another. if the smart phone is the glove, the hand is health literacy... they have to go together. Early adopters are likely to have better health literacy early on, but to gain the full benefits of sensor technologies in mobile consumer devices, we need to make interpretive information available to patients. We also need to reimburse physicians for the time they spend trawling through patient data. Dominique is an unusual leading thinker... most docs don't trawl without a real incentive.
nrip's comment, June 6, 2013 5:44 PM
Tools made from data are helping doctors, patients and healthstaff who are willing to be helped. With time tools will improve as those who are building them will mature in their techno-medical skills. As doctors learn to accommodate these tools in their practices, they will mature in their understanding of how tools can be used to improve outcomes as well as improve paradigms of care.
IT-Lyftet och IT-Piloterna's curator insight, June 17, 2013 2:53 AM

Kan "smarta prylar" ersätta doktorer? Nä, naturligtvis inte, men det finns mycket att vinna på att rutinmässiga undersökningar kan utföras med hjälp av små, tekniska hjälpmedel, och utvecklingen går snabbt framåt.

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An ultrasonic body area network for implants

An ultrasonic body area network for implants | Healthcare | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University at Buffalo aredeveloping a “body area network” using ultrasonic waves and sensors to wirelessly share information between medical devices implanted in (or worn by) people to treat diseases such as diabetes and heart failure.

 

“This is a biomedical advancement that could revolutionize the way we care for people suffering from the major diseases of our time,” said Tommaso Melodia, PhD, UB associate professor of electrical engineering.

 

The idea of creating a network of wireless body sensors, also called a “body area network,” currently links sensors together via electromagnetic radio-frequency waves — similar to those used in cellular phones.

 

Radio waves have drawbacks such as the heat they generate, and because they propagate poorly through skin, muscle and other body tissue, they require relatively large amounts of energy, he said.

 

Ultrasound may be a more efficient way to share information, Melodia said, because roughly 65 percent of the body is composed of water. This suggests that medical devices, such as a pacemaker and an instrument that measures blood oxygen levels, could communicate more effectively via ultrasound compared to radio waves.

 

“Think of how the Navy uses sonar to communicate between submarines and detect enemy ships,” Melodia said. “It’s the same principle, only applied to ultrasonic sensors that are small enough to work together inside the human body and more effectively help treat diseases.”

 

Another example involves connecting blood glucose sensors with implantable insulin pumps. The sensors would monitor the blood and regulate, through the pumps, the dosage of insulin as needed in real time.

 


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jean-michel raimbault's curator insight, June 8, 2013 5:38 AM

A la fois génial et inquiétant...

David Dellamonica's curator insight, June 9, 2013 1:53 PM

For me, look like walking in mars. So important for many patients with chronic condition. It could be interesting to work on a global "map" of what is existing to day and what we can imagine for futur ....

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Clinical Data Standards and Data Portability

Healthcare is being pushed into the Information Age – the need for this was all-to- well known due to: –

Breaking up of economic divides –

Rising Consumerism –

Increasing Costs –

Safety Concerns•

 

Health care still is not taking full advantage of the information & communications technologies that have revolutionized other industries


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Data Analytics's curator insight, May 9, 2013 3:06 AM

Standardization of electronically documented information. Absolutely critical in the clinical application.

Kel Mohror's comment, September 20, 2013 6:59 PM
Health consumers have to demand their care providers ACT to take "full advantage of the information & communications technologies that have revolutionized other industries." Consumers must speak up and tell providers to get "up to speed" or lose their business. That attitude changed the auto industry; it can reform healthcare.
poojarajput's curator insight, October 9, 2013 7:03 AM

http://www.jagran.com/