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Supercomputer models one second of human brain activity

Supercomputer models one second of human brain activity | Healthcare | Scoop.it

The most accurate simulation of the human brain to date has been carried out in a Japanese supercomputer, with a single second’s worth of activity from just one per cent of the complex organ taking one of the world’s most powerful supercomputers 40 minutes to calculate.

 

Researchers used the K computer in Japan, currently the fourth most powerful in the world, to simulate human brain activity. The computer has 705,024 processor cores and 1.4 million GB of RAM, but still took 40 minutes to crunch the data for just one second of brain activity.

 

The project, a joint enterprise between Japanese research group RIKEN, the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University and Forschungszentrum Jülich, an interdisciplinary research center based in Germany, was the largest neuronal network simulation to date.

It used the open-source Neural Simulation Technology (NEST) tool to replicate a network consisting of 1.73 billion nerve cells connected by 10.4 trillion synapses.

 

While significant in size, the simulated network represented just one per cent of the neuronal network in the human brain. Rather than providing new insight into the organ the project’s main goal was to test the limits of simulation technology and the capabilities of the K computer.

 
Via nrip
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Just Mind's curator insight, January 14, 2014 9:47 AM

This show just how powerful the human brain truly is... very intriguing stuff.

Miro Svetlik's curator insight, January 15, 2014 3:40 AM

It is somehow comforting that we start performing this kind of tests. At least it places current infrastructure in perspective with what we will be facing in biocomputing if we dont change hardware. It would be really interesting to perform the same test on the supercomputer with neuromorphic chips but for that we have to wait a while I guess.

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Robots Let Doctors 'Beam' Into Remote Hospitals

Robots Let Doctors 'Beam' Into Remote Hospitals | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Remote presence robots are allowing physicians to "beam" themselves into hospitals to diagnose patients and offer medical advice during emergencies.

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Art Jones's curator insight, November 18, 2013 6:06 PM

#ROBOTICS

Emma Sands's curator insight, November 19, 2013 4:49 AM

Una opción efectiva para maximizar el "expertise" de los especialistas sin las barreras del mundo físico. Pero, ¿qué otras barreras habría que solucionar? ¿Contractuales? ¿Legales? ¿Costes iniciales?

Rescooped by Emma Cashmore from Welfare News Service (UK) - Newswire
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'Family Doctors' To Be Restored In New GP Deal

'Family Doctors' To Be Restored In New GP Deal | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Everyone over 75 will be assigned a named, accountable GP, as part of an "enhanced service" agreed by the Government and doctors.

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Rescooped by Emma Cashmore from healthcare technology
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Better Hearing Through Bluetooth

Better Hearing Through Bluetooth | Healthcare | Scoop.it

A new generation of products that utilize the latest wireless technology are offering promising alternatives for some people with hearing loss.

 

The devices which are classified as a personal sound amplifier product, or P.S.A.P., are designed to amplify sounds in a recreational environment.


Unlike hearing aids, P.S.A.P.’s are exempt from Food and Drug Administration oversight and can be sold as electronic devices directly to consumers, with no need to see a physician before buying one. They come with a range of features and vary widely in price.


And while some hearing professionals have long cautioned against the devices, citing their unreliability and poor quality, many also say that a new generation of P.S.A.P.s that utilize the latest wireless technology are offering promising alternatives for some people with hearing loss.


There are limitations to who can benefit. “A personal sound amplifier is really designed for patients who have normal or near normal hearing. It’s not really designed as a hearing device to address significant sensorineural hearing loss,” said Bettie Borton, the president of the American Academy of Audiology. It is also important that those with hearing loss be screened for potentially serious medical problems that may be causing the problem.

 

more at http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/01/15/better-hearing-through-bluetooth/


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Rescooped by Emma Cashmore from Welfare News Service (UK) - Newswire
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Loneliness: THOUSANDS visit their local surgery just because they are lonely, according to doctors

Loneliness: THOUSANDS visit their local surgery just because they are lonely, according to doctors | Healthcare | Scoop.it
Almost
half - 49% - of the doctors questioned in a survey said they were not confident they had the tools necessary to help their lonely patients

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