Healthcare and pharma in social media
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Apple’s Pact with 13 Health Care Systems Might Actually Disrupt the Industry

Apple’s Pact with 13 Health Care Systems Might Actually Disrupt the Industry | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
It could let health care data be used in innovative ways.
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Patient Engagement Survey: Social Networks to Improve Patient Health

Patient Engagement Survey: Social Networks to Improve Patient Health | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

In our most recent NEJM Catalyst Insights Council Patient Engagement Survey, “Social Networks to Improve Patient Health,” 99% of respondents acknowledge that social networks are potentially useful in health care delivery, especially for chronic disease management (named by 85% of respondents) and promotion of healthy behaviors such as weight loss, physical activity, and healthy eating (78%).

The NEJM Catalyst Insights Council members surveyed — composed of health care executives, clinical leaders, and clinicians — see significant opportunity to improve health by either building or leveraging existing social networks. The seminal research by the medical sociologist Nicholas Christakis shows the strong linkage of behaviors leading to obesity, smoking, and alcohol use within social networks.

Approximately three-fourths of Insights Council member respondents report their organization uses some type of social network as part of their care delivery initiatives, but 90% say these are not yet mature or only slightly mature.”

Facebook and other social media sites illustrate in everyday life the power of social connectedness and the influences individuals have on one another’s behavior. Historically, care delivery has focused exclusively on individual patients. Awareness is growing that social networks in health care, such as PatientsLikeMe and Connected Living, can help people improve health behaviors. Peer networks can provide information and community to patients who otherwise might struggle alone with a new or existing disease.

From the Patient Engagement Insights Report: Social Networks to Incent Better Health. Click To Enlarge.

 

Approximately three-fourths of Insights Council member respondents report their organization uses some type of social network as part of their care delivery platforms, but 90% report that these approaches are not yet mature or only slightly mature. However, more than 60% of respondents believe that when social networks do mature, the impact on patient engagement, quality of care, and provider engagement will be major to moderate — a significant endorsement of the potential of social networks in support of patient health.

Why are clinicians and health care leaders interested in tapping into social networks? The most obvious reason is that health systems have begun to take on financial risk for populations of patients. When health systems assume risk, they are no longer focused solely on treating disease and are incented to consider an array of options for keeping people healthy. Social networks provide the opportunity for innovative care at a relatively low cost (respondents score cost investment lowest among challenges to scaling these tools). Insights Council members single out disease-specific patient support groups and caregiver support groups as the social network approaches with the most potential (chosen by 75% and 66% of respondents, respectively).

Patients, physicians, and nurses — voted the top three parties who should be involved in developing social networks — will have to give careful thought how to make best use of these platforms. They will have to consider which tools they should use, whether to build or buy, how to integrate into workflows, and how to engage providers and patients successfully and sustainably. ”

Face-to-face communication (whether through group sessions or trainings) is named as the most useful mode of communication for social networks (by 69% of respondents). However, it seems inevitable that technology developments and an effort to more meaningfully engage younger patients will push virtual connections, such as social media sites, higher on the list. Social media platforms are a potentially more stable channel for connections with and among patients. For example, people switch cell phone numbers more frequently (largely due to cost issues) than they do Facebook user names.

In verbatim comments, some survey respondents express concern about HIPAA and other privacy regulations in the use of social media sites. It must be acknowledged, though, that for many years patients have been tapping into social networks such as Alcoholics Anonymous, without concerns about privacy being a barrier. What has been missing is the formal involvement and endorsement by health systems. Insights Council respondents also say they are worried patients will receive flawed information about their diagnosis and treatment on social networks. Council members also are looking for reimbursement models that justify the time necessary to develop, implement, and measure the impact of social networks.

Patients, physicians, and nurses — voted the top three parties who should be involved in developing social networks — will have to give careful thought how to make best use of these platforms. They will have to consider which tools they should use, whether to build or buy, how to integrate into workflows, and how to engage providers and patients successfully and sustainably. We are in the initial stages of this work and look forward to supporting maturation of social networks to improve outcomes.


VERBATIM COMMENTS FROM SURVEY RESPONDENTS

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Digital Transformation of Healthcare: IoMT Connectivity, AI, and Value Streams

Digital Transformation of Healthcare: IoMT Connectivity, AI, and Value Streams | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

The Digital Transformation (DX) of Healthcare is imminent. A number of key advances in technology as well as digital transformation best practices are paving the way for a watershed year in Healthcare. In addition to the staggering and continuously rising cost of Healthcare, silos within Healthcare value streams as well errors in diagnostics and inconsistencies in patient data are some of the pervasive challenges in the healthcare industry. Consider this. Medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the United States!

These formidable challenges of Healthcare impact our pocketbooks and wellness. However, the Digital Transformation of Healthcare is also becoming a reality with tremendous benefits to patients, providers, and payers. More specifically, three complimentary technologies are now the pillars for Healthcare DX:

1.Internet of Things Connected Wellness and Medical Devices: This year also at CES 2018 there were 200 Digital Health technologies focusing on Wellness and Medical Devices with concrete benefits for the consumer. In addition medical devices are becoming increasingly intelligent, connected, and robust for delivering optimized healthcare services. There is even an acronym for it: Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) that aggregates connectivity of medical devices with Information Technology (IT).

2. Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare: AI for discovering patterns from connected healthcare monitoring devices as well as patient transactions are providing tremendous opportunities for preventive care. There are many different types of AI preventive care models. In addition to aggregating and mining models from patient data another benefit of AI in healthcare is to opt for a system of continuous learning within the system itself. Furthermore, the knowledge harvested from various medical sources including patients, connected devices, and medical staff such as doctors and nurses, can be digitized and automated. The combination or even “champion challenge” between care options mined and discovered from patient data vs. the knowledge of experts (e.g. doctors and nurses) provides increased opportunities in optimizing the patient care.


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How Gaming Could Help ER Doctors Save More Lives

How Gaming Could Help ER Doctors Save More Lives | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
No one masters a skill without mistakes, but when you’re a health care provider, screw ups can be deadly. In 2016, the National Academy of Sciences found that every year up to 30,000 civilian and military deaths of trauma patients could be prevented if the injured people had received optimal care.A new video game developed by a critical care doctor at the University of Pittsburgh aims to help emergency medicine physicians build trauma expertize in a low-stakes environment.
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Denise Silber's curator insight, January 19, 6:19 PM
More than one game or high tech tool out there to teach physicians. Will be interesting to see which ones succeed.
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Can Purdue Pharma Ease the Pain of #Opioid Victims with Apple Watches for Chronic Pain "Therapy"?

Can Purdue Pharma Ease the Pain of #Opioid Victims with Apple Watches for Chronic Pain "Therapy"? | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Purdue Pharma and Geisinger announced today that the first patient has been enrolled in the companies’ upcoming trial of medical wearables as an alternative therapy for chronic pain.

The ResearchKit study looks to see how wearables (in this case, the Apple Watch) can alleviate pain without relying on pharmaceutical painkillers, a commendable goal for a company whose painkilling opioid OxyContin has been at the heart of the US’ ongoing opioid epidemic.

“What we are really looking at is whether we can we decrease pain, improve functioning, and reduce reliance on pain medication,” Dr. Tracy Mayne, Purdue’s head of medical affairs strategic research, told MobiHealthNews in March. “They aren’t all necessarily ... taking opioids, but these are very sick patients with chronic pain and a lot of comorbidities, and I would be very surprised if even some of them haven’t been on pain medication for a long time.”

In the non-randomized prospective trial, 240 adult multidisciplinary pain-program patients receiving treatment within the Geisinger healthcare system will receive an Apple Watch to measure physical activity, self-reported pain, heart rate, medication use, and other relevant variables over 12 months. The watches will be outfitted with a specialized pain app and healthcare provider dashboard that not only integrates with Geisinger’s EMR, but suggests alternative pain treatment strategies such as stretching, mindfulness, and thermotherapy.

“The goal of this technology is to improve patient function and quality of life while reducing the need for analgesic medications. It provides objective measures of numerous aspects of pain, function, and treatment effectiveness so that information can be gathered for the patient and the healthcare provider in between visits,” Dr. Tracy Mayne, head of medical affairs strategic research for Purdue Pharma, said in a statement. “We are pleased to partner with Geisinger on this important initiative and believe real-time data may have the potential to support an improved understanding of chronic pain patients’ experiences and needs.”


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Pharma Guy's curator insight, October 6, 2017 7:55 AM

I can't believe this crock of shite!

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How pharma and patient advocacy groups can become in sync

How pharma and patient advocacy groups can become in sync | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

At next month’s Patient Summit Europe (19-20 October, London) find out how you can be more than a trusted partner – get yourself on the same side as your patients, and deliver sophisticated advocacy that fights their cause.

Patient advocacy groups and pharma companies have the same ultimate goal – better health outcomes – but managing these relationships needs care on both sides.

To give you an insight into the level of discussion you can expect at the summit, we spoke with:
- Nisith Kumar, Director, Global Patient Affairs, Pfizer
- Ann Kwong, Founder and CEO, TREK Therapeutics
- Lynn Bartnicki, Patient advocate, Living Beyond Breast Cancer

Read the article ‘Dancing to the same tune?’ here: https://goo.gl/hgVVms
Kind regards,
Cintia Hernandez Marco


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rob halkes's curator insight, September 13, 2017 8:27 AM

“Some drug companies are really focused on patients, and some don’t have a clue.” Lynn Bartnicki, patient advocate

- a quote from the report of Eyeforpharma.

Good to see some words from pharma and patient advocates published.

Even better to follow and read one of the many publications about the pharma and patient groups' relations: a trying but difficult engagement

You can look at the patient perspective in "pharma corporate reputations",

or overviews of the patient movement. A study about pharma and the connected patient. And above all: check your own credibility as a pharma company in the eyes of patients: your bespoke data on your company, for its different affiliations and therapy areas, based on 6 years of global data on corporate reputation in the perspective of patients and patient groups.

rob halkes's curator insight, September 13, 2017 8:41 AM

“Some drug companies are really focused on patients, and some don’t have a clue.” Lynn Bartnicki, patient advocate

- a quote from the report of Eyeforpharma.

Good to see some words from pharma and patient advocates published.

Even better to follow and read one of the many publications about the pharma and patient groups' relations: a trying but difficult engagement

You can look at the patient perspective in "pharma corporate reputations", or at overviews of the patient movement. 

A study about pharma and the connected patient. And above all: check your own credibility as a pharma company in the eyes of patients: your bespoke data on your company, for its different affiliations and therapy areas, based on 6 years of global data on corporate reputation in the perspective of patients and patient groups.

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Healthcare Professionals’ Social Networks The Beginning of the End of Pharma Marketing as We Know it?

Healthcare Professionals’ Social Networks The Beginning of the End of Pharma Marketing as We Know it? Len Starnes Head of Digital Marketing & Sales General Med…


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How Cleveland Clinic connects with patients via social media

How Cleveland Clinic connects with patients via social media | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
The Cleveland Clinic also has a substantial base on social media and has been on Facebook since 2008 and now has about two million Facebook followers.

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Social Media And Ethical Concerns For Healthcare Professionals

Social Media And Ethical Concerns For Healthcare Professionals | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
While social media use in healthcare has the potential to bring value to patient-provider relationships, it is not without its ethical and professional challenges. This presentation looks at those challenges and suggests ways to deal with them.

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Art Jones's curator insight, August 29, 2017 11:53 AM

Risk vs. Reward

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Twitter Moments: How Healthcare Organizations can Improve Marketing ROI in 2017

Twitter Moments: How Healthcare Organizations can Improve Marketing ROI in 2017 | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Last year, Twitter opened its storytelling feature called “Twitter Moments” to the public to encourage the sharing of stories and news globally. With this capability, brands as well as individuals can share and create their own stories, using tweets and multimedia that have been uploaded onto the channel. By prioritizing short, succinct, digestible pieces of content, Twitter is attempting to compete with other digital storytelling giantssuch as Snapchat and Instagram. Twitter, reporting 317 million monthly users, is pushing digital boundaries in hopes of staying ahead of the competitive curve. For healthcare organizations, this feature has the potential to dramatically improve marketing ROI: “Twitter Moments just leverages what Twitter is already about, which is real-time marketing,” notes Rebecca Lieb, a digital media and marketing analyst quoted in a recent AdWeek article.

All digital channels are now recognizing the importance of succinct storytelling, whether it’s a healthcare CEO sharing inspiration for their company’s future via a LinkedIn post, or a hospital taking a video of their new pediatric wing on Facebook, it’s all aimed at one thing: providing audiences with content that they want, when they want it and how they want it. With the 24/7 news cycle and instantaneous social media world we live in, it’s sink or swim in this brave new digital world. How did Twitter announce the details of its new feature? By publishing their own Twitter moment of course.  

Below are a few ways Twitter Moments can help healthcare organizations improve their marketing ROI in 2017:

Showcase the value of your brand. For example, a healthcare client of SPR’s crafted a moment in order to highlight the value of physician assistants, including tweets with statistics around the growth of the profession over the last five years. Not only is this a great way to tell a story, but it emphasizes a mutual sharing of information and visuals around a topic.Engage with your brand advocates and followers. A best practice in social media marketing today is to share your follower’s content and with Twitter Moments, you can do just that. By sharing your audience’s content/tweets, your healthcare organization will build a deeper level of trust, signaling to your audience that the organization is paying attention and listening to what’s being said about the brand/topic/issue.Shape your healthcare brand’s reputation and messaging. Where anyone can leave a comment anywhere, at any time, brands are monitoring constantly to make sure they stay on their central messaging points as well as maintain their reputation because it doesn’t take much on social media to sully a brand’s reputation. With Twitter Moments, a healthcare organization can put out a particular perspective on a topic/story and control the messaging around it, sharing only the information that they want to.

According to a recent AdWeek article, even Twitter’s competitor YouTube eagerly jumped on board to use the Moments feature. By crafting a Twitter Moment to promote its custom series, YouTube Red Originals, engagement rates doubled compared to the engagement rates it achieved for its promoted Twitter trendwhich cost the company more than $100,000. Using the same content, Twitter Moments is the less expensive of the two options that ends up producing better results.

Twitter Moments are not solely for individuals and brands, however – media outlets are publishing Twitter Moments to curate and share news in real time. For example, executive editor at Newsweek Margarita Noriega produced a Twitter Moment detailing what happens when President-elect Trump attacks journalists online. She points out that it’s an opportunity to share information in real-time, noting that many fellow outlets are missing out on a huge opportunity to engage with their audiences on trending topics and news.  

For healthcare organizations today attempting to stay on top of their digital game, it’s crucial that they consider using Twitter Moments to tell their brand’s story in order to engage with key stakeholders and followers.


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MIT & GlaxoSmithKline launch flu tracking app Flumoji

MIT & GlaxoSmithKline launch flu tracking app Flumoji | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline and MIT Connection Science have launched a new flu app called Flumoji to help users track symptoms & share that information with researchers working to improve disease surveillance.

Cases of the flu have increased nationally as the season begins to hit its usual peak. Tracking the activity of such an ubiqutious disease can help public health officials guide limited resources to the areas where they could get the most bang for their buck.

We’ve seen interesting uses of digital health for flu tracking in recent years, ranging from medical apps to guide flu treatment to the use of social media and internet searches to track activity. Flumoji is an Android app that includes educational material about the flu as well as symptom tracking features, which includes collection of data already being captured by the phone:

…the Flumoji app tracks a variety of real-time data from a user’s phone in order to detect fluctuations in a user’s activity levels, social levels, and general routine. These fluctuations are used to predict whether a user is experiencing a flu-like outbreak. Real-time data is only collected during the flu season.

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The Benefits of Twitter for Scientists » American Scientist

The Benefits of Twitter for Scientists » American Scientist | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
The Benefits of Twitter for Scientists
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Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, January 19, 2017 11:52 AM
usage of twitter is indeed growing to circulate information, and why not teach and learn
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The Digital Patient Journey

The Digital Patient Journey | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
KEY TAKEAWAY: We can’t assume that being an empowered patient is a positive experience. Many patients enter a maze of online health information, coupled with managing appointments with multip…

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Twitter shows side effects patients don't tell doctors | Daily

Twitter shows side effects patients don't tell doctors | Daily | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Scanning Twitter may help doctors learn more about the drugs they're prescribing. 

According to new research, they are more likely to find out about side effects patients are complaining about by looking online rather than what they say in a doctor's office.

A study looked at more than 20,000 Twitter posts to see what side effects people said they experienced with prednisolone, a commonly used steroid for allergies, blood disorders and even rheumatoid arthritis.

The research team used a computer system to identify tweets containing the drug name and any mention of a likely drug side-effect. For instance, it converted phrases like 'can't sleep', into more medical terms, like 'insomnia'.

 

Over the course of three years, they harvested 159,297 tweets mentioning prednisolon. 

 
+2
 

Lead author for the study, Professor Dixon, said: 'Less serious side-effects are often missed in other research because patients may not mention their symptoms to their doctors, or they are not recorded in medical records. Yet this is despite them being troublesome,'

Straight-talking online 

Around 20,000 of the tweets also mentioned a suspected side-effect. 

Of the tweets analysed, 1,737 mentioned insomnia, 1,656 mentioned weight gain, 1,576 mentioned non-specific reactions such as 'I hate Prednisolone', and 1,515 reported increased appetite. The research was published in the journal Digital Medicine, today.  

 
 

Even though they found patients most often expressed concerns over insomnia and weight gain, these are rarely brought up in conversations with physicians.

Both of these are well-known side effects of prednisolone, but the research tends to focus on more serious side-effects, like osteoporosis and fractures.

Share your symptoms 

The lead author for the study, Professor Dixon, added: 'Our view is that social media sources such as Twitter can be useful because they can illustrate which drug side-effects patients discuss most commonly, even if they are not necessarily the most serious.

 
+2
 

Even though they found patients most often expressed concerns over insomnia and weight gain, these are rarely brought up in conversations with physicians

CAN THE COST OF DRUGS ALTER THE SIDE EFFECTS?

People experience both the good and bad effects of a drug more intensely when they think it's expensive, a study showed in October.

Research published in Science demonstrated that the perceived cost of a drug can amplify the 'nocebo effect' which is the experience of side effects from a medication with no actual therapeutic effects.

German researchers at University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf applied a cream to the arms of their subjects and told them that one of the possible side effects was pain in the area.

The subjects that were given the ‘expensive’ cream not only reported higher pain levels, but scans of their brains showed greater activity in areas associated with the experience of pain.

 

'Less serious side-effects are often missed in other research because patients may not mention their symptoms to their doctors, or they are not recorded in medical records. Yet this is despite them being troublesome.

'This form of research is clearly just one piece of the jigsaw, but it nevertheless is an important one.

'In this example, it helps re-focus our research into steroid-related side effects that are clearly important to patients.

'Social media posts may also give us a future view of how side-effects impact on patients' quality of life.'

 

Dr Rikesh Patel, a member of the research team, says he believes using computer scanning as they have done is the future of getting more information on the side effects of drugs. 

'We believe social media such as Twitter can be used to broaden knowledge about drugs and potential side-effects that patients themselves find troublesome.

'And this type of automatic extraction is an efficient way of getting this information, because we're dealing with large volumes of data.   

 


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In just two hours, Amazon erased $30 billion in market value for healthcare’s biggest companies

In just two hours, Amazon erased $30 billion in market value for healthcare’s biggest companies | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Amazon has disrupted fashion, books, furniture, food, cloud-based storage services, and much else besides. Now, it's coming for one of the biggest, most complex industries in the US: healthcare. Today (Jan. 30), Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan announced a vague but market-moving plan to launch an independent company that will offer healthcare services t

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Art Jones's curator insight, January 31, 12:13 PM

Amazon is a dominate force in every consumer facing industry. The next industry Amazon's looking to disrupt is Healthcare.

 

Excerpt:

Amazon has disrupted fashion, books, furniture, food, cloud-based storage services, and much else besides. Now, it’s coming for one of the biggest, most complex industries in the US: healthcare.

 

Today (Jan. 30), Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan announced a vague but market-moving plan to launch an independent company that will offer healthcare services to the companies’ employees at a lower cost. The venture, which will be managed by executives from the firms, will be run more like a non-profit, than a for-profit entity.

 

The market value of 10 large, listed health insurance and pharmacy stocks 1 dropped by a combined $30 billion in the first two hours of trading. At the time of writing, insurer MetLife was the hardest hit, down nearly 9% for the day.

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Integrating digital biomarkers into precision medicine

Integrating digital biomarkers into precision medicine | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Digital biomarkers provide access to new types of insights and offer unique advantages by allowing data to be generated frequently and as part of the patient’s daily life. Moreover, these low-cost, high-efficiency tools can be integrated into existing biomarker strategies. With an increase in well-validated digital health tools and continued investment in this technology, we can expect to see digital biomarkers play a major role in diagnosis and health outcomes.

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Social Media Trends That Will Transform the Healthcare Industry in 2018

Social Media Trends That Will Transform the Healthcare Industry in 2018 | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

The world of social media marketing has changed significantly over the past decade or so. These changes are driven by trends in patient behavior and preferences, mainly by Gen Z and millennials. Reaching out to the younger members of society means that healthcare marketers need to change their communication models and focus on what matters to the younger generation.

Regardless of the size and specialty of your medical practice, social media is your best bet for reaching out to your target audience. Social networks have a captive and thriving audience and provide endless opportunities for healthcare marketers to build meaningful relationships with their target audience. An average American user has five social media accounts and each day spends more than two hours browsing them. According to studies, social media activities account for nearly 30 percent of all online interactions. This is why it is vital to stay on top of social media trends.

Here are the top eight social media trends that are likely to have a significant impact on the healthcare market in 2018.

1. Video Content Will Surge Ahead

Video content has grown exponentially in popularity over the last few years and will continue to grow in 2018, as well. The predictions vary. Cisco predicts 80 percent of online traffic will be driven by video content by 2019, whereas Mark Zuckerberg expects 90 percent of Facebook’s content to be video-based by 2018. Nearly 80 percent of social media users said they would rather watch a video than read plain text. In addition, the Facebook live video gets three times more views.

Mobile video is highly likely to be the primary way your patients will prefer to consume healthcare content. Healthcare marketers should also consider that mobile has taken over as the fundamental way to access social media. This is because video content elicits higher engagement rates. New formats such as live streaming are an effective way to engage target customers.


In 2018, you may see a steady rise in high-quality video content. According to HootSuite, online visitors are spending more time looking at video content than reading plain text. In fact, social video advertising grew more than 130 percent in 2017. An excellent way to utilize video is by creating and sharing short clips based on the demands and preferences of your target audience.

Overall, having the ability to create relevant video content in multiple formats on a regular basis and strategically tying it to your blogs and eBooks will be critical in 2018. Medical marketers will need to work out how they can leverage a variety of video formats as part of their content marketing strategies. Marketers will need to ensure they are creating content that reflects their business goals and objectives.

2. Increased Emphasis on User-Generated Content

According to marketing surveys, nearly 66 percent of new patients trust online reviews posted by other patients, and an even higher percentage of potential patients believe recommendations from their family and friends. Social networks are presenting many exciting opportunities to use user-generated content into building healthy relationships with prospective and existing patients.

Medical practices can leverage user-generated content on their social media profiles to engage their followers. For instance, you can ask your followers to submit reviews or share experiences of your practice on social networks. You can then choose the best submissions and share them on your page, giving credit to the followers who submitted them. This is not just a great way to get fresh content regularly; it is also a proven strategy for engaging your potential and existing patients. Chosen followers will be motivated and will be more likely to recommend your services to their family and friends. Instagram is said to deliver the biggest ROI for user-generated content.

In 2018, you can expect to see more healthcare facilities integrating user-generated content into their social media campaigns. Healthcare marketers must look forward to 2018 and start leveraging this trend if they wish to remain competitive.


3. Chatbots and Messaging Apps Will Improve Patient Service

Patient experience is valuable. Patient experience is what it sounds like – making sure your patients have a good experience at your practice and with your employees. The concept of delivering superior patient experience is steadily gaining momentum. More than 68 percent of marketers say they are focusing on improving customer experience.


Chatbots can give medical practices the chance to interact quickly with their target audience in a way that feels personal. There are at least 100,000 active bots on Facebook Messenger every month, and almost 2 billion messages are exchanged between businesses and their target audiences each month. In 2018, medical practices will have to step out of their comfort zones and focus on chatbots and messaging apps in order to deliver excellent patient service. Healthcare marketers will invest more time and effort in interaction with patients via messaging apps and chatbots. A combination of chatbots and messaging apps can significantly enhance the quality of patient service.

4. Influencer Marketing Will Continue to Rise

Social media influencers have an incredible reach, usually with followings in thousands or millions. Healthcare marketers are shifting toward paying these influencers to promote their products and services. Nearly 32 percent of US-based influencers say Facebook is the best social networking platform, while 24 percent of influencers think Instagram is the best.

Influencer marketing is believed to deliver 11 times the ROI compared to traditional marketing strategies, and more than 49 percent of new patients depend on influencers for choosing their next medical facility. This is not a passing trend, but a multibillion dollar industry. A lot of these social media influencers walk away with six-figure incomes, just by promoting brands to their followers.

More than 90 percent of healthcare marketers who employ an influencer marketing strategy to connect with new patients and improve engagement with existing patients believe it is successful. In 2018, more healthcare facilities will embrace influencer marketing as a way to communicate with their target audiences.

5. Instagram Stories Will Be More Popular

With Instagram Stories, you can publish content that lives for 24 hours before disappearing. This is believed to be the perfect way to keep your followers engaged without over-sharing content to your Instagram profile. In addition, you can hashtag relevant keywords to help target users find your posts quickly and easily.

Instagram Stories is perhaps the most significant change in the Instagram user interface, and the marketing opportunities that it provides are tremendous. Instagram Stories is also more lucrative from a marketing perspective because, unlike other social media platforms, Instagram metrics are trackable. This means healthcare marketers trying to connect with their target audience on Instagram must take the time to get on board with Instagram Stories.

Daily viewers of Instagram Stories have surpassed daily SnapChat viewers within one year after launch, and the growth is not expected to slow down in 2018. It is likely that more than 50 percent of all Instagram users will be using Instagram Stories by the end of 2018.

6. Organic Reach Strategies Are Likely to Decline

With an increasing number of businesses strengthening their presence on social networks, there was a need to invent measures to combat spam. This means marketers have to face a dramatic decline in organic reach. Due to less organic return, marketers have to be more selective about what and where to post.

Healthcare marketers need to stop relying on short-term tactics that once worked. Facebook has already announced that organic reach will soon be zero. 2018 is likely to be the year when we will feel the pinch on the organic reach of our social media content. While you must be creating and sharing the most genuine and relevant content, you need to understand that it is a pay-to-play world. With a lot of businesses increasingly disappearing from newsfeeds, ephemeral content is key to staying top-of-mind in 2018.

Instead, healthcare marketers need to start building sustainable social media strategies. This means carefully choosing networks where you post content and investing more in paid ads and influencer strategies.

7. Ephemeral Content Will Rule Patient Engagement

Ephemeral content is short-lived content that appears for just 24 hours and then disappears on its own. This type of content is gaining immense popularity among millennials and generation Z. Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook stories have led to the demand for ephemeral content. Because of the nature of content, the information is lost within hours, thus making your followers take fast action.

Ephemeral content is a great way to preview upcoming projects and showcase behind-the-scene content that is supposed to be short-lived. However, you will need an effective strategy in 2018 to engage your target audiences in the shortest possible time.

Your target audience will consider short-lived content more authentic, and it may motivate them to call your office and schedule an appointment.

8. Live Streaming Will Expand

The live-streaming market is growing at an alarming rate. While live streaming has been around for a while now, the way patients and healthcare brands are going to use them is likely to evolve. We are going to see a lot more of live streaming in 2018, and the brands that leverage it well will be rejoicing in the organic reach it will generate.

Live streaming was a $30 billion industry in 2016, and it is expected to more than double in size by 2021 to become a $70 billion industry. One of the biggest reasons you should care about live streaming is due to its massive user base and rising popularity. Live streaming is a nearly free way to drive lots of traffic to your social media profile and tons of revenue for your medical practice.

In 2018, more healthcare brands will harness the power of live streaming and will incorporate it into their healthcare content marketing strategy. Just like Facebook and Instagram, other social networks too will try to capitalize on the trend.

Wrapping Up

The role of social media marketing is expanding, and we expect a lot of changes in the social media landscape in 2018. One thing is sure: Social networks will offer brands more ways to create engaging content and more natural ways to share it. Most likely, video streaming and ephemeral content will go mainstream. Additionally, healthcare brands may turn to newer social platforms as Gen Z will spend a lot of their time there. This means healthcare marketers will need to strengthen their online presence in 2016. However, it is essential to stay informed on the behavior and preferences of your target audience.

It is critical to look forward to 2018 and adjust to the healthcare social media trends if you wish to remain competitive in the market.
If these trends have inspired you to begin transforming your medical practice’s social media marketing campaign, Practice Builders can help you. Not only do we have the experience and insight to point you in the right direction, but we also have the technology to make you achieve your business goals. For more information, contact us today.


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Is Pharma "Gamification" Up to Snuff?

Is Pharma "Gamification" Up to Snuff? | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Gamification can be found everywhere—from boardrooms to classrooms, and even on social media. The practice has gained widespread recognition over the last few years through its incorporation into marketing, healthcare, business, politics, and technology design. Subsequently, pharma is embracing the recent trend in healthcare gamification, and utilising this technology to engage both healthcare providers (HCPs) and payers (including patients).

 

Research and case studies provide evidence that healthcare gamification improves both patient compliance and health outcomes. Using gamification as part of a marketing strategy can help companies deliver their message to a wider audience and boost marketing efforts in several ways.

 

Gamification can promote therapies.Gamification can increase engagement between pharma, HCPs, and patients.Gamification can facilitate physician education.

 

Interactive creativity, coupled with proactive health information endorsement, can help build the reputation of brand, increase customer engagement, and improve consumer loyalty. Although gamification within pharma marketing is still in its early stages, with several challenges to successful implementation, the potential benefits are wide-reaching. Indeed, the effective use of gamification could take pharmaceutical marketing to entirely new heights.

 

Further Reading:

“Can Gamification Increase #Pharma Drug Brand Awareness?”; http://sco.lt/5EUjBp“Mission T1D - Sanofi Diabetes is on a Mission to Support Children with Type 1 Diabetes through Gaming”; http://sco.lt/5bRCNt“Is Pharma Gamification Dead in the Water?”; http://sco.lt/7simav“Gamification at Peak of Inflated Expectations & Near Trough of Disillusionment"; http://sco.lt/7Sya93“Pharma Games Must Be Careful Not to Incentivize Patients to Lie for Rewards”; http://sco.lt/4nX5H7
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, September 21, 2017 12:09 PM

The author claims that "gamification" improves patient compliance and health outcomes and that it can help pharma marketers deliver their message. Unfortunately, little evidence of this is provided. 

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Why Amazon invested in this cancer-testing startup founded by a Google exec

Why Amazon invested in this cancer-testing startup founded by a Google exec | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

A health start-up called Grail is developing one of the most ambitious technologies in Silicon Valley.

And Amazon wants a piece of it.

According to two sources familiar, Amazon invested in Grail as a very special kind of future customer for its cloud business.

 

Grail is hoping that its can use deep sequencing technology to detect the earliest signs of cancer in the blood, while it's still treatable. That requires a huge amount of data processing and storage.

That's potentially a huge business for Amazon Web Services.

Reuters reported that the market to store human genetic data is expected to be worth $1 billion by 2018. By 2025, an anticipated 100 million and 2 billion human genomics could be sequenced, according to a 2015 report. Biologists have long-anticipated that the computing resources to handle all that data would outweigh Twitter and YouTube.

Grail's test will not be commercialized in the U.S. for years -- it is aiming for 2019 -- but it will be dabbling in huge data-sets well before then.

It needs to run large-scale clinical studies to demonstrate to industry stakeholders that its technology is both sensitive and accurate. Hundreds of thousands of people will need to be sequenced for each of these studies. And the genomes will need to be securely stored somewhere.

Amazon's investment, initially reported earlier this year, was a little surprising. The e-commerce and cloud services leader doesn't typically bet on start-ups in the regulated life sciences sector. Moreover, Grail CEO Jeff Huber, was a long-time executive at Google, an Amazon rival. (Google also invested in an earlier fund-raising round for Grail through GV, its venture arm, now a division of Google holding company Alphabet.)

But these companies are "positioning themselves for something they think will be big," said Zamin Iqbal, who leads a computational genomics research group at the European Bioinformatics Institute.

Iqbal doesn't expect revenues to be significant yet, in part due to privacy concerns and lack of uptick for whole genome analysis from health providers.

But that could all change in the coming years. "The future of genomics is likely to involve the cloud heavily," he continued.

Another factor that drew Amazon into the deal was Grail's presence in Asia, the people said. In March, the company merged with a blood diagnostics company in China. Amazon Web Services has announced it plans to open a new data center "region" in Hong Kong in 2018.

 


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Denise Silber's curator insight, August 28, 2017 5:34 AM
Detecting cancer and other diseases in blood, other body fluids, such as sweat, and tomorrow in microbiome patterns, is the new holy grail.
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Social Media for Medical Technology Companies

Companies can leverage social media to drive business and compete effectively in the new era of health care. But what do you need to know before jumping in or …

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How Wearable Technology is Transforming Healthcare? #Infographic

How Wearable Technology is Transforming Healthcare? #Infographic | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Health care providers are using wearable technology to enhance the clinical outcomes of sufferers of chronic diseases and improve clinician/patient engagement processes.
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10 ways healthcare companies are testing Instagram

10 ways healthcare companies are testing Instagram | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

1. Medtronic (Corporate)

The medical device company, which develops insulin pumps for diabetes patients, has more than 16,000 followers. Wendy Blackburn, EVP of Intouch Solutions, said Instagram makes sense for diabetes marketing, since it has always been a disease category that is active on social media and tends to have a broad age range of patients.





2. Team Novo Nordisk (Corporate) 

“Racing to inspire, educate and empower everyone affected by diabetes” is the tagline of Novo Nordisk's diabetes pro cycling team. This account has more than 73,000 followers and close to 2,000 posts.




3. #BreatheBoldly(Campaign)

In honor of the late Leonard Nimoy, who famously played Mr. Spock from “Star Trek,” Philips Healthcare and the COPD Foundation launched the #BreatheBoldly campaign to raise awareness of COPD in November. Celebrities such as actress Whoopi Goldberg, actor Vince Vaughn, and reality TV star Melissa Gorga posted videos on their Facebook and Instagram pages to show the challenges of suffering from the condition.





4. Flonase (Brand)

Facebook Health industry manager Danielle Salowski points to GlaxoSmithKline's over-the-counter allergy treatment Flonase as a good example of Instagram used well, showcasing vibrant seasonal imagery with related comments and information about how allergies affect people in the winter, spring, fall, and summer.





5. Pfizer (Corporate)

Blackburn doesn't recommend deleting comments, even when they are negative. She noted that Pfizer has a lot of trolls on its Instagram page, but doesn't delete them. “There will always be trolls and haters,” she said. “Deleting sends the wrong message because you're on there to engage to begin with.”

See also: How can drugmakers tell better stories? Try Instagram





6. Bayer4Animals (Corporate) 

According to a study by BarkBox, dog owners in the U.S. on average post one photo or talk about their dog on social media six times a week. Bayer Animal Health targets pet owners and animal lovers with engaging animal photos and information about keeping them healthy.





7. Tylenol (Brand)

Like Flonase, Johnson & Johnson's Tylenol ties different moments throughout their year with content that tells a story through that lens, noted Salowski. “What I like about that is people know what to expect when they see content from Tylenol,” she said. “That's how they're connecting and engaging, and they just do a beautiful job with their photography and taking advantage of the mobile format.”




8. Emily Maynard for Diclegis (Influencer)

In June, The Bachelor and The Bachelorette's Emily Maynard Johnson made a post about her experience taking Duchesnay USA's morning sickness pill Diclegis — including safety information. It is the drugmakers second attempt at leveraging a celebrity spokesperson's Instagram handle — following a less successful example with Kim Kardashian West in July 2015 — to reach its target audience of expectant mothers.





9. Novartis (Corporate)


Novartis' corporate Instagram page comprises a mix of images and videos showing their corporate history and milestones, social and humanitarian efforts, and the drugmaker's attention to education and training.





10. Sanofi (Corporate)

There are drugmakers like Sanofi that have created an Instagram handle but not yet activated it with posts.


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25,000 data points per day: Wearable sensors can alert you when you are getting sick

25,000 data points per day: Wearable sensors can alert you when you are getting sick | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

A new wave of portable biosensors allows frequent measurement of health-related physiology. A group at Stanford investigated the use of these devices to monitor human physiological changes during various activities and their role in managing health and diagnosing and analyzing disease. By recording over 250,000 daily measurements for up to 43 individuals, they found personalized circadian differences in physiological parameters, replicating previous physiological findings. Interestingly, the research group also found striking changes in particular environments, such as airline flights (decreased peripheral capillary oxygen saturation [SpO2] and increased radiation exposure). These events are associated with physiological macro-phenotypes such as fatigue, providing a strong association between reduced pressure/oxygen and fatigue on high-altitude flights.

 

Importantly, when they combined biosensor information with frequent medical measurements, they made two important observations: First, wearable devices were useful in identification of early signs of Lyme disease and inflammatory responses; the research team used this information to develop a personalized, activity-based normalization framework to identify abnormal physiological signals from longitudinal data for facile disease detection. Second, wearables distinguish physiological differences between insulin-sensitive and -resistant individuals.

 

Overall, these results indicate that portable biosensors provide useful information for monitoring personal activities and physiology and are likely to play an important role in managing health and enabling affordable health care access to groups traditionally limited by socioeconomic class or remote geography.


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GSK and MIT Team Up to Test Flumoji - an Android App That May Provide RWE in Clinical Trials

GSK and MIT Team Up to Test Flumoji - an Android App That May Provide RWE in Clinical Trials | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Flumoji is your health wizard. Tell it how you feel and it will magically learn how to help protect you from Flu and other ailments.


This MIT study is designed to help increase awareness of the spread of flu and flu-like symptoms and educate you on how to reduce the risk of -- and help prevent -- flu infection. Your data along with other users of the app could potentially improve overall health outcomes in the general population.

 

Flumoji is being tested by MIT and GSK to see if it can speed up identification of flu outbreaks.

 

“Real-time tracking of seasonal flu outbreaks is key,” says GSK on Facebook. “However, researchers have yet to find a tracking mechanism that’s fast and reliable enough to support testing of potential #flu treatments in clinical trials.”


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rob halkes's curator insight, January 12, 2017 9:15 AM

RWE (real world evidence) and RWD (-data) bear the promise that we find context conditions and personal factores needed for #precisionmedicine ! It takes more to "tango" however, so it is good to see how initial collaborations begin to find ground!