Healthcare and pharma in social media
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Apple’s Pact with 13 Health Care Systems Might Actually Disrupt the Industry

Apple’s Pact with 13 Health Care Systems Might Actually Disrupt the Industry | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
It could let health care data be used in innovative ways.
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Patient Engagement Survey: Social Networks to Improve Patient Health

Patient Engagement Survey: Social Networks to Improve Patient Health | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

In our most recent NEJM Catalyst Insights Council Patient Engagement Survey, “Social Networks to Improve Patient Health,” 99% of respondents acknowledge that social networks are potentially useful in health care delivery, especially for chronic disease management (named by 85% of respondents) and promotion of healthy behaviors such as weight loss, physical activity, and healthy eating (78%).

The NEJM Catalyst Insights Council members surveyed — composed of health care executives, clinical leaders, and clinicians — see significant opportunity to improve health by either building or leveraging existing social networks. The seminal research by the medical sociologist Nicholas Christakis shows the strong linkage of behaviors leading to obesity, smoking, and alcohol use within social networks.

Approximately three-fourths of Insights Council member respondents report their organization uses some type of social network as part of their care delivery initiatives, but 90% say these are not yet mature or only slightly mature.”

Facebook and other social media sites illustrate in everyday life the power of social connectedness and the influences individuals have on one another’s behavior. Historically, care delivery has focused exclusively on individual patients. Awareness is growing that social networks in health care, such as PatientsLikeMe and Connected Living, can help people improve health behaviors. Peer networks can provide information and community to patients who otherwise might struggle alone with a new or existing disease.

From the Patient Engagement Insights Report: Social Networks to Incent Better Health. Click To Enlarge.

 

Approximately three-fourths of Insights Council member respondents report their organization uses some type of social network as part of their care delivery platforms, but 90% report that these approaches are not yet mature or only slightly mature. However, more than 60% of respondents believe that when social networks do mature, the impact on patient engagement, quality of care, and provider engagement will be major to moderate — a significant endorsement of the potential of social networks in support of patient health.

Why are clinicians and health care leaders interested in tapping into social networks? The most obvious reason is that health systems have begun to take on financial risk for populations of patients. When health systems assume risk, they are no longer focused solely on treating disease and are incented to consider an array of options for keeping people healthy. Social networks provide the opportunity for innovative care at a relatively low cost (respondents score cost investment lowest among challenges to scaling these tools). Insights Council members single out disease-specific patient support groups and caregiver support groups as the social network approaches with the most potential (chosen by 75% and 66% of respondents, respectively).

Patients, physicians, and nurses — voted the top three parties who should be involved in developing social networks — will have to give careful thought how to make best use of these platforms. They will have to consider which tools they should use, whether to build or buy, how to integrate into workflows, and how to engage providers and patients successfully and sustainably. ”

Face-to-face communication (whether through group sessions or trainings) is named as the most useful mode of communication for social networks (by 69% of respondents). However, it seems inevitable that technology developments and an effort to more meaningfully engage younger patients will push virtual connections, such as social media sites, higher on the list. Social media platforms are a potentially more stable channel for connections with and among patients. For example, people switch cell phone numbers more frequently (largely due to cost issues) than they do Facebook user names.

In verbatim comments, some survey respondents express concern about HIPAA and other privacy regulations in the use of social media sites. It must be acknowledged, though, that for many years patients have been tapping into social networks such as Alcoholics Anonymous, without concerns about privacy being a barrier. What has been missing is the formal involvement and endorsement by health systems. Insights Council respondents also say they are worried patients will receive flawed information about their diagnosis and treatment on social networks. Council members also are looking for reimbursement models that justify the time necessary to develop, implement, and measure the impact of social networks.

Patients, physicians, and nurses — voted the top three parties who should be involved in developing social networks — will have to give careful thought how to make best use of these platforms. They will have to consider which tools they should use, whether to build or buy, how to integrate into workflows, and how to engage providers and patients successfully and sustainably. We are in the initial stages of this work and look forward to supporting maturation of social networks to improve outcomes.


VERBATIM COMMENTS FROM SURVEY RESPONDENTS

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Social Media Trends That Will Transform the Healthcare Industry in 2018

Social Media Trends That Will Transform the Healthcare Industry in 2018 | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

The world of social media marketing has changed significantly over the past decade or so. These changes are driven by trends in patient behavior and preferences, mainly by Gen Z and millennials. Reaching out to the younger members of society means that healthcare marketers need to change their communication models and focus on what matters to the younger generation.

Regardless of the size and specialty of your medical practice, social media is your best bet for reaching out to your target audience. Social networks have a captive and thriving audience and provide endless opportunities for healthcare marketers to build meaningful relationships with their target audience. An average American user has five social media accounts and each day spends more than two hours browsing them. According to studies, social media activities account for nearly 30 percent of all online interactions. This is why it is vital to stay on top of social media trends.

Here are the top eight social media trends that are likely to have a significant impact on the healthcare market in 2018.

1. Video Content Will Surge Ahead

Video content has grown exponentially in popularity over the last few years and will continue to grow in 2018, as well. The predictions vary. Cisco predicts 80 percent of online traffic will be driven by video content by 2019, whereas Mark Zuckerberg expects 90 percent of Facebook’s content to be video-based by 2018. Nearly 80 percent of social media users said they would rather watch a video than read plain text. In addition, the Facebook live video gets three times more views.

Mobile video is highly likely to be the primary way your patients will prefer to consume healthcare content. Healthcare marketers should also consider that mobile has taken over as the fundamental way to access social media. This is because video content elicits higher engagement rates. New formats such as live streaming are an effective way to engage target customers.


In 2018, you may see a steady rise in high-quality video content. According to HootSuite, online visitors are spending more time looking at video content than reading plain text. In fact, social video advertising grew more than 130 percent in 2017. An excellent way to utilize video is by creating and sharing short clips based on the demands and preferences of your target audience.

Overall, having the ability to create relevant video content in multiple formats on a regular basis and strategically tying it to your blogs and eBooks will be critical in 2018. Medical marketers will need to work out how they can leverage a variety of video formats as part of their content marketing strategies. Marketers will need to ensure they are creating content that reflects their business goals and objectives.

2. Increased Emphasis on User-Generated Content

According to marketing surveys, nearly 66 percent of new patients trust online reviews posted by other patients, and an even higher percentage of potential patients believe recommendations from their family and friends. Social networks are presenting many exciting opportunities to use user-generated content into building healthy relationships with prospective and existing patients.

Medical practices can leverage user-generated content on their social media profiles to engage their followers. For instance, you can ask your followers to submit reviews or share experiences of your practice on social networks. You can then choose the best submissions and share them on your page, giving credit to the followers who submitted them. This is not just a great way to get fresh content regularly; it is also a proven strategy for engaging your potential and existing patients. Chosen followers will be motivated and will be more likely to recommend your services to their family and friends. Instagram is said to deliver the biggest ROI for user-generated content.

In 2018, you can expect to see more healthcare facilities integrating user-generated content into their social media campaigns. Healthcare marketers must look forward to 2018 and start leveraging this trend if they wish to remain competitive.


3. Chatbots and Messaging Apps Will Improve Patient Service

Patient experience is valuable. Patient experience is what it sounds like – making sure your patients have a good experience at your practice and with your employees. The concept of delivering superior patient experience is steadily gaining momentum. More than 68 percent of marketers say they are focusing on improving customer experience.


Chatbots can give medical practices the chance to interact quickly with their target audience in a way that feels personal. There are at least 100,000 active bots on Facebook Messenger every month, and almost 2 billion messages are exchanged between businesses and their target audiences each month. In 2018, medical practices will have to step out of their comfort zones and focus on chatbots and messaging apps in order to deliver excellent patient service. Healthcare marketers will invest more time and effort in interaction with patients via messaging apps and chatbots. A combination of chatbots and messaging apps can significantly enhance the quality of patient service.

4. Influencer Marketing Will Continue to Rise

Social media influencers have an incredible reach, usually with followings in thousands or millions. Healthcare marketers are shifting toward paying these influencers to promote their products and services. Nearly 32 percent of US-based influencers say Facebook is the best social networking platform, while 24 percent of influencers think Instagram is the best.

Influencer marketing is believed to deliver 11 times the ROI compared to traditional marketing strategies, and more than 49 percent of new patients depend on influencers for choosing their next medical facility. This is not a passing trend, but a multibillion dollar industry. A lot of these social media influencers walk away with six-figure incomes, just by promoting brands to their followers.

More than 90 percent of healthcare marketers who employ an influencer marketing strategy to connect with new patients and improve engagement with existing patients believe it is successful. In 2018, more healthcare facilities will embrace influencer marketing as a way to communicate with their target audiences.

5. Instagram Stories Will Be More Popular

With Instagram Stories, you can publish content that lives for 24 hours before disappearing. This is believed to be the perfect way to keep your followers engaged without over-sharing content to your Instagram profile. In addition, you can hashtag relevant keywords to help target users find your posts quickly and easily.

Instagram Stories is perhaps the most significant change in the Instagram user interface, and the marketing opportunities that it provides are tremendous. Instagram Stories is also more lucrative from a marketing perspective because, unlike other social media platforms, Instagram metrics are trackable. This means healthcare marketers trying to connect with their target audience on Instagram must take the time to get on board with Instagram Stories.

Daily viewers of Instagram Stories have surpassed daily SnapChat viewers within one year after launch, and the growth is not expected to slow down in 2018. It is likely that more than 50 percent of all Instagram users will be using Instagram Stories by the end of 2018.

6. Organic Reach Strategies Are Likely to Decline

With an increasing number of businesses strengthening their presence on social networks, there was a need to invent measures to combat spam. This means marketers have to face a dramatic decline in organic reach. Due to less organic return, marketers have to be more selective about what and where to post.

Healthcare marketers need to stop relying on short-term tactics that once worked. Facebook has already announced that organic reach will soon be zero. 2018 is likely to be the year when we will feel the pinch on the organic reach of our social media content. While you must be creating and sharing the most genuine and relevant content, you need to understand that it is a pay-to-play world. With a lot of businesses increasingly disappearing from newsfeeds, ephemeral content is key to staying top-of-mind in 2018.

Instead, healthcare marketers need to start building sustainable social media strategies. This means carefully choosing networks where you post content and investing more in paid ads and influencer strategies.

7. Ephemeral Content Will Rule Patient Engagement

Ephemeral content is short-lived content that appears for just 24 hours and then disappears on its own. This type of content is gaining immense popularity among millennials and generation Z. Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook stories have led to the demand for ephemeral content. Because of the nature of content, the information is lost within hours, thus making your followers take fast action.

Ephemeral content is a great way to preview upcoming projects and showcase behind-the-scene content that is supposed to be short-lived. However, you will need an effective strategy in 2018 to engage your target audiences in the shortest possible time.

Your target audience will consider short-lived content more authentic, and it may motivate them to call your office and schedule an appointment.

8. Live Streaming Will Expand

The live-streaming market is growing at an alarming rate. While live streaming has been around for a while now, the way patients and healthcare brands are going to use them is likely to evolve. We are going to see a lot more of live streaming in 2018, and the brands that leverage it well will be rejoicing in the organic reach it will generate.

Live streaming was a $30 billion industry in 2016, and it is expected to more than double in size by 2021 to become a $70 billion industry. One of the biggest reasons you should care about live streaming is due to its massive user base and rising popularity. Live streaming is a nearly free way to drive lots of traffic to your social media profile and tons of revenue for your medical practice.

In 2018, more healthcare brands will harness the power of live streaming and will incorporate it into their healthcare content marketing strategy. Just like Facebook and Instagram, other social networks too will try to capitalize on the trend.

Wrapping Up

The role of social media marketing is expanding, and we expect a lot of changes in the social media landscape in 2018. One thing is sure: Social networks will offer brands more ways to create engaging content and more natural ways to share it. Most likely, video streaming and ephemeral content will go mainstream. Additionally, healthcare brands may turn to newer social platforms as Gen Z will spend a lot of their time there. This means healthcare marketers will need to strengthen their online presence in 2016. However, it is essential to stay informed on the behavior and preferences of your target audience.

It is critical to look forward to 2018 and adjust to the healthcare social media trends if you wish to remain competitive in the market.
If these trends have inspired you to begin transforming your medical practice’s social media marketing campaign, Practice Builders can help you. Not only do we have the experience and insight to point you in the right direction, but we also have the technology to make you achieve your business goals. For more information, contact us today.


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Is Pharma "Gamification" Up to Snuff?

Is Pharma "Gamification" Up to Snuff? | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Gamification can be found everywhere—from boardrooms to classrooms, and even on social media. The practice has gained widespread recognition over the last few years through its incorporation into marketing, healthcare, business, politics, and technology design. Subsequently, pharma is embracing the recent trend in healthcare gamification, and utilising this technology to engage both healthcare providers (HCPs) and payers (including patients).

 

Research and case studies provide evidence that healthcare gamification improves both patient compliance and health outcomes. Using gamification as part of a marketing strategy can help companies deliver their message to a wider audience and boost marketing efforts in several ways.

 

Gamification can promote therapies.Gamification can increase engagement between pharma, HCPs, and patients.Gamification can facilitate physician education.

 

Interactive creativity, coupled with proactive health information endorsement, can help build the reputation of brand, increase customer engagement, and improve consumer loyalty. Although gamification within pharma marketing is still in its early stages, with several challenges to successful implementation, the potential benefits are wide-reaching. Indeed, the effective use of gamification could take pharmaceutical marketing to entirely new heights.

 

Further Reading:

“Can Gamification Increase #Pharma Drug Brand Awareness?”; http://sco.lt/5EUjBp“Mission T1D - Sanofi Diabetes is on a Mission to Support Children with Type 1 Diabetes through Gaming”; http://sco.lt/5bRCNt“Is Pharma Gamification Dead in the Water?”; http://sco.lt/7simav“Gamification at Peak of Inflated Expectations & Near Trough of Disillusionment"; http://sco.lt/7Sya93“Pharma Games Must Be Careful Not to Incentivize Patients to Lie for Rewards”; http://sco.lt/4nX5H7
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, September 21, 2017 12:09 PM

The author claims that "gamification" improves patient compliance and health outcomes and that it can help pharma marketers deliver their message. Unfortunately, little evidence of this is provided. 

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How Cleveland Clinic connects with patients via social media

How Cleveland Clinic connects with patients via social media | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
The Cleveland Clinic also has a substantial base on social media and has been on Facebook since 2008 and now has about two million Facebook followers.

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How Wearable Technology is Transforming Healthcare? #Infographic

How Wearable Technology is Transforming Healthcare? #Infographic | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Health care providers are using wearable technology to enhance the clinical outcomes of sufferers of chronic diseases and improve clinician/patient engagement processes.
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25,000 data points per day: Wearable sensors can alert you when you are getting sick

25,000 data points per day: Wearable sensors can alert you when you are getting sick | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

A new wave of portable biosensors allows frequent measurement of health-related physiology. A group at Stanford investigated the use of these devices to monitor human physiological changes during various activities and their role in managing health and diagnosing and analyzing disease. By recording over 250,000 daily measurements for up to 43 individuals, they found personalized circadian differences in physiological parameters, replicating previous physiological findings. Interestingly, the research group also found striking changes in particular environments, such as airline flights (decreased peripheral capillary oxygen saturation [SpO2] and increased radiation exposure). These events are associated with physiological macro-phenotypes such as fatigue, providing a strong association between reduced pressure/oxygen and fatigue on high-altitude flights.

 

Importantly, when they combined biosensor information with frequent medical measurements, they made two important observations: First, wearable devices were useful in identification of early signs of Lyme disease and inflammatory responses; the research team used this information to develop a personalized, activity-based normalization framework to identify abnormal physiological signals from longitudinal data for facile disease detection. Second, wearables distinguish physiological differences between insulin-sensitive and -resistant individuals.

 

Overall, these results indicate that portable biosensors provide useful information for monitoring personal activities and physiology and are likely to play an important role in managing health and enabling affordable health care access to groups traditionally limited by socioeconomic class or remote geography.


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GSK and MIT Team Up to Test Flumoji - an Android App That May Provide RWE in Clinical Trials

GSK and MIT Team Up to Test Flumoji - an Android App That May Provide RWE in Clinical Trials | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Flumoji is your health wizard. Tell it how you feel and it will magically learn how to help protect you from Flu and other ailments.


This MIT study is designed to help increase awareness of the spread of flu and flu-like symptoms and educate you on how to reduce the risk of -- and help prevent -- flu infection. Your data along with other users of the app could potentially improve overall health outcomes in the general population.

 

Flumoji is being tested by MIT and GSK to see if it can speed up identification of flu outbreaks.

 

“Real-time tracking of seasonal flu outbreaks is key,” says GSK on Facebook. “However, researchers have yet to find a tracking mechanism that’s fast and reliable enough to support testing of potential #flu treatments in clinical trials.”


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rob halkes's curator insight, January 12, 2017 9:15 AM

RWE (real world evidence) and RWD (-data) bear the promise that we find context conditions and personal factores needed for #precisionmedicine ! It takes more to "tango" however, so it is good to see how initial collaborations begin to find ground!

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Big Tech And Pharma Bet On Cancer Therapy Startups: Celgene, Novartis, Pfizer, and Google’s Investments

Big Tech And Pharma Bet On Cancer Therapy Startups: Celgene, Novartis, Pfizer, and Google’s Investments | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Celgene has backed more than 15 companies since 2012. Google Ventures joined the list of top investors this year.

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The Power of Healthcare Storytelling | Klick Health

The Power of Healthcare Storytelling | Klick Health | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Big data has revealed the basic emotional arcs of stories, reinforcing what we’ve known all along—that great marketing is great storytelling. Let'
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The power of words when you know how to put it right.
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How AstraZeneca Plans to Bring Medical Meetings to Everyone via Social Media

How AstraZeneca Plans to Bring Medical Meetings to Everyone via Social Media | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

For decades, medical meetings have been a place for doctors, patients, researchers and advocates to engage with each other and share information about the latest advances in treatments and science.

 

That engagement level has exploded over the last few years, however, with the rise of social media. Now, attendees can talk not only to others in the meeting hall but also in every corner of the globe.

 

How important has social media grown to become at medical meetings? Consider: The 2013 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting saw 4,352 different people tweet 21,861 times using the #ASCO13 hashtag throughout the year. Two years later, the #ASCO15 meeting was mentioned in 81,273 tweets from 16,664 people – a nearly four-fold increase.

 

AstraZeneca once again will participate in major meetings in our therapeutic areas this year, including ASCO, AHA, ACC, ADA and several others. In addition to our live presence at the meetings, we hope to accomplish the following through our social engagement:

 

Conduct live, authentic dialogue with those in attendance as well as those following along virtually.Share our messages and resources with an informed, engaged audience.Continue conversations begun face to face in the meeting halls.Glean key areas of focus of those affected by the diseases being studied to better inform our efforts as a company.

 

It is increasingly crucial for all players in healthcare to be engaged in social media, as more and more Americans use these platforms.


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Pharma Guy's curator insight, June 28, 2016 7:15 AM

Astrazeneca has been a pioneer in hosting authentic Twitter chats. read, for example, “OMG! AstraZeneca Hosts Twitter Chat & World Does NOT End!”; http://bit.ly/AZpharmachat

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MARKETING IN HEALTHCARE patient centricity & digital transformation #hcsmeufr

MARKETING IN HEALTHCARE patient centricity & digital transformation #hcsmeufr | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

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Social listening could be right medicine for pharma companies

Social listening could be right medicine for pharma companies | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Pharmaceutical companies aren’t currently taking full advantage of the wealth of patient-generated content on social media channels. Deloitte’s Becca Ramble and Katy Balatero outline how these companies can set up successful social listening programmes to uncover patient insights while managing and mitigating risk.  

Social networks and online communities play an important role in consumer health management, serving as hubs where patients and caregivers meet to ask questions, share information, and compare experiences with treatments and medications.

The Deloitte Center for Health Solutions 2015 Survey of US Health Care Consumers found that 52pc of consumers actively search online for health-related information.

Patient-generated content on social networks can highlight the needs, wants and decision considerations of patients and healthcare providers.

This data can be a valuable source of insights for pharmaceutical companies seeking to understand how best to reach, engage, and support patients and healthcare practitioners.

Sharing, but not listening

Companies across a variety of industries are engaging in formal social listening activities.

Social listening involves monitoring social media channels to devise a strategy to help you better influence consumers.

Companies are using insights gleaned from social data to identify market opportunities, inform product and service design, strengthen customer relationships, build engaging customer experiences, manage PR crises, and much more.

Multiple departments, including marketing, customer experience, human resources, corporate communications, sales, and others, are tapping into paid, owned, and earned social media.

These companies recognise that social media listening means tapping into the world’s largest focus group, providing access to current and potential customers and the information they share.

Many pharmaceutical companies have a social media presence. They manage owned social channels, including corporate branded Facebook pages, LinkedIn accounts, and Twitter handles, to share corporate communications, investor relations, event announcements, and press releases. These companies broadcast information and listen on their managed channels, but often their activities end there.

Most are not looking beyond their own channels to understand how, when, and why patients and caregivers are sharing experiences with specific drugs, therapies, diseases, and conditions. Many of these companies are interested in listening and engaging but, when faced with the regulatory risks and considerations, including the discovery and reporting of adverse events, feel that the risks may outweigh the benefits.

While these are real concerns, a thoughtfully-executed social media listening strategy can be used to inform many areas across the business while effectively managing the regulatory risks and considerations.

It’s not all bad

Pharmaceutical companies fear that opening up social listening around their products will expose them to posts where authors share an “undesirable experience associated with the use of a medical product in a patient”, and that they will need to invest heavily in resources to manage adverse event reporting.

In the US, the FDA outlines four criteria that must be present for an adverse event to require reporting:

An identifiable patient: The post contains sufficient information to lead the reviewer to believe that a patient is involved.

An identifiable reporter: The post contains sufficient contact information to allow follow-up by the reviewer, including an email address, telephone number, or mailing address.

A specific medication: The post must mention a specific medication by brand name, or the chemical name of a medication if the compound is unique to one specific pharmaceutical brand.

An adverse event: The post describes a reaction that a “reasonable person” would consider to be an adverse event, such as death, hospitalisation, vomiting, swelling, or any side effect that is either unknown or unexpected with the medication.

However, studies have shown that less than 2pc of all posts mentioning pharmaceutical products and brands contain indicators of potential adverse events.

The structure and nature of most social media posts do not include the level of detail required to meet all four of these criteria. For example, forum threads where participants discuss experiences with a drug but use anonymous usernames or do not provide contact information would not qualify as adverse events. While any pharmaceutical company that engages in brand monitoring should expect to see some adverse event content, Pharmaceutical Commerce wrote that “the volume of adverse events is not likely to exceed what can be handled through existing adverse event reporting channels established for traditional/offline reporting methods”.

The art of social listening

By designing listening and monitoring efforts with their business goals in mind, pharmaceutical companies can develop and deploy strategic listening programmes while managing and mitigating risk. There are several approaches:

Using social media listening and monitoring technologies: Social media listening and monitoring tools allow companies to curate the social media content they need for their specific business goals. By using carefully-curated social media queries, the company can reduce their exposure to unintended content and minimise risk. Many of these tools include functionality to support tagging and reporting activities, if and when an adverse event is discovered, that can streamline the workflow and support the digital paper trail needed for compliance.

Developing visualisations and dashboards: Trend lines, pie charts, and other data visualisations aggregate social media content and organise it by subject matter, such as brand mentions, product groups or types, or patient journey segments. This approach serves up insights and analysis without requiring review of individual posts, thereby removing access and exposure to posts where adverse events may be present.

Exploring unbranded content for insights: Many patients post online about diseases, conditions, or therapy experiences without necessarily mentioning a specific drug or brand. Listening at this level can provide pharmaceutical companies firsthand access to trends, perception shifts, sentiment, and more, while minimising exposure to conversations of brand-related adverse events.

Regardless of the approach, the representatives of the pharmaceutical company who will be accessing and reading individual posts should be trained on adverse event identification. If they are exposed to a post where a potential adverse event is surfaced, it will help them perform due diligence to research the presence of the four FDA criteria.

Reaping the benefits

As brands seek to differentiate themselves through their marketing, products, or communication, a deep understanding of their audiences can play an integral role in meeting those objectives. Social media listening and analysis can inform strategies with actionable information about what people need and want, the language they use, and where they are gathering.

There are many benefits that make social media efforts worthwhile, especially if these programmes are approached with a clear understanding of and management strategy for the risks and regulations involved.


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Twitter shows side effects patients don't tell doctors | Daily

Twitter shows side effects patients don't tell doctors | Daily | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Scanning Twitter may help doctors learn more about the drugs they're prescribing. 

According to new research, they are more likely to find out about side effects patients are complaining about by looking online rather than what they say in a doctor's office.

A study looked at more than 20,000 Twitter posts to see what side effects people said they experienced with prednisolone, a commonly used steroid for allergies, blood disorders and even rheumatoid arthritis.

The research team used a computer system to identify tweets containing the drug name and any mention of a likely drug side-effect. For instance, it converted phrases like 'can't sleep', into more medical terms, like 'insomnia'.

 

Over the course of three years, they harvested 159,297 tweets mentioning prednisolon. 

 
+2
 

Lead author for the study, Professor Dixon, said: 'Less serious side-effects are often missed in other research because patients may not mention their symptoms to their doctors, or they are not recorded in medical records. Yet this is despite them being troublesome,'

Straight-talking online 

Around 20,000 of the tweets also mentioned a suspected side-effect. 

Of the tweets analysed, 1,737 mentioned insomnia, 1,656 mentioned weight gain, 1,576 mentioned non-specific reactions such as 'I hate Prednisolone', and 1,515 reported increased appetite. The research was published in the journal Digital Medicine, today.  

 
 

Even though they found patients most often expressed concerns over insomnia and weight gain, these are rarely brought up in conversations with physicians.

Both of these are well-known side effects of prednisolone, but the research tends to focus on more serious side-effects, like osteoporosis and fractures.

Share your symptoms 

The lead author for the study, Professor Dixon, added: 'Our view is that social media sources such as Twitter can be useful because they can illustrate which drug side-effects patients discuss most commonly, even if they are not necessarily the most serious.

 
+2
 

Even though they found patients most often expressed concerns over insomnia and weight gain, these are rarely brought up in conversations with physicians

CAN THE COST OF DRUGS ALTER THE SIDE EFFECTS?

People experience both the good and bad effects of a drug more intensely when they think it's expensive, a study showed in October.

Research published in Science demonstrated that the perceived cost of a drug can amplify the 'nocebo effect' which is the experience of side effects from a medication with no actual therapeutic effects.

German researchers at University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf applied a cream to the arms of their subjects and told them that one of the possible side effects was pain in the area.

The subjects that were given the ‘expensive’ cream not only reported higher pain levels, but scans of their brains showed greater activity in areas associated with the experience of pain.

 

'Less serious side-effects are often missed in other research because patients may not mention their symptoms to their doctors, or they are not recorded in medical records. Yet this is despite them being troublesome.

'This form of research is clearly just one piece of the jigsaw, but it nevertheless is an important one.

'In this example, it helps re-focus our research into steroid-related side effects that are clearly important to patients.

'Social media posts may also give us a future view of how side-effects impact on patients' quality of life.'

 

Dr Rikesh Patel, a member of the research team, says he believes using computer scanning as they have done is the future of getting more information on the side effects of drugs. 

'We believe social media such as Twitter can be used to broaden knowledge about drugs and potential side-effects that patients themselves find troublesome.

'And this type of automatic extraction is an efficient way of getting this information, because we're dealing with large volumes of data.   

 


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Digital Transformation of Healthcare: IoMT Connectivity, AI, and Value Streams

Digital Transformation of Healthcare: IoMT Connectivity, AI, and Value Streams | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

The Digital Transformation (DX) of Healthcare is imminent. A number of key advances in technology as well as digital transformation best practices are paving the way for a watershed year in Healthcare. In addition to the staggering and continuously rising cost of Healthcare, silos within Healthcare value streams as well errors in diagnostics and inconsistencies in patient data are some of the pervasive challenges in the healthcare industry. Consider this. Medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the United States!

These formidable challenges of Healthcare impact our pocketbooks and wellness. However, the Digital Transformation of Healthcare is also becoming a reality with tremendous benefits to patients, providers, and payers. More specifically, three complimentary technologies are now the pillars for Healthcare DX:

1.Internet of Things Connected Wellness and Medical Devices: This year also at CES 2018 there were 200 Digital Health technologies focusing on Wellness and Medical Devices with concrete benefits for the consumer. In addition medical devices are becoming increasingly intelligent, connected, and robust for delivering optimized healthcare services. There is even an acronym for it: Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) that aggregates connectivity of medical devices with Information Technology (IT).

2. Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare: AI for discovering patterns from connected healthcare monitoring devices as well as patient transactions are providing tremendous opportunities for preventive care. There are many different types of AI preventive care models. In addition to aggregating and mining models from patient data another benefit of AI in healthcare is to opt for a system of continuous learning within the system itself. Furthermore, the knowledge harvested from various medical sources including patients, connected devices, and medical staff such as doctors and nurses, can be digitized and automated. The combination or even “champion challenge” between care options mined and discovered from patient data vs. the knowledge of experts (e.g. doctors and nurses) provides increased opportunities in optimizing the patient care.


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Can Purdue Pharma Ease the Pain of #Opioid Victims with Apple Watches for Chronic Pain "Therapy"?

Can Purdue Pharma Ease the Pain of #Opioid Victims with Apple Watches for Chronic Pain "Therapy"? | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

Purdue Pharma and Geisinger announced today that the first patient has been enrolled in the companies’ upcoming trial of medical wearables as an alternative therapy for chronic pain.

The ResearchKit study looks to see how wearables (in this case, the Apple Watch) can alleviate pain without relying on pharmaceutical painkillers, a commendable goal for a company whose painkilling opioid OxyContin has been at the heart of the US’ ongoing opioid epidemic.

“What we are really looking at is whether we can we decrease pain, improve functioning, and reduce reliance on pain medication,” Dr. Tracy Mayne, Purdue’s head of medical affairs strategic research, told MobiHealthNews in March. “They aren’t all necessarily ... taking opioids, but these are very sick patients with chronic pain and a lot of comorbidities, and I would be very surprised if even some of them haven’t been on pain medication for a long time.”

In the non-randomized prospective trial, 240 adult multidisciplinary pain-program patients receiving treatment within the Geisinger healthcare system will receive an Apple Watch to measure physical activity, self-reported pain, heart rate, medication use, and other relevant variables over 12 months. The watches will be outfitted with a specialized pain app and healthcare provider dashboard that not only integrates with Geisinger’s EMR, but suggests alternative pain treatment strategies such as stretching, mindfulness, and thermotherapy.

“The goal of this technology is to improve patient function and quality of life while reducing the need for analgesic medications. It provides objective measures of numerous aspects of pain, function, and treatment effectiveness so that information can be gathered for the patient and the healthcare provider in between visits,” Dr. Tracy Mayne, head of medical affairs strategic research for Purdue Pharma, said in a statement. “We are pleased to partner with Geisinger on this important initiative and believe real-time data may have the potential to support an improved understanding of chronic pain patients’ experiences and needs.”


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Pharma Guy's curator insight, October 6, 2017 7:55 AM

I can't believe this crock of shite!

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Social Media And Ethical Concerns For Healthcare Professionals

Social Media And Ethical Concerns For Healthcare Professionals | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
While social media use in healthcare has the potential to bring value to patient-provider relationships, it is not without its ethical and professional challenges. This presentation looks at those challenges and suggests ways to deal with them.

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Art Jones's curator insight, August 29, 2017 11:53 AM

Risk vs. Reward

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MIT & GlaxoSmithKline launch flu tracking app Flumoji

MIT & GlaxoSmithKline launch flu tracking app Flumoji | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline and MIT Connection Science have launched a new flu app called Flumoji to help users track symptoms & share that information with researchers working to improve disease surveillance.

Cases of the flu have increased nationally as the season begins to hit its usual peak. Tracking the activity of such an ubiqutious disease can help public health officials guide limited resources to the areas where they could get the most bang for their buck.

We’ve seen interesting uses of digital health for flu tracking in recent years, ranging from medical apps to guide flu treatment to the use of social media and internet searches to track activity. Flumoji is an Android app that includes educational material about the flu as well as symptom tracking features, which includes collection of data already being captured by the phone:

…the Flumoji app tracks a variety of real-time data from a user’s phone in order to detect fluctuations in a user’s activity levels, social levels, and general routine. These fluctuations are used to predict whether a user is experiencing a flu-like outbreak. Real-time data is only collected during the flu season.

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The Benefits of Twitter for Scientists » American Scientist

The Benefits of Twitter for Scientists » American Scientist | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
The Benefits of Twitter for Scientists
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Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, January 19, 2017 11:52 AM
usage of twitter is indeed growing to circulate information, and why not teach and learn
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The Digital Patient Journey

The Digital Patient Journey | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
KEY TAKEAWAY: We can’t assume that being an empowered patient is a positive experience. Many patients enter a maze of online health information, coupled with managing appointments with multip…

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Astronauts to trial healthcare wearables in space 

Astronauts to trial healthcare wearables in space  | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it

A 'smart shirt' designed to remotely monitor the wearer's health via a series of sensors is set to be tested in space in an upcoming mission by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA).


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Can Online Articles Improve Patient Education, Engagement?

Can Online Articles Improve Patient Education, Engagement? | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Research suggests that patients enjoy reading about healthcare in online blogs, and that it may help boost their patient education and engagement.

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Nokia aligns digital health with hospital’s stroke recovery programs, clinical trials

Nokia aligns digital health with hospital’s stroke recovery programs, clinical trials | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
brainsJust a few months after Nokia acquired Withings to make a big push into digital health, it has collaborated with Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Faculty of Medicine to support outpatient care and clinical trials, according to a company statement.Nokia Technologies and Helsinki University Hospital will launch a remote patient monitoring solution in the second quarter, the statement said. The collaboration is a first for Nokia Technologies, reflecting the company’s intent to enter the regulated healthcare space.
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Bayer: creating fertile ground for new digital ideas

Bayer: creating fertile ground for new digital ideas | Healthcare and pharma in social media | Scoop.it
Bayer creating fertile ground for new digital ideas - Articles Bayer's head of digital development, Jessica Federer, says the company is transforming its business and relationships through digital initiatives – but won't lose sight of its core expertise.

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