Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service
6.5K views | +0 today
Follow
Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service
How technology and sharing change healthcare
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from WEARABLES - INSIDABLES - IOT - CONNECTED DEVICES - QUANTIFIEDSELF
Scoop.it!

Leaked Nokia memo says no path forward for ‘struggling’ digital health business #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth #hcsmeu

Leaked Nokia memo says no path forward for ‘struggling’ digital health business #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth #hcsmeu | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it

Nokia got into health tech with its purchase of Withings two years ago. An internal memo seen by The Verge suggests the business is in bad shape.


Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Le Monde de la pharma & de la santé connectée
Scoop.it!

Digital treatments can be real medicine

Digital treatments can be real medicine | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it

What if an app could replace a pill? That’s the big question behind an emerging trend known as “digital therapeutics.” The idea: software that can improve a person’s health as much as a drug can, but without the same cost and side-effects.

Digital therapeutics, or “digiceuticals,” as some call them, have become a Holy Grail in some quarters of Silicon Valley, where investors see the chance to deliver medicine through your smartphone. Andreessen Horowitz, the venture firm, even predicts digital drugs will become “the third phase” of medicine, meaning the successor to the chemical and protein drugs we have now, but without the billion-dollar cost of bringing one to market.  

 


Via Giuseppe Fattori, Esposito Christelle
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Pharma Hub
Scoop.it!

3D printing drugs: more precise, more personalised 

3D printing drugs: more precise, more personalised  | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it

Printing out your own medicines is a long way off, but the possibilities are truly exciting 


Via Denise Silber, Philippe Marchal
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from The 21st Century
Scoop.it!

Finding your ‘zone’ and staying there: rituals for sustained concentration - Dr Peta Freestone

Finding your ‘zone’ and staying there: rituals for sustained concentration - Dr Peta Freestone | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
“Flow. Getting in the zone. Whatever you call it, you’ve got to go there. And you’ve got to be able to stay there long enough to make meaningful progress.”
Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service
Scoop.it!

mHealth and Digital Masters : Novartis Vs Kodak

During years, pharma companies have been trying to bring more value to patients and physicians by using mHealth. In this study we observed the consequences of …

Via Plus91, Rémy TESTON, Gilles Jourquin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Digital Pharma news
Scoop.it!

mHealth and Digital Masters : Novartis Vs Kodak

During years, pharma companies have been trying to bring more value to patients and physicians by using mHealth. In this study we observed the consequences of …

Via Plus91, Rémy TESTON
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Compounding Pharmacy
Scoop.it!

1 in 4 Cardiovascular Related Deaths Can Be Prevented

1 in 4 Cardiovascular Related Deaths Can Be Prevented | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
“ More than half of preventable heart disease and stroke deaths happen to people under 65.”
Via Dr. Anas Bahnassi
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Newly discovered bacteria can eat plastic bottles

Newly discovered bacteria can eat plastic bottles | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
“A team of Japanese scientists has found a species of bacteria that eats the type of plastic found in most disposable water bottles.”

The discovery, published Thursday in the journal Science, could lead to new methods to manage the more than 50 million tons of this particular type of plastic produced globally each year.

The plastic found in water bottles is known as polyethylene terephthalate, or PET. It is also found in polyester clothing, frozen-dinner trays and blister packaging.

"If you walk down the aisle in Wal-Mart you're seeing a lot of PET," said Tracy Mincer, who studies plastics in the ocean at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. Part of the appeal of PET is that it is lightweight, colorless and strong. However, it has also been notoriously resistant to being broken down by microbes-what experts call "biodegradation." Previous studies had found a few species of fungi can grow on PET, but until now, no one had found any microbes that can eat it.

To find the plastic-eating bacterium described in the study, the Japanese research team from Kyoto Institute of Technology and Keio University collected 250 PET-contaminated samples including sediment, soil and wastewater from a plastic bottle recycling site.

Next they screened the microbes living on the samples to see whether any of them were eating the PET and using it to grow. They originally found a consortium of bugs that appeared to break down a PET film, but they eventually discovered that just one of bacteria species was responsible for the PET degradation. They named it Ideonella sakainesis.

Further tests in the lab revealed that it used two enzymes to break down the PET. After adhering to the PET surface, the bacteria secretes one enzyme onto the PET to generate an intermediate chemical. That chemical is then taken up by the cell, where another enzyme breaks it down even further, providing the bacteria with carbon and energy to grow.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from PHARMA NEWS, MULTICHANNEL & CROSSCHANNEL MAKETING
Scoop.it!

2016 Digital Health Top 10 Trends | Healthware International

2016 Digital Health Top 10 Trends | Healthware International | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
“ Healthware’s Digital Health Top 10 trends for 2016”
Via Olivier Delannoy, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Cancer-Causing HPV Rates Fall Dramatically In Teenage Girls Following Vaccination

Cancer-Causing HPV Rates Fall Dramatically In Teenage Girls Following Vaccination | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it

Vaccines are the best resource in our fight against preventable diseases, and sometimes they work even better than we could have hoped for. This seems to be the emerging case for the human papillomavirus, or HPV, vaccine, which was introduced just a decade ago to combat the virus that causes cervical cancer, among others. Although there are more than 100 different strains of HPV, only a small number are associated with cancer, and it is these that the vaccine targets. More specifically, four are high risk for genital cancer.

Types 16 and 18, for instance, cause 70 percent of cervical cancers.

According to a new study, published in Pediatrics, in the last 10 years the prevalence of the virus, or more specifically these four types, in teenage girls has fallen by 64 percent in the U.S., concomitant with the release of the vaccine. The study also highlights that among women aged 20 to 24, who had on average lower vaccination rates, the most dangerous strains of the virus fell by 34 percent. The vaccine is usually administered before puberty because HPV is sexually transmittable.

As always people have questioned the protection given by the vaccine, but the evidence for it is overwhelming. In Australia, the vaccine is offered for free to schoolgirls and that accomplished a 92 percent reduction in genital warts in women under the age of 21 over the period 2007 to 2011.

In the United States, the vaccine is largely optional and the debate is often linked to underage sexual activities rather than cancer prevention. Dozens of cancers centers, as well as pediatrics associations, are actively endorsing the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine.

“Multiple studies have shown the importance of a strong provider recommendation for increasing vaccination coverage,” said to the New York Times Dr. Lauri E. Markowitz, a medical epidemiologist at the National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases, a division of the C.D.C., who led the research for the latest study.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Digitized Health
Scoop.it!

Survey: U.S. Adults Becoming More Open to Sharing Health Data with Providers | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology

Survey: U.S. Adults Becoming More Open to Sharing Health Data with Providers | Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
Rajiv LeventhalAmericans are becoming increasingly willing to share their health information with providers, according to a recent survey from the Pew Research Center.
Via Emmanuel Capitaine
Gilles Jourquin's insight:
In europe too
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from PHARMA NEWS, MULTICHANNEL & CROSSCHANNEL MAKETING
Scoop.it!

Reflections on pharma marketing excellence

Reflections on pharma marketing excellence | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it

Via COUCH Medcomms, eMedToday, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from PHARMA NEWS, MULTICHANNEL & CROSSCHANNEL MAKETING
Scoop.it!

Samsung beats pharma to develop first EU-approved Enbrel biosimilar | Pharmafile

Samsung beats pharma to develop first EU-approved Enbrel biosimilar | Pharmafile | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
“Pharmafile.com is a leading portal for the pharmaceutical industry, providing industry professionals with pharma news, jobs, events, and service company listings.”
Via Vigie Pharma by ConsuMed Research, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Augmented reality Trends
Scoop.it!

Four Ways to Connect Older People to Digital Health

Four Ways to Connect Older People to Digital Health | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
Understanding the user experience and audience is key when developing any digital health technology.
Via eMedToday, Gilles Jourquin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Digital Disruption in Pharma
Scoop.it!

Silicon Valley and Digital Therapeutics Vow to Go Beyond the Pill. But Is It Worth the Price?

Silicon Valley and Digital Therapeutics Vow to Go Beyond the Pill. But Is It Worth the Price? | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it

What if an app could replace a pill? That’s the big question behind an emerging trend known as “digital therapeutics.” The idea: software that can improve a person’s health as much as a drug can, but without the same cost and side-effects.

 

Digital therapeutics, or “digiceuticals,” as some call them, have become a Holy Grail in some quarters of Silicon Valley, where investors see the chance to deliver medicine through your smartphone. Andreessen Horowitz, the venture firm, even predicts digital drugs will become “the third phase” of medicine, meaning the successor to the chemical and protein drugs we have now, but without the billion-dollar cost of bringing one to market.

 

About a dozen startups now call themselves digital therapeutics providers, and say they’re distinct from the rest of the digital health market of activity monitors, smart scales, and sleep trackers.

 

To distinguish themselves from “wellness” gadgets, digital therapeutics companies tend to carry out clinical tests and sometimes seek regulatory approvals –one company, Welldoc, offers a prescription-only version of its BlueStar phone app for managing diabetes, which it terms the “first FDA-cleared mobile prescription therapy.” But unlike drugs, digital therapeutics don’t usually need approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, since often they promote lifestyle or dietary changes that are deemed to be low-risk.

 

Whether a digital therapeutic involves a tracking sensor or coaching though an app, the biggest question is whether they provide a distinct, measureable medical benefit. One startup calling itself a digital therapeutics company is Virta Health, based in San Francisco. The company raised $37 million in March. Its goal is to actually “reverse” diabetes without drugs or surgery using online coaching to get people on a special diet high in fats and low on carbs. It has a study by Indiana State University to back up the claim—about half of the 262 people with type 2 diabetes enrolled in a 10-week trial were able to reduce their blood glucose levels to non-diabetic ranges.

 

Some digital companies are already allying with pharmaceutical makers. One, Propeller Health, inked a deal with GlaxoSmithKline for what it calls a “digitally guided therapy” platform (read “GSK #pharma Propels Ahead by Targeting COPD Adherence with IoT Inhaler”; http://sco.lt/8vnt8z). The approach combines Glaxo’s asthma medications with sensors, made by Propeller, that patients attach to their inhalers to monitor when they’re used. Patients who get feedback from Propeller’s app end up using the medication less often.

 

Some drug company executives remain skeptical. Robert Plenge, vice president at Merck’s research labs, had to look up “digital therapeutics” when asked whether they were important. “I don’t totally understand what you mean,” he says. “Which might in and of itself be your answer.” Plenge doesn’t think the idea would have much impact on drug development and questioned whether digital companies will be able to prove their offerings are worth the price.

 

Further Reading:

“Will Silicon Valley Startups & Empowered Patients Replace #BigPharma?”; http://sco.lt/9FmPDN“AMA CEO Calls Out Medical Apps as ‘Digital Snake Oil’"; http://sco.lt/8zuIld“Silicon Valley & Pharma
Via Pharma Guy
more...
Utsav Rawat's curator insight, April 10, 2017 11:37 AM
Innovation in healthcare
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Pharma Hub
Scoop.it!

Amazon has quietly launched an exclusive line of over-the-counter health products

Amazon has quietly launched an exclusive line of over-the-counter health products | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
The products could spark a price war and put pressure on other store-brand profit margins.
Via Philippe Marchal
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Digital Health
Scoop.it!

Samsung wants to help you monitor your baby’s health with it’s new smart carrier

Samsung wants to help you monitor your baby’s health with it’s new smart carrier | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
Samsung’s C-Lab has just released its latest innovation, a new gadget designed to make early parenthood a little easier.The smart baby carrier, called Dr. Macaron, has several functions that help a parent carry their newborn and know how healthy they are at any minute of the day.Dr. Macaron distributes the baby’s weight away from one part of the parent’s body using a convertible hipseat system that’s adjustable with just one hand.
Via Alex Butler
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Digital Pharma news
Scoop.it!

Virtual Conferencing: A Roadmap for Pharma

A pragmatic Roadmap for the pharmaceutical and medtech industries to digitize their conference and events channels. Presentation is a follow-up to an earler de…

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Rémy TESTON
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Digital Pharma news
Scoop.it!

McKinsey & Google: Pharma needs to seize social media opportunity

McKinsey & Google: Pharma needs to seize social media opportunity | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it

Pharmaceutical companies are missing out a major opportunity to grow their brands: social media. That’s according to a newly published e-book from McKinsey & Co., Google and The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

“Historic mixes of advertising in traditional media combined with heavy salesforce coverage and ‘push’ messaging are insufficient,” the publication said. “While each of those tactics remains relevant, today’s commercial mix should reflect the fact that people are now viewing digital channels close to 50 percent of the time, and, even more importantly, that those people seek real engagement in regards to their care.”

From the e-book:

The most innovative marketers today are finding ways to solve a problem, delight, inspire, or empathize with patients right in the flow of what they are doing (instead of interrupting to push a message to them). Similarly, more and more HCPs use digital tools and media to confirm facts and as a way to connect with others for clinical advice as well as emotional support.

Indeed, according to the report, one of every 20 Google searches today is for health information, the book said. That’s grown 15 percent a year since 2011.

“As a result, pharma companies need to make a mindset shift from ‘telling’ to ‘listening’ and then (eventually) ‘engaging’ because patients are no longer passive recipients of care. Rather, they are active shapers of their care,” the McKinsey-Google-Wharton team wrote in the e-book, entitled, “Pharma 3D: Rewriting the script for marketing in the digital age.”

“Pharma 3D” stands for discover, design and deliver. “The 3D approach has helped scores of organizations across industries innovate their approaches to digital engagement,” said the lengthy document, which includes numerous case studies. (The authors promised to update the e-book with additional case studies in the future.)

They said that companies with a high “digital quotient” experience twice the rate of revenue growth as those that do not. “The investment in this considerable change is worth it,” the book said.


Via Plus91, Rémy TESTON
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Triple entanglement in three dimensions: Three "twisted" photons entangled

Triple entanglement in three dimensions: Three "twisted" photons entangled | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it

Researchers at the Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI), the University of Vienna, and the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona have achieved a new milestone in quantum physics: they were able to entangle three particles of light in a high-dimensional quantum property related to the "twist" of their wavefront structure. Just like Schrödinger's famous cat that is simultaneously dead and alive, all previous demonstrations of multi-particle entanglement have been with quantum objects in two discrete levels, or dimensions. The twisted photons used in the Vienna experiment have no such limit to their dimensionality, and can simultaneously exist in three or more quantum states. The three-photon entangled state created by the Vienna group breaks this previous record of dimensionality, and brings to light a new form of asymmetric entanglement that has not been observed before. The results from their experiment appear in the journal Nature Photonics.Entanglement is a counterintuitive property of quantum physics that has long puzzled scientists and philosophers alike. Entangled quanta of light seem to exert an influence on each other, irrespective of how much distance is between them. Consider for example a metaphorical quantum ice dancer, who has the uncanny ability to pirouette both clockwise and counter-clockwise simultaneously. A pair of entangled ice-dancers whirling away from each other would then have perfectly correlated directions of rotation: If the first dancer twirls clockwise then so does her partner, even if skating in ice rinks on two different continents. "The entangled photons in our experiment can be illustrated by not two, but three such ice dancers, dancing a perfectly synchronized quantum mechanical ballet," explains Mehul Malik, the first author of the paper. "Their dance is also a bit more complex, with two of the dancers performing yet another correlated movement in addition to pirouetting. This type of asymmetric quantum entanglement has been predicted before on paper, but we are the first to actually create it in the lab."The scientists created their three-photon entangled state by using yet another quantum mechanical trick: they combined two pairs of high-dimensionally entangled photons in such a manner that it became impossible to ascertain where a particular photon came from. Besides serving as a test bed for studying many fundamental concepts in quantum mechanics, multi-photon entangled states such as these have applications ranging from quantum computing to quantum encryption. Along these lines, the authors of this study have developed a new type of quantum cryptographic protocol using their state that allows different layers of information to be shared asymmetrically among multiple parties with unconditional security. "The experiment opens the door for a future quantum Internet with more than two partners and it allows them to communicate more than one bit per photon," says Anton Zeilinger. Many technical challenges remain before such a quantum communication protocol becomes a practical reality. However, given the rapid progress in quantum technologies today, it is only a matter of time before this type of entanglement finds a place in the quantum networks of the future.Publication in "Nature Photonics": Multi-Photon Entanglement in High Dimensions: Mehul Malik, Manuel Erhard, Marcus Huber, Mario Krenn, Robert Fickler, Anton Zeilinger. Nature Photonics, 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2016.12.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from PHARMA NEWS, MULTICHANNEL & CROSSCHANNEL MAKETING
Scoop.it!

Survey: Usability trumps trustworthiness for consumers' health website preferences

Survey: Usability trumps trustworthiness for consumers' health website preferences | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
“Consumers care more about ease of use than trustworthiness when it comes to looking up health information online, according to a Makovsky survey of 1,035 US adults that was fielded by market research firm Kelton.”
Via Bruno Demay, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
Rémy TESTON's curator insight, March 12, 2016 3:50 AM

Physician are not perceived as the best information source : the beginning of patient empowerment

Pategou Joseph @HealthcareLover's curator insight, March 13, 2016 4:10 AM

Physician are not perceived as the best information source : the beginning of patient empowerment

Melanie COVINHES's curator insight, March 14, 2016 6:32 AM

Physician are not perceived as the best information source : the beginning of patient empowerment

Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement
Scoop.it!

Consumers’ Use of Health Apps and Wearables Doubled in Past Two Years, Accenture Survey Finds | Accenture Newsroom

Consumers’ Use of Health Apps and Wearables Doubled in Past Two Years, Accenture Survey Finds | Accenture Newsroom | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
The number of US consumers who use wearables and mobile apps for managing their health has doubled in the past two years, says Accenture.
Via eMedToday
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from PHARMA NEWS, MULTICHANNEL & CROSSCHANNEL MAKETING
Scoop.it!

Report: Personalized Medicine Is Having A Positive Measurable Effect on Patient Outcomes

Report: Personalized Medicine Is Having A Positive Measurable Effect on Patient Outcomes | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
A new approach to research, pharmaceutical development, and clinical care is remaking healthcare. Known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, it p
Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from WEARABLES - INSIDABLES - IOT - CONNECTED DEVICES - QUANTIFIEDSELF
Scoop.it!

Do you really need 10,000 steps a day?

Do you really need 10,000 steps a day? | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
“Do you really need 10,000 steps a day?”
Via Julie O'Donnell, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
Julie O'Donnell's curator insight, February 14, 2016 12:12 PM

Shocker - it's not how many steps you take it's how you take them!

Rescooped by Gilles Jourquin from Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification
Scoop.it!

Game Genre Map: The Cognitive Threshold in Strategy Games

Game Genre Map: The Cognitive Threshold in Strategy Games | Health3.0- Migration towards Health as a Service | Scoop.it
Using data from over 140,000 gamers worldwide, we map out games in the Strategy genre to reveal the cognitive threshold between Strategy and Excitement.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
Laborious Cretin's comment, February 12, 2016 8:45 AM
Study suggests playing video games improves real-world navigation skills http://www.dailydot.com/geek/video-games-navigation-study/?tw=dd Action game players make more correct decisions per unit time. http://www.gizmag.com/video-games-increase-decision-making-abilities/16397/ What types of video games improve brain function? http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151001093837.htm Playlist (9 talks): Talks on how games can improve your life https://www.ted.com/playlists/274/talks_on_how_games_can_improve