Health Innovation
2.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Health Innovation
CreateHealth.io is helping healthcare to innovate. This is a showcase of our work and that of other leading innovators.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social media in healthcare report 2014

A report by IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics on the use of social media in healthcare by both patients and professionals.

Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Be Careful What You “Like”: Healthcare Industry Should Consider Privacy, Adverse Events, and Promotional Issues in Social Media Interactions

Be Careful What You “Like”: Healthcare Industry Should Consider Privacy, Adverse Events, and Promotional Issues in Social Media Interactions | Health Innovation | Scoop.it


Social media offers the healthcare industry an opportunity to engage with patients, care givers, and physicians on health care topics in real-time. While Jennifer Chillas, Senior Counsel at Bristol-Myers Squibb, believes social media is an attractive frontier, she offered many thought-provoking considerations regarding company comment sections and real-time interactions via Facebook and Twitter at the recent Pharmaceutical Compliance Congress. In her presentation "Compliant Social Interactions and Engagements," Chillas spoke specifically about patient privacy, adverse event reporting, and promotional issues related to user generated content (UGC).

Chillas began her presentation with survey statistics about online consumer behavior related to healthcare. In 2012, 72 percent more people reported to looking online for health information over the previous year. One-third of the respondents used the online information to figure out what health condition they had, 53 percent talked to their physician about the information, and 41 percent stated that they had their online condition confirmed by a clinician.

The internet is a powerful tool for the healthcare industry.

The survey also revealed that 77 percent of the online health seekers began their search at a search engine; 13 percent stated that they started at a medical information website, such as WebMD. Chillas noted that this research only reveals where searchers start. It is likely that many users follow up their initial research with social media sites, including Facebook, Twitter, and interactive comment sections on third party webpages.

Chillas believes social media offers pharmaceutical companies the important opportunity to engage with patients, caregivers, and healthcare professionals on topics for which the company has unique and valuable insights. If pharma does not engage, she argues, consumers could get confused about where information is coming from on various websites. Consumers may believe a pharmaceutical company sponsors a particular Facebook page for a disease or product when that is not the case.

Companies have been wary to engage in social media promotion so far—to much risk, too little guidance. Now that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued some direction, companies may be tempted to move too quickly into a still uncertain environment. Chillas offered three specific considerations for the social media realm.

(1)    Patient Privacy:

Social media offers companies the unique opportunity to monitor what is being said about a company or brand. Companies are familiar with examining a controlled environment when they sift through market data.But controls do not exist when companies track social media.

Anyone who has spent time sifting through the comments section of a website knows that attempting to quantify such qualitative data would be challenging, but potentially profitable. Chillas calls this "social listening," and believes it provides useful company insights.

Social listening, however, raises privacy concerns. Chillas believes that companies should first take a careful look at their privacy policy on social media interactions. Specifically, companies need to follow their policy requirements, and update their policy when their practice changes.

This seems obvious, but the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has been active in measuring companies' conduct up to their privacy policies. The FTC has settled with Google, MySpace, and Epic over discrepancies between what a company states in its privacy policy and how it acts. The issue that has made the most news involves companies that turn over "cookies" to advertisers, who then put on specific ads to address what people search for. "History sniffing" is still legal, and we all know it still happens, but companies now disclose it in their privacy policy.

To make privacy matters more complicated, Chillas notes that the European Union has a different privacy regime than the FTC. The FTC generally enforces under Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices; the EU has their own set of laws. The EU prohibits identifiable data transfer outside of the EU into the United States. This makes it challenging for a company that operates globally and collects personal information in some of its locations. There is a US-EU safe harbor that allows companies to transfer information if they have certified that they are compliant (available here).

State consumer protection and privacy laws pose additional requirements. For example, California requires companies to post privacy policies on their websites. California recently sued Delta Airlines over a mobile app that allowed users to figure out the location of their flight. Delta did not have a privacy policy, and had to comply with California law within 30 days of the action. In light of state privacy laws, companies need to disclose in their policies whether their web activities will follow a user online despite the fact that a user's browser tells them not to track.

Finally, company-wide conversations about online privacy should include physician-patient privacy under the Federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). HIPAA covers the use and disclosure of patient health information by healthcare providers. Conversation between pharmaceutical companies and patients is normally not covered by HIPAA. But, Chillas asks, how should a company prevent the healthcare provider, who is chatting on a company controlled social media site, from disclosing a patient's information and getting in trouble because the physician information is public?

Chillas listed out practical implications with regards to privacy in the social media context.

  1. Is the source of listening data public or private? If companies are pooling data from private sites, where users have to log in and subscribe, companies must disclose that they will turn over information if that is the company practice.
  2. Where does the listening occur and is there data transfer across countries? Companies need to certify their data with the EU if they do not hold their social listening to specific geographic areas.
  3. Vendor selection, contracting, training: Chillas believes this is an important issue. Most pharmaceutical companies will use third-party vendors to do their social-listening research; however, vendors—the ones who actually use consumer data—are often not up-to-date on privacy considerations. Thus, the onus is often on the company to appreciate the legal framework and choose their vendors accordingly.
  4. Third party sites versus Pharma-controlled sites: Companies need to consider whose privacy policy controls when internet users invariably move from one site to the next. Chillas recommends that companies think now about whether they will work with third parties whose privacy policies are inconsistent, and how to make it work.
  5. Pharma-controlled websites: How is data collected? How is it used? Who is disclosing the information?

Chillas recommends that companies work through the issues in advance. Above all, companies should have a privacy policy that properly addresses how the company will use the information they gather from social listening.

(2)    Adverse Event Reporting

The FDA approves drugs with the understanding that adverse reactions may become apparent only after a drug is used more widely, under more diverse conditions (such as combined with other drugs), or prescribed for uses for which the drug was not approved ("off-label" uses).

Pharmaceutical companies must report information pertinent to the safety and effectiveness of the drug from any source within 15 days of the initial discovery of any unexpected side effects or injuries associated with the drug, not provided for on the label. The FDA requires companies to report if they have (1) an identifiable patient, (2) an identifiable reporter, (3) an adverse event, and (4) a specific product.

Within the social media context, discussion of potential adverse effects can be very informal, such as "it didn't work for me." But even that statement could indicate a lack of efficacy, worthy of reporting. Chillas realizes there is a need to train social-monitoring vendors to search for these statements, but understands that finding a reportable adverse event is anything but cut-and-dry.

Some companies take the position that social media posts rarely satisfy the FDA's four adverse event reporting requirements (specific medication, adverse experience, identifiable patient, and identifiable reporter). Social media posts arguably will often fail to provide the first two required data elements of a reportable event due to the anonymity of membership to most social media sites. Without a patient's real name and other identifying facts, the poster might no be "an identifiable person reporting the event."

Chillas is hesitant to agree with pharmaceutical companies who have taken this position. "There is a view out there that if you don't have a patient's first and last name and a reporter's first and last name that that is not reportable," Chillas says. She believes the issue, then, is whether companies "should at least turn this info into the Pharmacovigilance department and let them decide, because some follow-up might take place." She notes that this can also raise privacy concerns if the venue does not allow for private messaging. Chillas suggests  companies should consider a "prepared response to encourage that person talking online to call in the adverse events."

Vendor and employee training is going to be a large aspect in the social listening sphere because of the informality of what they are going to be seeing. Adverse event reporting necessitates that companies spend money and invest personnel into monitoring user-generated content, especially on pharma controlled site. That seems to be the new reality if companies want to take advantage of real time communication.

Finally, Chillas notes that social media users who discuss arguably adverse events are doing so on an open site. The FDA can see it. Thus, "underreporting issues can be easily challenged by regulatory authorities on public sites."

(3)    Promotional Issues

Chillas notes that disease awareness and help-seeking materials are not regulated by the FDA as product promotion. Many websites educate people on disease issues. But, of course, there are numerous FDA regulations for product promotion: substantial evidence, consistency with labeling, fair and balanced promotion, fair prescribing information, etc. Attempting to satisfy the FDA with social media space constraints is a tough task.

The FDA Draft Guidance on Interactive Media Promotional states: "A firm generally is not responsible for UGC that is truly independent of the firm (i.e., is not produced by, or on behalf of, or prompted by the firm in any particular). FDA will not ordinarily view UGC on firm owned or firm controlled venues such as blogs, message boards, and chat rooms as promotional content on behalf of the firm as long as the user has no affiliation with the firm and the firm had no influence on the UGC."

Chillas wonders if this allowance actually frees companies up as much as some industry-stakeholders believe.

Chillas thinks that at the very least, the FDA Draft guidance obliges company's to monitor their employees' social media interactions. In complying with the FDA, companies also have to worry about state employee laws: when drafting policies about employee postings, the company cannot legally prevent an employee from ever talking about the company. However, the company has to balance being overly proscriptive with educating employees about proper social media conduct. 

To illustrate, imagine the likely scenario where an employee "likes" a company webpage, or even "likes" a user-generated comment. If an employee endorses an off-label use even through social media "thumbs-up" approval, this could raise tough issues for a company. Companies have to make sure that employee interactions do not constitute overstatements of product efficacy and minimization of risks.

Chillas believes that the FDA Draft Guidance on Unsolicited Requests provides a glimpse at how "loose" the new standard is:

"Example 8: A firm asks or otherwise encourages users to post videos about their own uses of its product on third party video-sharing sites (e.g., YouTube), which may result in video postings about an off-label use of its product. If the firm's initial request for posting of videos results in any questions about off-label uses, or if any off-label video posting made in response to the firm's encouragement of video postings results in questions about the product's off label use, these questions would be considered solicited requests."

This guidance raises the issue of prompting. More specifically, Chillas notes that there is a very fine line between an express invitations to post versus technology that permits posting. Chillas posits that "even if user-generated content is not the company's responsibility," the company is responsibility for what it does or doesn't do next.

Can a company simply just step away when users pose questions about off-label topics or post potential adverse events? Likely not. Furthermore, if the comment section on a company site is moderated, the company has to be careful about any intervention in the comment section. If the website moderator takes away all the negative comments, and leaves the positives, that is not exactly demonstrative of "UGC that is truly independent from the firm," as the FDA guidance requires.

Chillas notes that it might be best for companies to have prepared answers to address potential problem areas.

The FDA is not the only one who will be interested in social media information. The Department of Justice, State Attorney Generals, Consumer Protection agencies, and, of course, patient attorneys and products liability attorneys.

"The internet is not always a friendly place," Chillas warns.

Hopefully the FDA brings additional guidance so that companies can at least know the regulatory framework and deal with the customers in turn.

- See more at: http://www.policymed.com/2014/02/be-careful-what-you-like-healthcare-industry-should-consider-privacy-adverse-events-and-promotional-issues-in-social.html#sthash.VRVbXn5q.dpuf


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

The three critical factors wearable devices need to succeed

The three critical factors wearable devices need to succeed | Health Innovation | Scoop.it

Wearables may be the tech du jour, but the next generation of devices and services needs to focus more on keeping users engaged in the long-term. These three factors, based on behavioral science, can help them do just that.


1. Habit formation. Sustained engagement depends on a device or service’s ability to help the user form and stick with new habits. Wearable devices have the potential, all too often unrealized, to make the process of habit formation more effective and efficient than ever before. The best engagement strategies for wearables move beyond just presenting data (steps, calories, stairs) and directly address the elements of the habit loop (cue, routine, reward), triggering the deep-seated psychological sequences that lead to the establishment of new habits.


2. Social motivation. To sustain engagement beyond the initial habit formation, a device or service must be able to motivate users effectively. Social connections are a particularly powerful source of motivation that can be leveraged in many creative ways. In addition to using social connections to influence behavior, social media and networking sites can be exploited to alter habits for positive outcomes.


3. Goal reinforcement. To achieve sustained engagement, a user also needs to experience a feeling of progress toward defined goals. Research shows that achieving several smaller goals provides the positive momentum necessary for achieving bigger goals. Wearable products and services that help people experience continuous progress can do so, for example, through real-time updates that are powered by big data and insights. Facilitating personal progress in this way leads to improved health, user satisfaction and long-term sustained engagement.


more at http://gigaom.com/2014/02/22/the-three-critical-factors-wearable-devices-need-to-succeed/



Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from patient engaged
Scoop.it!

Online Forums and Patient-Centered Drug Development | HealthWorks Collective

Online Forums and Patient-Centered Drug Development | HealthWorks Collective | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
The patient community has been actively using online communication channels, notably online forums to share experiences, provide recommendations and even collect self-reported data for clinical analysis.

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Ginny Dillon
more...
Ginny Dillon's curator insight, August 14, 2013 3:32 PM

Some patients (epatients) participating in online communities are contributing to science.

Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from B2B Content Marketing
Scoop.it!

Build a Brand Content Empire: What You Can Learn From LEGO

Build a Brand Content Empire: What You Can Learn From LEGO | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
LEGO is such a giant when it comes to brand content, that at times it more closely resembles a media company than a toy company. Here's a rundown of some of the major components of its well-integra...

Via Louisa Spiteri
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from Pharma Communication & Social Media
Scoop.it!

CVS adds OTC drug interaction checker to mobile app | mobihealthnews

CVS adds OTC drug interaction checker to mobile app | mobihealthnews | Health Innovation | Scoop.it

Retail pharmacy heavyweight CVS Caremark has added a drug interaction checker to its CVS Mobile app that cautions consumers when an over-the-counter medication might interact with other drugs they are taking. The Woonsocket, RI-based company says it is the first drugstore chain to include such a feature in a mobile app.


Via Dinesh Chindarkar
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Gwillim
Scoop.it!

Developing an adverse event decision tree for pharma

Developing an adverse event decision tree for pharma | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
more...
Sven Awege's curator insight, May 21, 2013 2:46 AM

These types of simple tools are really useful for our Pharma Marketer to break down the spychological barriers of social media listening.

Jonathan Richman did a great one, when he was stretching the limits with Dose of Digital, for off-label promotion (http://www.doseofdigital.com/2012/01/translating-fda-social-media-guidance/).

With simple tools like this in place, a handful of procedures and willing people behind them Pharma can already do most things the nay-sayers claim impossible. The proof is already there to see. Many of the visionaries are engaging and learning already. The laggards are already loosing critical time and will find catch-up painful but necessary.

Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Web therapy: 4 startups overcoming mental health taboos with technology

Web therapy: 4 startups overcoming mental health taboos with technology | Health Innovation | Scoop.it

For a new generation of patients, could the laptop — or even cellphone — replace the stereotypical shrink’s couch? A crop of new startups wants to take psychotherapy into the 21st century.

 

About one in five Americans will experience a mental health challenge during their lifetime, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Association. But experts say that 60 percent of them will never seek help. The lack of available care, inconvenience and cost are all barriers to access, but so is the fear of prejudice and discrimination from friends, family and even employers.

 

“Stigma and shame is a huge factor – maybe the most important one,” said Oren Frank, founder of mental health startup Talktala. “People who have been to regular therapy are less ashamed of it, but people who are newcomers are paralyzed by fear.”

 

Online options enable people to receive therapy on their own turf and terms, without needing to update others on their whereabouts – and they offer the benefit of anonymity.


Via nrip
more...
malek's comment, May 6, 2013 7:11 AM
anonymity vs patient-doctor relationship
Online Therapist's curator insight, May 6, 2015 1:50 PM
Learn more about Online Mindfulness Therapy for the treatment of Anxiety and Depression: http://www.counselingtherapyonline.com.Visit my YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/pdmstrong.
Scooped by Jonathan Gwillim
Scoop.it!

Study: UK telehealth not cost effective | Healthcare IT News

Study: UK telehealth not cost effective | Healthcare IT News | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
Jonathan Gwillim's insight:

This market is set to grow by 55% in 2013, but study shows it's not cost effective??

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from patient engaged
Scoop.it!

Using LinkedIn to Change the Lives of Patients Affected by Rare Diseases | Official LinkedIn Blog

Using LinkedIn to Change the Lives of Patients Affected by Rare Diseases | Official LinkedIn Blog | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
I was on the 21st floor of the Hilton Hotel in San Francisco, looking out over an expansive view of the city, musing on how my life had changed from one of a scared and uninformed mom of a very sick child, to one of a rare disease advocate giving...

Via Ginny Dillon
Jonathan Gwillim's insight:

Great story and a potentially a massive untapped use of LinkedIn

more...
Ginny Dillon's curator insight, March 6, 2013 6:40 PM

Last month, I had the opportunity to attend LinkedIn’s Global Sales Kickoff to speak with 2,000 of their employees about how LinkedIn changed my life and the lives of 1 in 10 American patients who are affected by rare diseases.

Scooped by Jonathan Gwillim
Scoop.it!

inVentiv Digital at ExL Paris | inVentiv Digital | We’re the digital and innovation engine of inVentiv Health Communications, part of the wider inVentiv Health group…

inVentiv Digital at ExL Paris | inVentiv Digital | We’re the digital and innovation engine of inVentiv Health Communications, part of the wider inVentiv Health group… | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
Hello, we're inVentiv Digital - we're the digital and innovation engine of inVentiv Health Communications, part of the wider inVentiv Health group.
Jonathan Gwillim's insight:

Duncan @inVentivDigitaloverview of the digital event at BMS last week - is pharma finally innovating? http://sco.lt/..

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Gwillim
Scoop.it!

More than a broken leg: when patients and NHS staff really count as people

More than a broken leg: when patients and NHS staff really count as people | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
The health service needs a new mindset of personalised care so that hospital patients and staff feel that they really matter as people, says Helen Sanderson
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Gwillim
Scoop.it!

Five things big pharma can learn from the rare disease community

Five things big pharma can learn from the rare disease community | Health Innovation | Scoop.it

Companies in the rare disease space have learned lessons big pharma can use too:

 

1. Patient engagement starts in clinical trials

2. Silence isn't safe

3. Support must go beyond the brand

4. Don't wait for a crisis

5. True innovation begins with outcomes

more...
rob halkes's curator insight, March 6, 2014 4:35 AM

We can guide pharma to innovate, but they must implement it themselves .. ;-)

Gary Monk's curator insight, March 6, 2014 12:00 PM

Interesting article

MyHealthShare's curator insight, March 8, 2014 7:00 AM

Five things big pharma can learn from the rare disease community | http://myhealthshare.org @andrewspong http://sco.lt/...

Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from E-HEALTH - E-SANTE - PHARMAGEEK
Scoop.it!

England health data fiasco provides perfect case study in the importance of trust

England health data fiasco provides perfect case study in the importance of trust | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
It’s one of the great questions of our times: if you have loads of interesting data that can be used for the benefit of all, how does that square up against people’s desire, or indeed right, to maintain control over their own information?

Via Emmanuel Capitaine , Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Gwillim
Scoop.it!

Duplo in a Lego World | inVentiv Digital | We’re the digital and innovation engine of inVentiv Health Communications, part of the wider inVentiv Health group…

Duplo in a Lego World | inVentiv Digital | We’re the digital and innovation engine of inVentiv Health Communications, part of the wider inVentiv Health group… | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
Hello, we're inVentiv Digital - we're the digital and innovation engine of inVentiv Health Communications, part of the wider inVentiv Health group.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from Social services news
Scoop.it!

Informing clinical practice by interacting with lived patient experiences

Informing clinical practice by interacting with lived patient experiences | Health Innovation | Scoop.it

"What is true is that as people with diabetes become more knowledgeable, empowered, and in contact with one and other, the existing model of diabetes healthcare provision (the top down approach) is being challenged. The more forward thinking clinicians and stakeholders are grabbing this opportunity to inform their practice through interaction with this new body of lived experiences the diabetes online community provides. This then contributes and informs the development of care pathways, service and support provision utilising a bottom up approach to service delivery."


Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor, irissorg
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from Ideas, Innovation & Start-ups
Scoop.it!

Why You Need to Innovate in Tough Times

Why You Need to Innovate in Tough Times | Health Innovation | Scoop.it

It's natural to try to cut back in tough economic times, and consequently, organisations often cut innovation. This is a mistake. The best results coming out of recessions happen when firms balance short-term and long-term oriented innovation.

 

Most people are surprised to hear ...


Via Justin Jones
Jonathan Gwillim's insight:

survey of  2700 global executives  - 25% said innovation is top priority.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Gwillim
Scoop.it!

Patients Create Communities of Support and Inspiration

Patients Create Communities of Support and Inspiration | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
Submitted by Carolyn Lyden of Nucleus Medical Media.  At 360 pounds, Chris Davis had about 140 pounds to go to reach his goal weight when he started the Facebook page "Project Chris Davis." One hun...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Gwillim
Scoop.it!

Bayer HealthCare unveils new startup incubator and Grants4Apps scheme in Germany

Bayer HealthCare unveils new startup incubator and Grants4Apps scheme in Germany | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
Health industry heavyweight Bayer HealthCare is keen to get closer to startups, with a just-announced incubator and new "Grants4Apps" scheme in Germany.
Jonathan Gwillim's insight:

the model for pharma innovation teams to create quick innovation? 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from Digital Healthcare Trends
Scoop.it!

A diabetes doctor’s wish list for mobile health

A diabetes doctor’s wish list for mobile health | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
The daily testing and monitoring responsibilities for diabetes patients has made them, and their physicians, a prime target for mobile health products and services.

Via Ricard Robledo
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Gwillim
Scoop.it!

Using Google Data To Predict Drug Side Effects

Using Google Data To Predict Drug Side Effects | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
There’s a scene in an old 30 Rock episode where we see Liz Lemon’s most recent Google searches: “singles yoga” and “scalp pain.” Hilarious, yes, but the moment also illustrated how often we appeal to the Internet with nebulous health concerns like...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from Digital Health
Scoop.it!

Content marketing in healthcare - understanding role and maintaining credibility

Content marketing in healthcare - understanding role and maintaining credibility | Health Innovation | Scoop.it
Online healthcare portals and communities are critical sources for patients and caregivers who are seeking trusted information related to their condition. Health related Internet use has become one of the top three online activities in the world..

Via Alex Butler
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jonathan Gwillim from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Digital Health - The Cost of Neglecting Patient Engagement

Digital Health - The Cost of Neglecting Patient Engagement | Health Innovation | Scoop.it

The new paradigm in communications has once again recognized the humanity, or more importantly the individuality, of the consumer and seeks to understand how to engage with these individuals.

The challenge has shifted away from the question of "how do we get the consumer to act?" towards a far more relevant question to the health industry of "how do we build a relationship with the consumer?"

The past few years have seen huge efforts made in better understanding consumer engagement and some amazing technologies are emerging to support personalization and to support improved engagement.

Patient and consumer truly have become synonymous, not because we are dehumanizing patients, but because they [marketers] have finally seen the wisdom of humanizing consumers.


Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.