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Thawed, fresh embryos work equally well in many women

Thawed, fresh embryos work equally well in many women | health service | Scoop.it
By Gene Emery(Reuters Health) - - Women with infertility unrelated to a common hormonal disorder may have more options when they try in-vitro fertilization, two large new studies show.Whereas in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), freezing and thawing embryos before implantation offers a better chance of pregnancy and birth, in women without this condition thawed embryos and are no better or worse than fresh embryos, researchers in China and Vietnam have found.The findings may encourage doctors to just implant one embryo at a time, lowering the risks that come when doctors try to implant more, producing multiple births and their associated complications. The papers, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, are "good news for women seeking in-vitro fertilization," said Dr. Lan Vuong, chief author of the Vietnamese study. After an earlier study by the Chinese team showed that frozen embryos were better for women with PCOS, "a lot of people jumped to the conclusion that we should always do frozen. Some programs around the country won't do fresh transfers anymore," said Dr. Christos Coutifaris of the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia, who was not connected with the new research."Now these two papers, equally large and done in non-PCOS patients, show that in terms of live birth, which is what we care about, there is no difference," he told Reuters Health by phone. "So to apply the rule to everybody that we should freeze your embryos is probably not correct."Dr. Vuong said that in the past, doctors have often implanted more than one fresh embryo in women because of concerns that a frozen transfer may not work as well.The fact that thawed embryos "produce the same pregnancy rate with less complications should transform the way in-vitro fertilization is practiced," she told Reuters Health by email. "After the first fresh embryo transfer, it will be possible to freeze the remaining embryos and transfer them one by one, if necessary, without reducing the chance of pregnancy."Dr. Vuong, of the University of Medicine and Pharmacy at Ho Chi Minh City, and her colleagues also found that women with high levels of the female hormone progesterone might be better off receiving a thawed frozen embryo.Dr. Coutifaris, who is president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, said a higher progesterone level may indicate that the development of the embryo and the womb are out of synch, and using a thawed embryo allows for better timing of the implantation.It's one example where "the challenge for us, as practitioners, is to determine who are the patients who will benefit from a freeze-only approach," he said.In the Chinese study of 2,157 women undergoing their first in-vitro fertilization cycle, the birth rate was 48.7 percent with thawed embryos and 50.2 percent with fresh. Doctors typically implanted two embryos per attempt.In the Vietnam study of 782 women undergoing their first or second attempt, the live birth rates after the first transfer were 33.8 percent with frozen and 31.5 percent for fresh. They also implanted, on average, two at a time.In both studies, the difference in birth rates between the groups was so small that it might have been due to chance.Neither study found a higher risk of neonatal or obstetrical complications in either group, although frozen embryo transfer produced a statistically lower risk of over-stimulated ovaries, which leads to swollen and painful ovaries and is potentially dangerous. The rates of the syndrome in the Chinese study were 0.6 percent with frozen embryos and 2.0 percent with fresh. The senior author was Dr. Zi-Jiang Chen of Shandong University, who did not respond to emailed questions.It was the Chen group that, in 2016, reported that frozen-then-thawed embryos offered a 7-percentage-point edge when it came to producing live births among infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome: 49 percent versus 42 percent. The improvement came primarily from a lower rate of pregnancy loss."The cost for freezing embryos is about 30 percent more than that for fresh transfer," said Dr. Vuong. "However, the effectiveness of the treatment should be considered in decisions about which approach is more cost-effective. We have done a cost-effectiveness analysis of the two treatments and found that freezing embryos and subsequent transfer is not cost-effective over fresh transfer."SOURCES: bit.ly/2m2bPYw and bit.ly/2CxHmro The New England Journal of Medicine, online January 10, 2018.
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Many women uninformed about breast cancer surgery options

Many women uninformed about breast cancer surgery options | health service | Scoop.it
By Lisa Rapaport(Reuters Health) - - Women with breast cancer often feel rushed to make a decision about surgery, and some of them might benefit from more time and better educational materials to inform their treatment choices, two recent studies suggest. One study surveyed 487 women after they underwent either a lumpectomy that removes malignant tissue while sparing the rest of the breast, a mastectomy that removes the entire breast, or both procedures. Regardless of what path they took, at least one in five women said choosing quickly was more important than making an informed decision, and at least as many patients felt like they didn’t have all the facts before their operations. “A breast cancer diagnosis can feel like an emergency when you are the patient,” said lead study author Dr. Sunny Mitchell, a breast surgeon in Stratford, Connecticut. “There is actually plenty of time to review all treatment options since survival rates are very high for early-stage breast cancer and do not change if a woman starts treatment within a few weeks,” Mitchell said by email. Most early-stage breast cancer patients have either a lumpectomy or a mastectomy, and many of them get chemotherapy or radiation afterward to destroy any remaining abnormal cells and reduce the risk of cancer coming back.In the survey, only 47 percent of lumpectomy patients, 67 percent of mastectomy patients, and 28 percent of women who had both procedures said they felt completely informed before they had these surgeries, Mitchell and colleagues found. A quick decision was more important than an informed decision for 35 percent of the lumpectomy patients, 31 percent of the mastectomy patients, and 22 percent of the women who had both procedures.A separate study in the same journal offers one way to help women understand their options. For that study, researchers randomly assigned 227 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer to use an online decision-making tool or to read materials available on websites run by groups like the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute. All of the women participated in the study before their first surgical consultation. With the decision aid, half of the women scored at least 80 out of 100 on tests of their knowledge about breast cancer and treatment options, compared with a median score of 66 for women who reviewed material on various websites. At the same time, 72 percent of the women who used the decision aid recognized that they could wait a few weeks to make an informed treatment choice without affecting their survival odds, compared with just 54 percent for the other women. “Women benefit from receiving high-quality information about breast cancer prior to their first visit with a surgeon,” senior study author Dr. Heather Neuman, a researcher at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, said by email. Decision aids can help women clarify their personal values and preferences, for example by focusing on whether they want to avoid radiation or concentrate on preserving their breasts, said Dr. Clara Lee, a cancer researcher at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus. This process can also prepare women to talk to their provider about treatment options and make an informed decision, Lee, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email. Women can still make an educated choice, aided by information online, even when they don’t use a decision aid, Lee added. “Women should look for information that presents multiple treatment options and the pros and cons of those options – not just the pros,” Lee advised. “Making a decision is about more than just information; it’s also about being clear on what is important to you and being prepared to discuss these things actively with your provider.”SOURCES: bit.ly/2EvQygi and bit.ly/2Ev7wLP Journal of the American College of Surgeons, online December 12, 2017.
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Hysterectomy May Have Long-Term Health Risks

Hysterectomy May Have Long-Term Health Risks | health service | Scoop.it
The study tracked the health of nearly 2,100 women who underwent a hysterectomy, and a matched set of
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Severe Flu Season Tightens Its Grip on U.S.

Severe Flu Season Tightens Its Grip on U.S. | health service | Scoop.it
In the West, emergency rooms in California and Arizona are packed with people struck by the flu, and drugs that ease the illness are in short supply as doctors  struggle with a sharp spike in cases.

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Well: Challenge: The Intentional Summer

Well: Challenge: The Intentional Summer | health service | Scoop.it
Every week, we’ll offer research-based suggestions for ways to set this season apart from the rest of the year.
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Well: Ask Well: Can You Train Yourself to Need Less Sleep?

Well: Ask Well: Can You Train Yourself to Need Less Sleep? | health service | Scoop.it
Many people think they can teach themselves to need less sleep, but they’re wrong.
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Teen marijuana use in Colorado found lower than national average

Teen marijuana use in Colorado found lower than national average | health service | Scoop.it
DENVER (Reuters) - Marijuana consumption by Colorado high school students has dipped slightly since the state first permitted recreational cannabis use by adults, a new survey showed on Monday, contrary to concerns that legalization would increase...
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Australian watchdog sues Heinz over 'Little Kids' health claims

Australian watchdog sues Heinz over 'Little Kids' health claims | health service | Scoop.it
SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australia's consumer watchdog on Tuesday sued the Australian subsidiary of U.S.-based Kraft Heinz Co alleging it falsely advertised the nutritional value of its Little Kids Shredz range of food for young children.
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Health Insurance Marketplace, Coverage Options, Fraud and More

Health Insurance Marketplace, Coverage Options, Fraud and More | health service | Scoop.it
Learn more about coverage options, health insurance marketplace, long term care insurance.
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Condom shortage hampers India's AIDS fight

Condom shortage hampers India's AIDS fight | health service | Scoop.it
NEW DELHI (Reuters) - Indian sex worker Shaalu is using fewer condoms when she meets her clients in New Delhi - not out of choice, but because a funding crunch and procurement delays in the state-run HIV/AIDS program have disrupted supplies of free...
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Portugal's Left Bloc party says national health service at risk - GlobalPost

LISBON, Sept. 28 (Xinhua) -- The leader of Portugal's Left Bloc, Catarina Martins, on Monday highlighted the Portuguese National Health Service (SNS) 's important role and called for professionals to be respected.
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CareOregon Grants to Expand Behavioral Health Services - Public News Service

CareOregon Grants to Expand Behavioral Health Services - Public News Service | health service | Scoop.it
PORTLAND, Ore. – CareOregon is making a $7 million investment to add staff and more behavioral health services to some of the clinics in its provider network.
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Pharmacy Technician Trainee \ Pharmacy Service Associate Jobs in Louisiana at CVS Health

Pharmacy Technician Trainee \ Pharmacy Service Associate jobs in FRANKLINTON currently available at CVS Health. Additional FRANKLINTON Pharmacy Technician jobs also available at CVS Health.
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Smaller social network tied to bigger diabetes risk

Smaller social network tied to bigger diabetes risk | health service | Scoop.it
By Lisa Rapaport(Reuters Health) - - Socially isolated people may be more likely to develop diabetes than adults with closer ties to family and friends, a recent study suggests. Loneliness has long been linked to a wide variety of physical and mental health problems, particularly among chronically ill and elderly people. With diabetes in particular, close friends and family can influence how patients eat, how much they exercise, and how well they keep the disease in check. To see how these relationships may influence the odds of getting diabetes in the first place, researchers examined data on 2,861 adults who ranged in age from 40 to 75 and were 60 years old on average. More than half of these people had normal blood sugar and no diagnosis of diabetes. But 430 people, or 15 percent, had slightly elevated blood sugar classified as “pre-diabetes,” while about 4 percent were newly diagnosed with diabetes when they joined the study and 24 percent already had the disease. On average, people without diabetes had 11 friends and family members in their social network, compared with fewer than 8 friends for people with newly or previously diagnosed diabetes, researchers report in BMC Public Health. “Currently, high-risk groups receive advice to become more physically active and eat healthier without any inquiries about their social situation,” said lead study author Stephanie Brinkhues, a researcher at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. “We think that this could be improved . . . as socially isolated people may even have a higher risk for disease,” Brinkhues said by email.Every one-person reduction in the size of people’s social networks was associated with 12 percent higher odds of newly diagnosed diabetes in women and 10 percent higher odds for men, the study found. This was also tied to 8 percent greater likelihood of a previous diabetes diagnosis in women, and 5 percent greater odds for men. At the same time, each 10 percent drop in the number of social network members living within walking distance was associated with 21 percent higher odds of a new diabetes diagnosis for women. Every 10 percent increase in the proportion of the social network made of household members, meanwhile, was associated with 25 percent higher odds of a new diabetes diagnosis in women and 29 percent higher odds for men. Living alone didn’t appear to influence the odds of diabetes for women. But for men, living alone was associated with 84 percent higher odds of a new diabetes diagnosis and 94 percent higher odds of a previous diagnosis. The study wasn’t a controlled experiment designed to prove whether or how the number of people in social networks or the types of interactions within networks might influence the risk of diabetes. Even so, the study adds to the evidence linking social isolation to diabetes and other chronic illnesses that can impact both quality of life and longevity, said Dr. Carla Perissinotto, a geriatrics researcher at the University of California, San Francisco. “Social isolation doesn’t cause diabetes, but there is a relationship,” Perissinotto, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email. One theory is that too much time alone might lead to increased stress and inflammatory reactions in the body, Perissinotto added. Stress hormones are thought to influence how the body processes glucose, or sugars, and may contribute to the development of diabetes. The study results offer fresh evidence of the importance of maintaining an active social life in middle age and beyond, said Dawn C. Carr, a researcher at Florida State University in Tallahassee who wasn’t involved in the study. People who have many close relationships with friends and family members may be more motivated to be socially engaged, physically active and follow a healthy lifestyle, Carr said by email. By contrast, people who live alone may have less motivation to cook healthy meals, get out and exercise or do other things that can keep health problems at bay.“We need to nurture important relationships and be sure that we take our social health as seriously as our physical and psychological health,” Carr advised. “This is something we need to cultivate throughout our lives before we reach old age.”SOURCE: bit.ly/2EucMzy BMC Public Health, online December 19, 2017.
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Antacids During Pregnancy Tied to Asthma in Children

Antacids During Pregnancy Tied to Asthma in Children | health service | Scoop.it
Taking popular drugs for heartburn, a common complication of pregnancy, raised the risk of asthma in offspring.
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Dunkin' Donuts Stops Use of Artificial Dyes

Dunkin' Donuts Stops Use of Artificial Dyes | health service | Scoop.it
A number of other food companies have also removed artificial dyes from their products.
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Excessive Video Gaming To Be Labeled A Disorder

Excessive Video Gaming To Be Labeled A Disorder | health service | Scoop.it
In 2018, the World Health Organization (WHO) will officially add
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Poor Sleep and Thinking Problems in MS Patients

Poor Sleep and Thinking Problems in MS Patients | health service | Scoop.it
Study found link between severity of sleep apnea and performance on attention, memory tests
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Congo declares yellow fever epidemic, 1,000 suspected cases

Congo declares yellow fever epidemic, 1,000 suspected cases | health service | Scoop.it
KINSHASA (Reuters) - Democratic Republic of Congo on Monday declared a yellow fever epidemic in three provinces, including the capital Kinshasa, after confirming 67 cases of the disease, with another 1,000 suspected cases being monitored.
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Why Handwriting Is Still Essential in the Keyboard Age

Why Handwriting Is Still Essential in the Keyboard Age | health service | Scoop.it
It is more than just a motor skill, researchers say. It engages the mind.
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Exclusive: In Zika-struck Puerto Rico, trouble delivering donated contraceptives

Exclusive: In Zika-struck Puerto Rico, trouble delivering donated contraceptives | health service | Scoop.it
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Only a small fraction of contraceptives donated in Puerto Rico to prevent Zika-related birth defects are expected to get to the women who need them this month, public health officials told Reuters.
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New kind of 'designer' immune cells clear baby's leukemia

New kind of 'designer' immune cells clear baby's leukemia | health service | Scoop.it
(This version of the Nov.5 story corrects date of ASH meeting to December 5-8, para 12)
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Humiliation for Cameron's seven day health service as patients DON'T USE out ... - Express.co.uk

Humiliation for Cameron's seven day health service as patients DON'T USE out ... - Express.co.uk | health service | Scoop.it
DAVID Cameron's pilot schemes set up to improve seven-day access to GPs have cut their hours because not enough people are using them.
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BigPanda Launches Service Health Analytics - News Press Release | PharmiWeb.com

BigPanda Launches Service Health Analytics - News Press Release | PharmiWeb.com | health service | Scoop.it
BigPanda Launches Service Health Analytics
The Leading Data Science-Based IT Data Correlation Platform Adds Analytics
PR Newswire
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., Sept.
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