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Could A Blood Test Predict When You Will Die?

Could A Blood Test Predict When You Will Die? | Health Research | Scoop.it
Online quizzes that predict when you’re going to die were popular for a while, but now there is an actual test that could uncover your expiration date. 17,000 samples of blood from Finland and Estonia were tested to uncover which of 100 biomarkers were present in people that died within five years. Researchers turned up four specific biomarkers linked to a higher risk of dying from heart disease, cancer, and other illnesses.The four culprits responsible for early death include albumin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, citrate, and the size of low-density lipoprotein particles. Albumin has already been linked to early death in the past, but the other three have been under the radar until now. Scientists made sure there there were no other contributing factors either, such as old age, obesity, cholesterol levels, or alcohol use, amongst others.

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If you could do this would you do it?
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Rescooped by Rita Cinquemani from healthcare technology
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Health researchers see unique opportunity in self-tracker data

Health researchers see unique opportunity in self-tracker data | Health Research | Scoop.it
As the number of self-tracking health and fitness tools available to consumers continues to climb, a persistent question has been whether the data they collect might be useful to health researchers. Along with that: Are people who self-track comfortable sharing their data with researchers?A new, must-read report from San Diego’s California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, explores these and other questions.Based on a survey with hundreds of self-trackers, a majority — 57 percent — said one critical assurance they would need before agreeing to make their self-tracked, personal health data available to researchers was that their privacy would be protected. More than 90 percent also said it was important that their data remained anonymous. Respondents said they’d be more comfortable sharing data if they knew it was only going to be used for “public good” research.One open-ended survey that the report’s researchers posed to self-trackers found that 13 percent of respondents specifically mentioned an aversion to commercial or profit-making use of their data, according to the report. One respondent wrote: “It depends who gets it. Research using these data will be instrumental in the future of personal predictive services, but also for that reason are likely to be exploited by marketers and the politically short-sighted. Thus I would like transparency for who has access to my data.”
Among the almost 100 health researchers interviewed for the report, 46 percent said that they had already used self-tracking data in their research previously. Some 23 percent reported that they had already worked with digital health companies that offer apps or devices to consumers to track their health.Overall, the researchers interviewed for the report were “generally enthusiastic” about the prospect of using self-tracking data in the future — 89 percent agreed or strongly agreed that such data would prove useful to their research efforts. Almost all of those researchers surveyed said that kind of data could answer questions that other data could not.more at http://mobihealthnews.com/30979/health-researchers-see-unique-opportunity-in-self-tracker-data/

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Rita Cinquemani's insight:
Start with myfitnesspal or Lose it applications on your moble phone. Track your progress with moble imput of nutrition and exercise.
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Rescooped by Rita Cinquemani from healthcare technology
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New Apple pedometer patent may hint at a future iWatch

New Apple pedometer patent may hint at a future iWatch | Health Research | Scoop.it
A newly published Apple patent application that details ways to improve a wrist-based pedometer could represent another piece of evidence pointing to an iWatch.The application, “Wrist Pedometer Step Detection,” came out of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office today. This is part of the standard patent process toward issuance. It details ways to improve step detection when someone is wearing a pedometer on a wrist.In the patent application’s implementation, the pedometer might be able to “automatically determine that the pedometer is being worn on a user’s wrist.”Pedometers, the application points out, are often attached to a user’s trunk – on the waist or pants or shirt pocket. A commonly used algorithm to measures steps, however, doesn’t work as well when the pedometer is on a wrist, because the arm’s movement can interfere with the measurement of acceleration.
Apple’s patent application would overcome this by filtering the measured movement or inferring steps from previous measurements, leading to more accurate step counts and distance estimation. Additionally, the document notes, “users do not have to specify where the pedometer is being worn” because the software will compensate.

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