Health Policy
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Masters in Health Administration: Brett Hicks

http://www.ohio.edu Ohio University is dedicated to providing our students with an outstanding and transformative education. Originally established in 1804, ...
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Hospital Administrator at St. Lukes Orthopaedic and Trauma ...

Hospital Administrator jobs at St. Lukes Orthopaedic and Trauma Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya. Search Eldoret jobs. Hospital Administrator at St. Lukes Orthopaedic and Trauma Hospital in Eldoret – Kenya Jobs, Careers.
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Edible Batteries to Power Edible Devices

Edible Batteries to Power Edible Devices | Health Policy | Scoop.it

Batteries made from pigments found in cuttlefish ink may lead to edible, dissolvable power sources for new kinds of medical devices. Researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University materials scientist Christopher Bettinger demonstrated the new battery. “Instead of lithium and toxic electrolytes that work really well but aren’t biocompatible, we chose simple materials of biological origin,” Bettinger says.


Conventional battery materials are not safe inside the body unless they’re encased in bulky protective cases that must eventually be surgically removed. Electronics that can either be swallowed or implanted in the body without causing harm could monitor wound healing and disease progression, release drugs, and enable more sensitive neural and cardiovascular sensors and stimulators.


The prototype sodium-ion battery from the CMU researchers uses melanin from cuttlefish ink for the anode and manganese oxide as the cathode. All the materials in the battery break down into nontoxic components in the body.


These batteries could  be a potential source of power for the next generation of “smart pills” and biodegradable medical devices.


curated from http://www.technologyreview.com/news/522581/biodegradable-batteries-to-power-smart-medical-devices/


and 


http://medcitynews.com/2013/12/wow-week-3/


and 


http://www.cmu.edu/news/stories/archives/2013/december/dec9_cuttlefishbatteries.html



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Healthcare Administration - Dept. of Public Health at WKU

Testimonials about the HCA program through the Department of Public Health at WKU.
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From Scans, Doctors 3D Print Custom Heart Wraps to Deliver Treatments

From Scans, Doctors 3D Print Custom Heart Wraps to Deliver Treatments | Health Policy | Scoop.it

The buzz about 3D printing can at times give the impression that the technology is a panacea that makes all manufacturing cheaper. The truth is 3D printing has one very specific use case: It makes prototypes and custom, one-of-a-kind items cheaper and faster to make.


Medicine would seem like a prime beneficiary of this technology, potentially using 3D printing to provide patients with custom-made implants and stents. Yet, to date, medical researchers have focused on the most ambitious goals for the technology, such as replacement organs printed from a patient’s own stem cells, which need years of development before they reach average patients.


Recently, a somewhat more modest medical device — and one that could find its way relatively quickly into treatment protocols — was created using 3D printing. Researchers Igor Efimov from Washington University in St. Louis and John Rogers from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used MRI and CT scans of rabbit and human hearts to 3D-print custom-fitting flexible mesh sacs that fit each heart perfectly and stayed in place as it beat.


“Each heart is a different shape, and current devices are one-size-fits-all and don’t at all conform to the geometry of a patient’s heart,” said Efimov.


Inside its fabric, the mesh can also hold sensors that monitor for signs of trouble and deliver electrical pulses, if needed. The sensors are embedded in the fabric using technology similar to what Google has said it will use in sugar-monitoring contact lenses, only more nuanced.


Doctors can position the sensors or electrodes more precisely using the wrap than by attaching them directly to the heart with sutures or adhesives, Efimov and Rogers state in a recent paper in Nature Communications. They demonstrate in the paper that sensors attached to the mesh (or multifunctional integumentary membrane) accurately measure temperature, mechanical strain and pH, and could deliver pulses of electricity.


Depending on the sensors used, the heart wrap could improve treatments for a range of disorders; it could also be used to deliver medication directly to where its needed. But the device was conceptualized specifically to treat ventricle deformities and arrhythmias. The arrhythmia atrial fibrillation affects about 4 million Americans; patients often undergo a surgery that destroys the heart’s own drummer, the atrioventricular node, and subsequently receive a pacemaker.


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DNA Nanotechnology the Future of Modern Medicine?

DNA Nanotechnology the Future of Modern Medicine? | Health Policy | Scoop.it

One of the most significant achievements in the field of biomedical engineering is the creation of DNA nanobots. These molecular robots made of DNA are designed to deliver medicines to specific cells that require healing and to target harmful cells, killing them without harming the healthy ones.


Unlike commonly used drugs and supplements, nanobots have a measure of intelligence and can conveniently move through the body in smart ways.


How are these nanobots produced? Scientists use DNA, breaking up the components and rearranging them into shapes such as barrels to carry medicine. DNA naturally has a tendency to react in certain ways to outside stimuli, and its components assemble according to natural attraction and repulsion. These reactions are manipulated to make the nanobots and to program them.


Nanobots are free-floating structures that move through the bloodstream and remain neutral until they encounter a particular site that requires assistance. With the help of molecular cues programmed into them, they can identify a precise location and perform the necessary actions.


Treatment with nanobots could prove to be especially effective against cancer. With chemotherapy treatment, healthy cells are killed along with the cancerous cells. Nanobots can detect the cancerous cells, however, and only release medicine upon encountering them.


Read more: http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/390772-dna-nanobots-the-future-of-modern-medicine/#ixzz2oWJdpY00


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Sidney Williams-Goddess's curator insight, February 5, 2014 11:46 PM

This article is about the eventual use of nanotechnology in humans to work as little nurses, called nanobots, to deliver medicine directly to sick or cancerous cells with out harming the healthy cells. I am really fascinated by nanotechnology, it is crazy ad unknown to me, i would really like to learn more about it. This article is from The Epoch Times, which in their "about us" claims "unwavering commitment to objective reporting" . 

Jay Gadani's curator insight, August 6, 2014 11:45 PM

So long as the little bugs damage my insides!