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82 HIV infections diagnosed in Palestine since 1988 - Ma'an News Agency

82 HIV infections diagnosed in Palestine since 1988 - Ma'an News Agency | Health issues | Scoop.it
82 HIV infections diagnosed in Palestine since 1988 Ma'an News Agency BETHLEHEM (Ma'an) – Despite the fact that HIV infection rate in Palestine is among the lowest in the world, the Palestinian Ministry of Health is exerting major efforts to...

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
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Preventing Malaria by Protecting Mosquitoes | Wired Science

Preventing Malaria by Protecting Mosquitoes | Wired Science | Health issues | Scoop.it

Mosquitoes suck. And malaria sucks even more. The disease—caused by the Plasmodium parasite, which is transmitted by mosquitoes—infects more than 300 million people and kills 1.2 million annually.

 

One way to protect humans, though, is to protect the mosquitoes: If they’re not sick, you won’t be either. Researchers are working on two ways to get this done, both using bacteria. (Field tests could be five years away, so keep slapping on the DEET.)

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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To save Americans' health, government must intervene in food industry - Al Jazeera America

To save Americans' health, government must intervene in food industry - Al Jazeera America | Health issues | Scoop.it
To save Americans' health, government must intervene in food industry
Al Jazeera America
Even the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is not immune to this influence.
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UN sued over Haiti cholera epidemic

UN sued over Haiti cholera epidemic | Health issues | Scoop.it
The UN faces a claim for compensation by victims of a cholera epidemic in Haiti, which victims' lawyers say was caused by peacekeepers.

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
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2013 - The Leap Year Against Cholera: Global Support for Vaccines ...

2013 - The Leap Year Against Cholera: Global Support for Vaccines ... | Health issues | Scoop.it
2013 will be known as a leap year in progress in the fight against cholera – it is the year when global access and financing for oral cholera vaccines became available.
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1832 Cholera Epidemic in NYC

1832 Cholera Epidemic in NYC | Health issues | Scoop.it
A cholera outbreak in New York in 1832 led to broad efforts to clean up the city and others like it.

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HIV Tracking Technology Could Pinpoint Who's Infecting Who

HIV Tracking Technology Could Pinpoint Who's Infecting Who | Health issues | Scoop.it
Scanning electron microscope shows HIV proliferation (in green) Photo via CDC
No man is an island, but evolutionarily, each person functions like one for the HIV virus.

Via Thomas Faltin
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CHD awareness video

CHD awareness video | Health issues | Scoop.it
A stunning CHD awareness video made by Kerrington's Heart Inc.

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Mobile Phones to Improve HIV Care

Mobile Phones to Improve HIV Care | Health issues | Scoop.it

Almost all health care is voluntary: patients choose when to engage in care, when to take their medicine (if they choose to take it), and whether to return for follow-up visits. In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and other chronic diseases, the benefits of medication adherence for the patient and public health are tremendous.

 

Mobile health — the use of mobile devices such as cell phones to improve health outcomes and health care services — has been shown to be effective in promoting adherence to treatment for HIV infection. The World Health Organization has strongly recommended text messaging as a reminder tool to increase adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

 

However, the potential of mobile health is much greater than just reminders. A randomized, controlled trial in Kenya that showed the effectiveness of text messaging to improve outcomes of HIV treatment used weekly interactive check-ins to ask patients how they were doing, with follow-up phone calls to those reporting a problem. This model involved a weekly text message to patients with a single word — “Mambo?” (“How are you?”).

 

The intention was to promote self-care rather than issue timed medication reminders. The patients reported that they felt cared for and supported. Clinic staff indicated that the intervention made their work more effective and efficient, since they could focus on patients who needed and wanted their help. Text-messaging services with frequent medication reminders increase costs and result in user fatigue. In separate trials, neither medication alarm devices nor daily text-message reminders improved adherence.

 

The provision of health information through mobile phones offers the opportunity to improve health literacy. But does it translate into improved adherence? Although this may be possible, effectiveness has not yet been shown in controlled studies.

 

A randomized, controlled trial showed that longer motivational text messages with words of encouragement were no more effective at improving adherence than short messages. A separate trial of motivational messaging showed no effect on adherence. Imagine that patients are feeling sick, and a unidirectional text-messaging service keeps telling them they are important and cared for. It is better to show patients you care, rather than just tell them.

 original: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc1310509
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IBM uses Big Data to predict outbreaks of Dengue fever and Malaria

IBM uses Big Data to predict outbreaks of Dengue fever and Malaria | Health issues | Scoop.it

IBM has teamed up with university researchers to use big data and analytics to predict the outbreak of deadly diseases such as Dengue fever and Malaria.

The research is aimed at understanding the spread of diseases in real-time in order to better deploy public health resources to combat the spread of infectious diseases


But rather than just predicting the spread of a disease, the researchers are applying analytics from large data sets to see how changes in rainfall, temperature, and even soil acidity can dramatically affect the populations of wild animals and insects that carry the infectious diseases. They’re also merging that information with other data, like airport and highway traffic, to further understand outbreaks.


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